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14 Homemade Survival Weapons: How to Make Your Own Makeshift or DIY Self Defense Weapon (Easy to Create)

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Survival Weapons & Homemade Weapons enhance your ability to defend yourself when dealing with danger during a home invasion, disaster, or emergency, aside from storing up on bulk food and other survival items of course (like these).

You may find yourself in a situation one day where homemade weapons are necessary to survive a disaster at home or outdoors.

Here are 14 homemade weapons that are not only useful, but simple to make, and can come in handy for a variety of survival situations.

Homemade projects like these can be a fun, sobering survival life hack to add to your next DIY project.

Make it a goal to take one of these on and see what you can make from the items you already have at home.

More helpful reading:

Table of Contents

1. Naginata

Have you ever watched a Chinese movie where the Samurai warriors wielded staves with long blades attached at the tips?

A Naginata is an ancient Chinese weapon that’s made by drilling and attaching a blade about one foot in length to a wooden staff. This weapon enables a fighter to inflict serious cuts or stabs from a safe distance compared to using a sword.

How to make a homemade Naginata

For these homemade weapons, you’ll need an old hockey stick, a couple of 6-inch screw bolts, an electric drill, and a machete. Better if you can look up videos on YouTube to see it for yourself.

1. Get an old hockey stick and use a saw to chop off the curved part. You need a straight surface to attach your blade.

2. Dismantle your machete’s plastic handle using a screwdriver. Align your machete at the tip of your hockey stick where you’ll drill the holes for your 6-inch screw bolts.

3. Place the hockey stick on a flat surface, preferably a workbench, because you’ll drill holes to attach your blade. Use a drill and create two small holes that can accommodate your 6-inch screw bolts.

4. Pass the screw bolts through the holes that attached your machete to its original handle. You might need a 6-inch wrench to prevent your machete from wobbling while in use.  And there you go, instant homemade weapons!

Naginata Pros

1. These DIY badass weapons can double up as a spear while hunting deer and wild boars.

2. No special training or maintenance is required to operate a Naginatas as these are self-defense weapons.

3.This survival gear keeps off enemies at a safe distance

2. War hammer

In the Medieval era, soldiers relied on weapons such as war hammers to maim soldiers wearing chest plates and other forms of protective metal armor.

This weapon is easy to use and requires no maintenance.

These are the perfect kind of weapons to add to your next DIY pocket tools and weapons list. Make homemade weapons like these and level up your survival gear using these items:

  • Old hockey stick
  • U-bolt
  • Two weight plates weighing 2 pounds each.
  • Saw

Instructions

1. Use a saw to chop off the curved part of your hockey stick because you need a vertical surface to attach your weight plates.

2. Place the tip of your hockey stick between the two weight plates. Make sure the plates are perfectly aligned to ensure proper weight distribution.

3. Insert the U-bolt through your weight plates then fasten as tight as possible.

4. In case the weights are wobbly, get an extra U-bolt to apply a tighter grip.

Pros of using a homemade war hammer

1. You can use it to break locks and rescue people locked inside rooms. Weapons like these can be a useful part of your survival gear and come in handy to for survival.

2. A War Hammer enables you to fight off machete attacks by using overwhelming force to dislodge the blade from your attacker’s hand. Diy badass weapons like war hammers are weapons you can make easily at home.

3. It is highly portable which is crucial during fight or flight situations. This self-defense weapon sometimes is a handy resource for survival defense.

3. Medieval Sling

Weapons like medieval slings enhance your impact and precision while aiming at targets within a range of 200 feet. You can use weapons like these for hunting or self-defense because they’re highly portable and discreet compared to a Naginata or other war hammer designs.

Level up your homemade and DIY weapons with this convenient and badass weapon by adding it to your upcoming projects. You’ll need the following items to make homemade weapons like a medieval sling at home.

  • 3-meters of paracord
  • Old canvas or leather shoes
  • A pair of sharp scissors
  • 0.5 meter of plastic thread
  • Masking tape

Instructions

1. Take the paracord and fold it into half then tie the tips firmly.

2. Straighten out your paracord then mark the center with a strip of masking tape.

3. Take out your pair of scissors and use them to cut a rectangular piece measuring 3X3 inches. Cut the material from the tongue of your canvas or leather shoe.

