Blender crash

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4 Common render problems in Blender and how to solve them

There are many potential problems when it comes to rendering. Here, we cover a few of the common ones that I have come across many times and I am sure you will too.

  • Blender crashing before, during or after rendering
  • The finished render is a black screen
  • Objects are missing in the final render
  • We get a harsh line in the render, leaving part of the scene outside the view.

Let's dive in and see if we can solve your issue together.

Blender crashing on render

If you start a render and Blender crash and automatically close during the process it is most likely one of two reasons.

  • Blender ran out of available RAM
  • There was a graphics card issue

If we start with the RAM issue. To check if Blender is running out of RAM during rendering you can "casually" monitor this with the Task manager in Windows. For Linux and MacOS there are similar tools, but I will cover the Windows platform here.

Open the task manager with Ctrl+Shift+Esc. Press "More details" at the bottom of the window if you are in the minimal mode.

From here, go to the processes tab and sort by memory. When you start to render you will see that Blender rise to the top or close to it.

Related content: Memory optimization for rendering in Blender

In the performance tab you can also find memory usage as a graph for your entire system. Here you can see current memory usage and how much RAM you have.

These metrics are good to keep an eye on in real-time as you render. If you see that the memory shoot to the roof and Blender crashes it is a good indicator that your scene is too large for your computer to fit in memory.

To solve this, we need to reduce the amount of stuff Blender needs to keep in memory. We do this primarily through these areas.

  • Reduce the number of textures or use lower resolution textures.
  • Reduce the amount of geometry or objects in the scene.
  • Reduce the number of particles in your particle systems or rely more on child particle.
  • If using an HDRI, use a lower resolution or a sky texture instead

If you are rendering with a GPU, you could have problems with your driver. Personally, I have an Nvidia GPU. Nvidia provides two different drivers. One they call game ready driver and one called Studio driver.

For me, I have found that the Studio Driver is much more stable than the Game ready driver in Blender and is far less prone to crashing.

You can find the studio driver on NVidia download page. Where you select your graphics card and operating system, there is also a Download type dropdown menu. Here you can select between the game ready driver and the studio driver before you download.

External content: Nvidia graphics driver download page

AMD also have two different drivers and I suspect that there could be a comparable situation on their platform. The driver you are looking for there is called Radeon Pro software for enterprise.

External content: AMD graphics driver download page

For both platforms there are graphics cards that don't list these studio drivers. In that case, you should use the latest driver for your card.

If your scene is optimized and you have the correct drivers, a third possibility is that there is a bug in Blender. In that case, you can try to open your blend file and render with the latest long-term-support release or you can try the latest beta release.

You can find the latest LTS release here:

External content: Blender LTS releases

The latest beta releases can be found here:

External content: Blender Experimental releases

Blender renders black frames

If your final render seems to progress correctly as it renders but turns black once it finishes, it is probably because you have compositing nodes that are not connected correctly to the final composite node.

To solve this, go to the compositor workspace tab in Blenders header, and connect your render layers image output to the composite node. Or if you have other nodes setup, connect the last node in your node tree to the composite node to include all your post-processing effects.

Also, double check that "use nodes" is checked in the compositor header. Last, also go to your output properties in your properties panel, find the post processing section and check if Compositing and Sequencer is checked. They should be, by default.

These settings turn on or off the compositor and sequencer pipelines for rendering. So just switching these off and re-render can solve the issue as well.

Another solution can be to uncheck both settings and render again.

Keep in mind that if you render a still image, your render can still be recovered without rendering again by connecting the compositor properly.

If you are rendering an animation however, Blender will process whatever nodes are in the compositor and save the result to disk in your output folder. These rendered frames cannot be recovered. They will need to be rendered again.

If the compositor isn't the problem, the problem could be that you have strips in your sequence editor. In this case, unchecking the sequencer in the post-processing section can solve the problem. But I suggest that you double check that your sequencer is empty.

By default, there is no video editing workspace open in Blender. To open one, you can go to the plus sign, next to the last workspace. Go to Video editing->Video editing.

Once in the video editing workspace, you can press and hold your mouse wheel to pan inside the sequencer to see if you have any strips. If you find any that isn't supposed to be there, click on it to select it, then X to delete. You can also select all strips by pressing A. Just make sure that you don't delete any strip that you want to keep.

Missing objects in final render

If an object is missing in your final render there are primarily two reasons. The first one is that the object could have been disabled for rendering. The second option is that a particle system is attached to the object and that it is set to not render the emitter.

To check if an object is disabled for rendering, go to the outliner, and find the filter icon in the header. Check the camera icon. You will notice how a camera icon appears on the right side on each row in the outliner.

Find the object that isn't rendering properly either by name in the outliner or by selecting it in the 3D viewport then hover your mouse over the outliner and press period on the number pad to have the outliner focus on the correct object.

Make sure that the camera icon is white for your object. If it has a camera outline with an X, click it to enable the object. If it is grayed out, it means that the collection that the object is inside a collection that is disabled for rendering.

In this case, scroll up to the collection and make sure that it is enabled for rendering by clicking the camera icon with an X.

If you can't see the object in the 3D viewport or in the outliner it could be that it is inside a collection that is disabled for the current view layer. In that case, check if you have a grayed-out collection. If you find one, check the checkbox just to the left of the collections name and the content will become visible in the 3D viewport.

If this does not solve your problem, go to the particle tab in the properties panel and check if you have any particle system attached to the object. If you do, select the first particle system in the list, and go to the render section.

Here you will find a checkbox labeled "Show emitter". Make sure that it is checked.

If you have multiple particle systems, go through each one and make sure that this checkbox is checked for all of them.

Objects cannot be seen by the camera because of clipping

When objects seem to disappear when they are either too far or too close from the camera it is called clipping. This can be a problem both in the 3D viewport and for a final render.

For the final render we must check the clipping settings for the camera object we use for rendering. We find these settings by selecting the camera and go to the object properties data tab. That is the green camera icon in the properties panel.

In the lens section we find two settings. Clipping start and clipping end. Anything between these distances from the camera can be rendered and any object fully or partially outside this distance will be clipped fully or partially.

Adjust these settings so that all objects you intend to render are safely within this distance.

We can enable a visual guide in the 3D viewport for this distance by going to the viewport display section on the camera object data properties and check limits.

If you still have objects that does not render, you can also check so that culling isn't enabled. This is only a Cycles feature and isn't available in Eevee.

Go to the render settings tab, find the simplify section. If you have it enabled, either disable it or go to the culling subsection and make sure that camera culling and distance culling is turned off.

If you are having trouble with clipping in the viewport, you find the clipping settings for the viewport by pressing N open the left side options panel in the 3D viewport. Then navigate to the view tab and the view section. Here you will find clipping start and end values that you can adjust.

Keep in mind that if you have a huge clipping end value, let's say five thousand meters, you may have to adjust the clipping start value to a higher number or you can get artefacts on geometry in the viewport.

Final thoughts

There are quite a few ways a render can go wrong. To avoid spending a huge amount of time rendering and re-rendering, always make sure that you make a few tests first so that you know that everything is setup the way it was supposed to.

There are of course other potential problems while rendering, for instance too few light bounces, resulting in black glass or light setups that result in enormous quantities of fireflies. But those are render engine specific, so I left them out of this list.

Render safe and thanks for your time.

My top product picks for Blender artists

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Sours: https://artisticrender.com/4-common-render-problems-in-blender-and-how-to-solve-them/

[SOLVED] Blender keeps crashing on PC

Blender keeps crashing on your Windows PC? If so, you’ve come to the right place. Although it’s frustrating, the good news is that you should be able to fix this issue on your own easily after reading this article.