4. Use the tip of your scissors to drill small holes near the vertical edges of your rectangle. The holes should be just wide enough for the paracord to pass through everything.

5. Place the rectangular strip at the center where you marked with masking tape. Next, cut the paracord on either side of your rectangle and insert the strings through the holes drilled previously using the tip of your scissors.

6. Fasten your paracord around your rectangle by tying the plastic thread on both sides. Make sure the thread is tight to prevent your rock or marbles from slipping.

Pros of using a medieval sling

1. Weapons like these increases the availability of projectiles because it uses small rocks, marbles, and ball bearings.

2. These homemade and badass weapons are easy to repel a group of attackers when you have two or more people on your team using medieval slings.

Cons of using a medieval sling

1. You have to use these weapons while standing which can be inefficient when trying to attack an enemy discreetly.

2. Aiming and swinging at a target can be difficult if you’re dealing with targets approaching at high speeds.

4. Bola

A bola is a modified medieval sling that’s used to trip large animals or opponents rushing towards or away from you. It works by constricting the target’s legs abruptly while in motion.

Fortunately, creating a bola requires very simple items and you can make it in less than five minutes.

Make these homemade weapons and be a diy genius with these materials:

  • Three rocks that are evenly shaped
  • Two meters or 6.5 ft of paracord
  • A separate one and a half meters of paracord

How to make homemade bola

1. Take two rocks and tie each one to the tips of your two-meter paracord.

2. Tie the third rock at the tip of your one and a half meter paracord.

3. Tie the separate paracord at the center of your two-meter paracord. Your Bola should have the center rock hanging lower than the rest.

Pros of using a Bola

1. It’s an effective long-distance homemade weapon for bringing down large prey with strong legs.

2. Badass homemade weapons like the Bola are easy to change the rocks on so you can take down targets of varying physical sizes.

Cons

1. This weapons requires lots of hours in training to be precise.

2. Weapons like these only works within short ranges which can be a major shortfall when hunting animals from a distance.

5. Spear

A spear is one of the best survival homemade weapons to have in your home or outdoors because it’s quite versatile. You can use these homemade weapons to fish when standing at river banks or while on boat rides. It also helps you attack your opponents effectively while maintaining a safe distance.

Spears are one of the perfect homemade weapons you can make. Your chances for survival are higher when you are able to defend yourself with some type of homemade weapon. Make one of these survival life hacks or projects and let’s look at the items required to make at home:

  • A stiff wooden pole approximately one and a half meters in length

Optional items for projects like these:

How to make a homemade spear

1. Take your survival knife and use it to create a pointed tip by shaving off the edges near the top.

2. Place the sharp point over a fire while rotating it frequently to harden the tip. This will make it highly durable in high-impact situations.

3. If you want to create a spear with a steel blade, you’ll split the top part of your wooden pole horizontally to a depth of 6 inches.

4. Shape the scrap metal into a wide arrow-head shape then insert the bottom part into the wooden pole.

5. Fasten the blade by tying up wood at the horizontal split using a paracord. There you have it, easy homemade weapons!

Homemade and DIY Spear benefits

1. These homemade weapons are effective in hunting big prey.

2. You can use these homemade weapons during combat to fend off attackers coming from multiple directions.

3. You can use these homemade and diy weapons like a Naginata to overpower attackers with swords or machetes.

Cons

1. You can only use one spear at a time and this makes it ineffective when faced with a group of attackers.

2. It requires some practice to learn how to balance the spear before launching it towards a target. Better to visit youtube com watch v and watch videos on how to use these really badass weapons.

6. Bow & Arrow

Bow and arrows are weapons that can help you repel a group of attackers by yourself. They’re also discreet weapons that you can use to execute long-range attacks thanks to its silence, unlike firing a gun. Plus, arrows fly at high speeds which makes them effective for taking out big targets by either maiming them or targeting body parts that are next to vital organs.

Homemade weapons like bows and arrows are perfect weapons to add to your next diy weapons to make at home. These are the materials needed to make these homemade weapons:

  • A sapling that’s 1-2 inches thick in diameter
  • 10-foot paracord
  • Survival knife
  • A pocket tool

How to make a homemade bow & arrow

1. Carefully chop off the sapling and shave off any branches using your survival knife.

2. Use the survival knife to shave the side facing towards you. Leave the unshaved side facing outwards or towards your target. This ensures that your homemade bow bends continuously without breaking.