Try these fixes

Although the causes of Blender crashing issue vary, here we’ve put together some fixes that proved working for many Windows Blender users. Whether Blender crashes on startup or crashes when it is rendering media, you can find a fix to try in this article.

  1. Update your graphics driver
  2. Close CPU / memory hogging applications
  3. Install the latest Windows update
  4. Update / Reinstall Blender
  5. Conclusion

Fix 1: Update your graphics driver

In most cases, the broken or outdated graphics driver is the main culprit behind the Blender crashing issues.

If you haven’t updated your graphics driver for a long time, or if the graphics driver file is broken or corrupted, you may suffer from the program crashing, stuttering, and even screen flickering issues.

Graphics card manufacturers like NvidiaAMD and Intel keeps updating their graphics drivers. By doing that, they’ll fix bugs in the last version of graphics driver and enhance the graphics card performance.

You should update your drivers to see if it fixes the Blender crashing issues. If you don’t have the time, patience or skills to update the driver manually, you can do it automatically with Driver Easy.

Driver Easy will automatically recognize your system and find the correct drivers for it. You don’t need to know exactly what system your computer is running, you don’t need to be troubled by the wrong driver you would be downloading, and you don’t need to worry about making a mistake when installing. Driver Easy handles it all.

You can update your drivers automatically with either the FREE or the Pro version of Driver Easy. But with the Pro version it takes just 2 steps (and you get full support and a 30-day money back guarantee):

  1. Download and install Driver Easy.
  2. Run Driver Easy and click the Scan Now button. Driver Easy will then scan your computer and detect any problem drivers.
    Driver Easy scan now
  3. Click Update All to automatically download and install the correct version of all the drivers that are missing or out of date on your system. (This requires the Pro version – you’ll be prompted to upgrade when you click Update All.)
    Update graphics drivers with Driver Easy
    Note: You can do it for free if you like, but it’s partly manual.

Fix 2: Close CPU / memory hogging applications

Another common cause of Blender crashes is insufficient memory. If you’re running lots of applications at the same time in the background, your computer may run out of RAM and Blender may crash.

If it’s the case, closing those CPU / memory hogging applications may get Blender work again, Here is how to do it:

  1. On your keyboard, press CtrlShift and Esc at the same time to open Task Manager. You will be prompted for permission. Click Yes to open Task Manager.
  2. Select any other applications and programs that take up a large amount of CPU or memory, then click End task to close it.
    Close CPU / memory hogging applications

If Blender works well after you closed those CPU / memory hogging applications, congratulations!

To prevent Blender from crashing due to insufficient memory in the future, you may need to consider upgrading the memory (RAM) on your computer.

Fix 3: Install the latest Windows update

Microsoft constantly releases Windows updates to fix bugs and improve performance in Windows OS. If your PC is running on Windows 10 and you haven’t installed Windows update for a long time, try performing a Windows update and see if Blender crashes on the latest Windows OS.

To install the latest Windows update:

  1. On your keyboard, press the Windows logo key and I at the same time to open Windows Settings. Then click Update & Security.
    Windows 10 settings Update & Security
  2. Click Check for updates to download and install the updates available for your PC.
    Check for updates Windows 10

Restart your computer after you installed the latest Windows updates. Launch Blender and see if it crashes.

If this issue persist, try the next fix, below.

Fix 4: Update / Reinstall Blender

If none of the fixes works, try updating / reinstalling Blender. Normally, after updating Blender to the latest version, or reinstalling it, you’ll fix the crashing issue.

Conclusion

Normally, keeping Blender, Windows OS and drivers up to date would get rid of most program crashing issues. If these common fixes on this article didn’t help you fix the Blender crashing issue, you can also try investigating Windows crash logs to analyze and troubleshoot the causes of the crash. For more details, see the article: How to view crash logs in Windows 10.


Hopefully, this article helped you fix the Blender crashing issue. Feel free to drop us a line if you have any questions or suggestions. Thanks for reading!