3. Sharpen the tips on both sides because it’s where you’ll tie the bowstring or paracord.

4. Use the saw in your pocket tool to carve notches at both tips of your bow. The notches should be one-inch deep.

5. Tie the paracord tightly on both sides then lay your bow on the ground. Grab the center of your bowstring then pull upwards to see whether both ends rise together uniformly.

6. As for the arrows, it’s easier to purchase them online because it’s easy to distort streamlining when making arrows for the first time.

Cons of using bow and arrows

1. This popular ‘zombie weapon’ requires rigorous practice to master precision

2. Making arrows can be a time-consuming process, especially if they’re homemade weapons.

3. Bows and arrows are conspicuous and this makes it hard to carry these homemade weapons discreetly.

7. Pepper Sprays

This is a compact survival weapon that an individual can use to disarm one or two attackers simultaneously. The fact that one can hide it up their sleeves makes it possible to use the element of surprise when cornered or while in confined spaces such as public transport. It’s best to keep 2 homemade pepper spray to be sure.

Make these homemade weapons at home for a perfect weapon fitted to add to your arsenal, here’s a brief list of the items that you’ll need for these homemade weapons:

  • A 100ml spray bottle
  • Rubbing alcohol
  • Two clean bowls
  • 4 tablespoons of chili powders or black pepper
  • A plastic/metal kitchen strainer
  • Two tablespoons of coconut/olive oil

How to make a homemade pepper spray

1. Put the chili powder into a clean bowl then pour in your rubbing alcohol gradually. Your chili powder should remain partially afloat in the mixture. Cover with a clean napkin and let it soak for eight hours for the chili powder to saturate.

2. Add the two tablespoons of coconut or olive oil to increase your pepper spray’s density. This ensures that the mixture shoots directly towards your target even when it’s windy.

3. Carefully sieve the mixture into a clean bowl using your kitchen strainer to trap the solid particles.

4. Pour the homemade chili solution into a dry 100ml spray bottle then test it on your leg.

5. Store your homemade chili peppers weapons in a cool and dry place to enhance its longevity. These homemade weapons are essential especially when leaving the house late at night.

Cons of using pepper spray

1. This homemade black paper spray ineffective when dealing with attackers wearing face shields

2. Homemade weapons such as these only work effectively when the enemy is within a six-foot range

8. Slingshot

A slingshot is a compact DIY weapon that enhances one’s ability to hit targets situated within a range of up to 250 feet. Just like the medieval sling, it has a variety of “ammunition” such as ball bearings, marbles, and pebbles. It also requires little training and easy to use for both children and adults. Better to visit www youtube com watch videos on how to make it.

How to make a homemade slingshot

This famous bachete zombie weapon is best to add to your arsenal firearms collection. Get these five items to make a slingshot at home.

  • A thick fork of branches that has a 2-3 inch diameter
  • An old leather shoe
  • Rubber band
  • A pair of scissors
  • 1 meter of plastic thread

1. Cut the rubber band into two equal strips that are eight inches in length and three inches wide.

2. Grab the tongue of your old leather shoe then cut off a rectangular strip measuring 3X3 inches. Use the tip of your scissors to drill two small holes near the vertical sides of the rectangle.

3. Fasten the rubber band strips on both holes of the leather strip. Use bits of plastic thread to firmly tighten the ends so that your rocks don’t slip while pulling the slingshot.

4. Tie the loose ends of the rubber strips to the prongs of your fork using plastic thread. Hold the slingshot and stretch it out to test whether the rubber strips are fastened tightly.

Cons of using a slingshot

1. It fires only one shot at a time, making it hard to hit a fast-moving target.

2. It cannot deliver a strong impact when hitting targets within a range of 10 feet, especially when they’re just diy weapons.

9. Kubaton

A kubaton, or pen guns, is a 6-inch pen that’s attached to a keychain and used to deliver sharp strikes in close combat. It resembles a survival tactical pen and you rarely have to declare it as a weapon when passing through airport security. Kubatons also catch attackers by surprise because they mistake it for harmless Sharpies.

Steps in making homemade Kubaton

You can make these homemade weapons using a metal pen, pair of scissors, and some Gorilla Black Duct Tape. The next step is going on Google then download an image of a survival pen. This will help you pattern grip contours that fit perfectly into your hands because it’s important to maintain a firm grip while striking attackers.  Perfect homemade weapons to add to your arsenal to keep you safe from all walks of life.

Cut different sizes of grip material from the Gorilla Black Duct tape. Next, drill a small hole at the top that’s just wide enough for your keychain to fit. YouTube has plenty of useful tutorials on how you can use a Kubaton in different situations.

Cons of using a Kubaton

1. Firearms like these require several hours of training for one to master quick and effective strikes.

2. It only works best when the enemy is within arms reach, according to firearms experts.

10. Throwing Stars

Throwing stars or Shurikens are ideal for hunting as well as self-defense because they’re discreet and sharp. They’re also lightweight and this makes it possible to carry tens of them at once.

Steps in making homemade Shurikens

Level up your badass homemade weapons building with these really badass 2nd edition survival weapons. This homemade project requires the following items.

1. A printer

2. A4 paper

3. Axle grinder

4. A pair of scissors

5. Spray paint

6. Workbench

7. Drill

8.Bench grinder

9. A pair of safety gloves

10. A file

11. Old shovel or block of metal that’s one inch thick.

Instructions

1. Go online or on www youtube com watch a video and search for a shuriken image then print it on an A4 paper. Cut the image out using a pair of scissors.

2. Clean and dry your shovel or block of metal then use some adhesive to stick your image.

3. Spray some paint all over the image to form a stencil. Position the metal on a vice grip and use an axle grinder to cut metal around your stencil. Make sure you wear welding goggles to avoid eye damage from intense light and flying sparks.

4. Wait for the metal to cool down then wear safety gloves before switching on the bench grinder. This machine helps you to smoothen out rough edges.

5. Use a Sharpie pen to mark out holes prior to drilling. Make sure you use a workbench for the best stability.

6. Take your file and use it to sharpen the edges. You can test the sharpness of your shuriken by aiming at watermelons.

Limitations when it comes to using shurikens

1. One needs safety gloves because the sharp edges from the saw blade inflict nasty cuts on the hand when throwing them.

11. Taser

A taser produces high-voltage electricity that’s sufficient to overwhelm an attacker instantly. Its small size gives the owner an edge in attacking by surprise because it can disappear under the sleeves.

How to make your own homemade taser at home

Have homemade weapons like taser guns can also act as a pump-action rocket gun that can save you from danger. Go to youtube com watch videos and here’s a list of requirements to make a homemade taser gun:

Instructions

1.Add wires on your positive and negative battery terminals to extend the terminals. Then, connect the negative terminal of your battery to the transformer. The wire should connect to your transformer’s negative terminal.

2. Use a soldering iron to attach the wire running from your battery’s positive terminal to the switch. You’ll need some wire to connect a button that activates and switches your taser. This wire connects the button to your battery’s positive terminal.

3. Take your red LED light and a couple of wires measuring 2-3 inches. Use your soldering iron and a piece of the wire to connect your LED light to the switch. Then, take the other wire and use it to connect the battery’s negative terminal with your LED light. This light helps you to tell whether the taser is on or off.

4. Take the red and black wires and connect them to your battery’s terminals to ensure the flow of current takes place while recharging. Make sure you connect the red wire with the other red wire connected to your battery to avoid short circuits.

5. You might need some extra wire to extend the terminals on your transformer. Add about two inches of wire on each terminal then coil up a nail on each end. Next, get a piece of tough plastic then drill two small holes that will keep the nails separate at a distance of five millimeters.

6. Get one of the old laptop charger shells and dismantle it carefully using a screwdriver as a wedge. You’ll need to draw a schematic to help you identify where to position each part inside the laptop charger shell. Chop up the popsicles to create reinforcements for buttons and spacings for wires.

7. Use Loctite super glue to seal your housing then smoothen out the rough edges with sandpaper.

12. Sound Bomb

Weapons such as sound bombs help in diverting an enemy’s attention temporarily to create a window of opportunity for either fleeing or deploying an offensive strategy. It’s easy to create this weapon at home by gathering the following items.

How to make a homemade weapon like a sound bomb

1. Take the plastic bottle and pour in vinegar until it’s quarter-way full.

2. Spread out the napkin then scoop four tablespoons of baking soda and pour it vertically. Next, roll up the baking soda tightly while tucking the top and bottom.