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Sours: https://www.drivereasy.com/knowledge/solved-blender-keeps-crashing-on-pc/
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Recovering from a Blender crash

Introduction

Back in 2001 when I was learning how to program at school I remember being set a fairly large and what I thought at the time, complex, application to program. I now realise it was obviously the easiest thing you could set someone! That aside, I worked really hard on the project and ensured that I kept my work saved. At the time I was saving my work to a 3 ½ inch floppy disk which were temperamental at the best of times. It came to the night before hand-in and, you guessed it, the disk corrupted and I lost all of my work! Major nightmare and panic stations! I lost all my work and had no way of recovering it.

The story I’ve just recounted was well before the days of multiple backups, cloud storage, and recovering data that seems to be lost. Thankfully we’ve come on a long way from then. We’re going to have a look at what you can do if Blender crashes and you think you’ve lost your work, or if you’ve made some other mistake when saving your files. Blender has some nifty tools that greatly minimize the chances of you losing your work. These are obviously not controls against your Hard Drive failing or anything like that, but with the reliability of today’s hardware that’s unlikely to happy in the main. Let’s dive straight in and look at autosaved files.

Autosaved files

This is probably one of the most common ways of solving the problem of losing or not saving your current file. Blender is super helpful in that every few minutes it will autosave your project. It does this by creating a temporary back up file and saving your entire scene to that file. Blender does this as standard so there’s no need to turn it on. However, if you want to turn it off or adjust the interval times for saving then you can do that by heading into the ‘User preferences’ menu and selecting ‘File’.

Assuming you’ve got auto saving switched on then you’ll be able to open up the autosaved file by going to the ‘File’ menu followed by ‘Recover Auto Save’. This will open up a dialog box which includes a list of all your autosaved files. To make finding your file more straightforward you can use the sort tools to re-order the list by the most recent. The icon is a little calendar image just at the top of the box.

As Autosaving happens every few minutes, or by a different interval time if you’ve customized it, your backup file may not include the most recent set of changes that you made. This isn’t usually a problem as you’re generally just relieved to have your scene back in one piece even if you have to repeat the last few minute’s work.

files, software, system
files, software, system

Recovering your last session

The ability to do this comes in really handy if you accidentally quit without saving. This time the issue is more about user human error rather than the software crashing out due to either hardware or programming problems. But we’ve all been there when we’re just not thinking straight, or we think we haven’t made any changes since the last save. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve done this so I’m super grateful that Blender allows users to recover the last session.

It does this by making a backup file called ‘quit.blender’. This file is saved into your temporary directory and is only created or updated when you exit out of Blender under normal operation. This is the same directory that stores your autosave files.

To recover this file simply launch Blender back up again and when you’re faced with the initial splash screen simply click ‘Recover Last Session’. You can also access this recovery through the ‘File’ menu. This is a really neat feature that saves a lot of hassle if you’ve been too hasty at the end of your session.

files, software, system, character

You Save Over the Wrong File

I’ve not done this a huge number of times but when I have done it, whether that be in Blender or another piece of software, it has usually turned out to be extremely problematic. This is especially the case if the file I’ve overwritten is actually more valuable to me than the file I’ve overwritten it with!

Thankfully Blender is always working hard in the background and without you even noticing it Blender is keeping a backup of your two previous saved versions. This means that you’ve always got at least 2 backups to retrieve, and that’s on top of the autosave versions we’ve talked about previously.

Those files are named the same as your main file but are appended with ‘.blend1’ and ‘.blend2’. You can open these files by going to the ‘File’ menu and selecting ‘Open’. This is the same way you would open any Blender file. There’s one small difference though. You need to make sure you’ve enabled the backups filter. Once you’ve done that you should see your backups appear.