3. Carefully put the rolled napkin with baking soda inside your plastic bottle and ensure the lid is tight. Shake the bottle vigorously until it begins expanding rapidly then toss it towards your target.

4. The bottle will explode loudly and pieces of flying plastic can cause serious facial injuries.

13. Rocket launcher

A rocket launcher is effective homemade weapons in neutralizing or scaring off a group of attackers. It’s also easy to blow up obstacles blocking your path using a rocket launcher.

How to make a homemade rocket launcher

Below are the requirements for this homemade weapon

  • Two paper towel cardboard rolls

1. Get an A4 size paper and shape it into a cone. Use your hot glue to seal the edges then use a pair of scissors to chop off the apex or tip of the cone

2. Take the cardboard tube and apply hot glue on one end. Turn the tip apex of your cone upside down and carefully stick it inside the cardboard. This design enhances stability when launching the rocket.

3. Chop off half of the second cardboard roll then use hot glue to attach it firmly below the rocket launcher. Place the chopped cardboard at the center because it serves as the weapon’s handle.

4. Repeat step 1 by taking another A4 and rolling it into a cone then chopping off the apex.  Take your fireworks shell then fit it inside your apex to form the arrowhead of the rocket.

5. Next, take another A4 paper and roll it into a cylinder that will fit on the fireworks shell’s base. Your rocket should resemble a spear.

6. Take the rocket and place it inside the launcher. The arrowhead should stick out with a small rope dangling below. This is the fuse that you’ll light when launching the rocket at an attacker or obstacle.

14. PVC Pipe Gun

These homemade weapons, known as zip gun, stun gun, or submachine gun, is useful in mounting an attack against an attacker within a range of 12 feet. It fires off metal bits that can cause serious facial and neck injuries.

How to make a PVC pipe gun at home

Here’s a list of items required for this project for this PVC pipe compound bow for your next homemade weapons.

  • 1 PVC pipe compound that’s 0.5 meters in length and a diameter of 2-3 inches
  • A set of six 1-inch screws

Instructions

1. Use a tape measure to cut a four-inch section from the 1 PVC pipe compound bow and repeat it. Next, use a hot knife to cut out rectangular shapes measuring 2X2 inches on these PVC pipes. Cut each pipe vertically from the top because this is where you’ll attach the larger PVC.

2. Take a lighter and heat up your screwdriver to create holes for extra reinforcement. Place the larger PVC pipe compound bow get between the rectangular shapes on the 4-inch pipes. Reinforce the handle using your one-inch screws and the screwdriver.

3. Take the old metal hanger and measure about six inches then cut using a pair of pliers. Bend the six-inch section into a U-shape then use your pliers to form loops on both vertical sides of your wire. This is your trigger for launching projectiles.

4. Take the wire and a couple of screws to reinforce the trigger on your zip guns. You’ll need a hot screwdriver to create holes for your one-inch screws. Reinforce the trigger on both sides using the screws but leave enough space for the trigger to move back and forth.

5. Drill a small hole four inches away from the trigger and put in a screw. Take a rubber band and fasten it on this screw as well as those supporting your trigger. The rubber band provides tension for the trigger to launch projectiles at long distances.

6. Take a couple of screws then secure them on opposite sides an inch below the muzzle of your pipe gun. Take a rubber band and fasten it around the screws then pull it all the way to your trigger. Make sure it’s tense but not overly tight to prevent it from snapping while in use.

7. You can create projectiles by cutting bits of wire from the metal hanger. Cut about two inches then bend them to a 90 degrees angle. Load the projectile on the rubber band close to your muzzle then pull and secure it behind the trigger.

8. Aim at targets then pull the trigger to shoot. Exercise caution by shooting your PVC pipe compound bow get gun away from humans and pets. And there you have it, a stun gun or submachine gun that’s homemade and easy and can be of use as homemade firearms.

15. Spiked Bat

A spiked bat inflicts high-impact damage because the pointed edges stab and tear victims. There are various types of bats — viking looking rebar axe, saw blade, or the ones made of PVC pipe. If you’d like, you can search up online for rebar axe tutorial and viking looking rebar axe.

It’s really easy to make a homemade one at home using an old baseball bat, a hammer, and a set of six-inch nails.

How to make a homemade spiked bat

1. Take the nails and hammer them through the barrel of your baseball bat to make one.

Make Your Survival Weapon Today

Owning a DIY weapon can enable you to neutralize attackers and protect your loved ones before the police arrive in the rescue. Make sure to prevent harming yourself — better to prepare 12 gauge, or other first aid items, and visit Youtube com watch videos for additional information, such as Douglas computing, weapons made of pipe, collection chain store, or even rebar axe tutorial. When you look at these homemade and DIY weapons, you’ll realize that most of the items are available in your home or at Walmart.

Pick any of these 14 badass homemade weapons and tackle the project with your friends or family and you won’t regret it. Leave a reply to know more about these 14 homemade weapons for the 2nd edition survival life ideas.

Sours: https://survivalistgear.co/homemade-survival-weapons/
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Dustin Faulkner






Location: BOERNE, TX
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Reece Nelson






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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 9:31 pm    Post subject: hammer         Reply with quote

Very nice! I really like weapons that have that simple and functional look. Nothing fancy...just straight to the point (literally) :P
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Craig L.







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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 10:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice job, Dustin -- looks quite handy!

Cheers,
Craig
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Christopher VaughnStrever






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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan, 2010 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have had similar interests, though this is a very nice item to see;of what one can do at his home (sort to speak)
Experience and learning from such defines maturity, not a number of age
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Pauli Vennervirta







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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.
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Arne Focke


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 7:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice work.

The words you were looking for in German are "Kriegshammer" or "Streithammer".
In this case i would use "Rabenschnabel", because of its beak.
So schön und inhaltsreich der Beruf eines Archäologen ist, so hart ist auch seine Arbeit, die keinen Achtstundentag kennt! (Wolfgang Kimmig in: Die Heuneburg an der oberen Donau, Stuttgart 1983)
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Sean Flynt


myArmoury Team


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Stephen Renico






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JG Elmslie


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 2:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pauli Vennervirta wrote:
What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.


that's almost exactly what I used for doing a prototype for a pole-hammer; stock removal to cut down the head and deepen the lightning cuts, and then waist in and facet the back-spike (well, back-spoon, really - rounded to avoid a point for reenactment). Having had the whole thing cut to shape, polished, etc, the plan is/was to try it out for a little while, and then to cast it up in an RTV rubber mould, make lost-wax castings from the moulds, and have them investment cast in carbon steel, and then hand-worked and finished off and stuck to hafts.

A plan as cunning as a fox with a degree in cunning, from oxford, only mildly undermined by the fact my local lumber-yard's been out of ash hafts for the last two months, and its therefore sitting gathering dust, while I wait for them to get some in.
Not that I could use it just now, given the weather... and a shoulder that's wonky in the cold.


regarding Mr Dustin Faulkner's original peice, I think what jumps out at me, is that the handle is far too modern in appearance. take the head, pop it onto a straight, octagonal section haft with wooden langet straps running down the two sides, and I think it'd go from "ok" to pretty damn good.
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Todd Webber







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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 2:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am going attempt to make a similar project over the next few weeks. I am wondering if there are any methods to “antique” the hammer head?

I am going to sand and use linseed oil of the shaft.
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Julian Reynolds






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Ron Reuter






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JG Elmslie


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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julian Reynolds wrote:
JG Elmslie, can I make a suggestion?

For ash axe hafts, I just buy a load of cricket stumps. Straight grained English ash, 28" long, 1 1/4" min. diameter. I can pick up half a dozen for just over £20 (less if I scour the junk shops). I use them to make hafts for the tomahawk and boarding axe simulators I make for the WMA guys.

Julian


that is,as they say, dead cunning. I'll remember that for small sections of ash - thankyou.
I rather like the simulators you're doing there. Are those cast in RTV silicone, or the likes?


Regarding buying such hafts of course, there's just one little technical flaw...
I'm scottish. where can you find this "cricket" thing you talk about? Happy
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Julian Reynolds






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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 1:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Silicone is for wimps - they're made from hardwood (iroko, beech, whatever I have lots of at the time) sprayed black.

They're tough, effective, look authentic/traditional at 20 paces and hurt a lot less than a re-enactment metal blunt. I use them for 18th Century WMA/reenactment because you aren't wearing any sort of armour or protection (no plate or shields, for instance) at this time in history and therefore a metal blunt would just cause massive damage if it accidentally connected with sufficient force.....

Anyway, I risk hijacking this thread so I'll sign off....