With your backup safely opened feel free to re-save over your original version if you want. Just make sure you pick the right file to override! If you’re really picky about making sure you’ve got a ton of backups then you can head into ‘User preferences’ and specify the number of backup versions that you want kept.

files, software, system

There is little more frustrating than losing your work, no matter what piece of software you happen to be using or even how much work you actually end up losing. Even losing a few hours’ worth of work leaves a bitter taste in your mouth. It’s important to familiarize yourself with these recovery tools to help reduce the frustration next time either you make a mistake or Blender crashes out.

Sours: https://3dtotal.com/tutorials/t/recovering-from-a-blender-crash
Blender Crash/Freeze while baking or rendering fix!

Crashes¶

The most common causes of Blender crashes:

  • Running out of memory.

  • Issues with graphics hardware or drivers.

  • Bugs in Blender.

Firstly, you may be able to recover your work with .

To prevent the problem from happening again, you can check that the graphics drivers are up to date (Graphics Hardware), upgrade your machine’s hardware (the RAM or graphics card), and disable some options that are more memory intensive:

  • Reduce undo steps .

  • Using multisample anti-aliasing also increases the memory usage and makes the display slower.

  • On Linux, the Window Manager (KDE and Gnome for example) may be using hardware accelerated effects (e.g. window shadows and transparency) that are using up the memory that Blender needs. Try disabling the desktop effects or switch to a lightweight Window Manager.

To check memory usage by Blender:

  • On Windows, use Task Manager and sort by Memory.

  • On macOS, use Activity Monitor.app and open Memory tab. Alternatively, run .

  • On Linux, run .

Crash Log¶

When Blender crashes, it writes out a text file which contains information that may help identify the cause of the crash. Usually, this file is written in the Temporary Directory directory.

This file contains a log of tools used up until the crash as well as some other debug information. When reporting bugs about crashes it can be helpful to attach this file to your reports, especially when others are unable to reproduce the crash.

Windows¶

On a crash, a file is written based on the name of the currently loaded blend-file, so will create a file called .

Batch scripts are provided in Blender installation directory which may be run to obtain the Blender debug log and system info text files:

  • is used in most cases.

  • and log GPU-related errors.

  • starts Blender with default settings which is recommended for debugging.

If the crash happens in Blender module, stack trace is also written to a file named . The path to that file can be found at the end of file.

macOS¶

After crash, macOS Crash Reporter shows a window after some time, or next time Blender is opened. Copy the text in the crash report and save it in a text file. That file should be attached to the bug report.


© Copyright : This page is licensed under a CC-BY-SA 4.0 Int. License. Last updated on 10/18/2021.

Sours: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/latest/troubleshooting/crash.html

Crash blender

Crashes¶

The most common causes of Blender crashes:

  • Running out of memory.
  • Issues with graphics hardware or drivers.
  • Bugs in Blender.

Firstly, you may be able to recover your work with .

To prevent the problem from happening again, you can check that the graphics drivers are up to date, upgrade your machine’s hardware (the RAM or graphics card), and disable some options that are more memory intensive:

  • Reduce undo steps .
  • Disable Region Overlap and Triple buffering at .
  • Using multisample, anti-aliasing also increases the memory usage and makes the display slower.
  • On Linux, the Window Manager (KDE, Gnome, Unity) may be using hardware accelerated effects (e.g. window shadows and transparency) that are using up the memory that Blender needs. Try disabling the desktop effects or switch to a lightweight Window Manager.

Crash Log¶

When Blender crashes, it writes out a text file which contains information that may help identify the cause of the crash.

On a crash, a file is written based on the name of the currently loaded blend-file, so will create a file called . The crash log for unsaved files will be written into the Temporary Directory directory.

This file contains a log of tools used up until the crash as well as some other debug information.

When reporting bugs on crashes it can be helpful to attach this file to your reports, especially when others are unable to reproduce the crash.

Warning

This is currently disabled for MS-Windows.

Sours: https://docs.blender.org/manual/en/2.79/troubleshooting/crash.html
Blender Crash/Freeze while baking or rendering fix!

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