Julian
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Stephen Wheatley






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Scott Jefcoats






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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 11:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Historically would the langets have gone under the head? I heard somewhere they went over the head to hold it on, but i dunno if the guy was right. I'm intrigued.
Thnx
Z
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Ron Reuter






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PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2010 4:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Zach Gordon wrote:
Historically would the langets have gone under the head? I heard somewhere they went over the head to hold it on, but i dunno if the guy was right. I'm intrigued.
Thnx
Z


I didn't mean to imply that my method was historic, it is probably not. I wanted to add langets to it, and this was an easy way for me to finish them at the hammer head end. Even this method, though, would protect the wood handle from some strikes.

Ron
www.yeoldegaffers.com
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Scott Jefcoats






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PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2010 8:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't have a picture but I have created a graphic that I hope will show the method I used. The langets don't fit under the head. I bent them a bit so that they curved at the end, and then carved the wood a bit so that it appears that they disappear under the head. They are just actually butted up against the head.

Thanks Ron Happy .
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Are you a tabletop miniature gamer? The battlefield you play on might be a dining room table, but it should be more. That’s where terrain pieces come into play. If you’re playing games like Warhammer 40k and looking for terrain ideas, all it takes is an online search. Images of beautiful wargaming terrain are everywhere. But, if you want to make your own wargaming terrain without breaking the bank or spending a lot of time,here are a few great ways to do it.

In this article, I show you 3 fun and easy ways to make terrain for tabletop wargames and roleplaying games (RPGs), like Dungeon and Dragons or Warhammer 40k.


How to Decide What Terrain to Make?

Consider space and time.

The approach I’m using is made primarily for the Warhammer 40k terrain boards for an urban city environment. The basic principle is the same, however, across a variety of game types.

Terrain for wargames can span the gamut. History and place (anywhere in the imagined Universe, really) is open to a creative approach for terrain for wargaming.

RELATED: 20 GREAT TABLETOP TERRAIN PIECES FOR WARGAMES AND RPGS ON ETSY

Buildings are just one way to setup a board for a tabletop wargame. Terrain DIY style is great because it is free-form.

Ultimately, when it comes to making your own terrain for a tabletop game, you’re only limited by your ideas. If you have a vision for how you want your battles to play out, you don’t need to spend a lot of money.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - cardboard house

Here, all you need is to grasp the idea that your battlefields exist in a space (the actual world) and the time period (whether this is a fictional or simulated actual history).

As with choosing a color scheme, deciding what wargaming terrain to make is simply starting with an idea.

Then, with this spark, you can go through the process of what you want to make.


3 Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain

Here are the 3 approaches you can use to make your own wargaming terrain:

  1. Follow reference images from books and papercraft instructables
  2. Use 3D printing and modeling software
  3. Improvise by scratch building and kitbashing

1. Follow Reference Images, Photos, Books, and Papercraft

A lot of what you do in the modeling and miniature hobby arises from admiring all the work you find out there. The internet is chock-full of ideas and beautiful art.

You can see my Pinterest board with the things I’ve found inspirational for terrain pieces. Terrain making is an art!

READ MORE: DOWNLOAD FREE PAPERCRAFT TERRAIN

Reference photos and books

The other way that can help you decide what terrain pieces to make is to use books. There are ton of books on the internet about wargaming and the art of making terrain.

For example, the book entitled “Wargames Terrain & Buildings: The Napoleonic Wars” is an excellent example of an instructional and reference for scratch building terrain buildings.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - historical book reference for gaming terrain and landscape modeling

The book is all about scratch building terrain for a tabletop wargame. Although the period in history is a bit different than the dark grim style of the Warhammer 40k Universe, or other sci-fi genre, the basic principles for terrain making are the same.

The photos inside the book are top-notch. And, I love flipping through the step-by-step guide just to spawn new ideas.

The book is filled with terrain making techniques, including what to build, what materials to use, including glues (I’ve been fascinated by glues), and general best practice for handling challenging builds.

Again, although you will find the history time period a bit different than what you might be lookin for in a game of Infinity, Warhammer, or any of the fictional war games we enjoy, the underlying ideas are the same.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - miniature battlefields for RPGs and realistic wargames

Finally, as mentioned, you can certainly find a ton of references with simple online searches.

Once you find something you like, you merely take some of the basic techniques from these books or other tutorials and create the pieces.

When it comes to homemade terrain, I like taking the easy route (see more about improvising terrain making below).

Make Papercraft Terrain

Along with using found materials and reference guides, you can download paper crafted terrain from various places on the internet.

What is paper craft?

Paper craft is an art form that uses paper or card-stock to create three-dimensional objects. Paper craft is another name for a paper sculpture.

For making terrain, there are various ways you can use paper craft. There are pre-printed plans that you can find online. Here’s a site that sells papercraft terrain (see DriveThruRPG). The site also sells 3D printable files of terrain and buildings, too.

This Paper Terrain site sells some really cool historical paper terrain.

If you’re looking for free paper craft tabletop terrain, there’s a huge amount listed here and here and here.

DriveThruRPG.com

Of course, in paper craft there is some assembly required. In some cases, you may also need to color in the paper after you print them.

But, in general, paper craft is a very budget friendly way to get awesome looking wargaming terrain on your table.

It is certainly a step above DIY options, but still has the build and assembly aspect that many hobbyists enjoy.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free)

Obviously, you’ll need a printer and good paper or card stock to make paper craft terrain. I can recommend these printers for card stock.

Best printer for papercraft terrain?

I have the Canon Pixma Pro-100 and print stencils (for airbrushing) and other paper-based things on it, including DIY cardstock terrain. These are 3 of the best printers for cardstock.

If you’re looking to buy an ink jet printer, or upgrade, this is probably more than you need. There are budget-friendly printers on the market. They all produce excellent color, print fast, and work with heavy-weight card stock.

Card stock is a paper product that is more rigid that regular computer paper. You’ll want to print on cardstock to make your buildings stand up properly. Card stock is affordable, too.

The terrain and buildings will also last longer if you print on card stock.

See the images below of what you can do with a good ink jet printer and some card stock (this are paper Dave Graffam models).

2. Use 3D Printing and Modeling Software

The method I have used in the past for deciding what to make has been with 3D modeling software.

There are 2 ways you can use 3D modeling software for making terrain:

  • Download pre-made building or terrain files (and modify them)
  • Model the building in 3D from scratch

To actually make the terrain buildings with 3D digital models, you either 1) download the files for 3D printing (if you have a 3D printer), or 2) use the 3D models as a blue print for scratch building with available materials.

When you want to download pre-made buildings and terrain you merely have do an online search.

There are ton of free 3D files for you to browse on Thingiverse. All you have to do is type in the search bar is “wargaming terrain”.

Ways to Make DIY Wargaming Terrain: Overview

And, this is an example of what you may get….

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3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - painted 3d printed terrain
3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - gaming terrain 3d printing

If you’re looking for professionally made 3D terrain and building files, you can check out this site “Drive Thru RPG”.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free)

In general, making terrain with 3D modeling and printers is the more technical and recent development in terrain making.

But, if you pick up the skill and knowledge with working with 3D models (it’s not hard; more about it below), then you’ve got an awesome way to take advantage of all the creativity that people have shared online.

You’re just a few clicks away from downloading some amazing terrain pieces.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - board game terrain
3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - 3d printed warhammer 40k terrain urban

RELATED: IS 3D PRINTING GAME MODELS PIRACY?

3D modeling software: my recommendation and thoughts for designing your own terrain and buildings.

Let’s say you wanted to make your own terrain pieces with modeling software. In this case, there are another host of options.

But, I’ll narrow it down to the easiest and most budget friendly app for almost any terrain making needs.

In whatever scenario you’re looking for, my two favorite apps for creating 3D files of buildings and wargaming terrain are SketchUp and Fusion 360.

Both are free!

Importantly, there are a great tutorials on YouTube. Using videos from YouTube was the best way I learned how to 3D model.

By the way, I talk about Fusion 360 in another article for making custom model bases.

3D modeling for terrain and buildings

If you’re looking for the simplest and best software for 3D modeling buildings, my recommendation is to first try SketchUp.

The software is free for use online. There is a desktop app for Sketchup, but it’s limited unless you pay for the pro version.

For students and educators, the professional version is free. I’ve used both the free version and pro version, and for the simple buildings either is fine.

Here are a few examples of efforts trying to make buildings for Infinity the Miniatures Game.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - sketchup 3d modeling software
3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - render 3d software
3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - 3d modeling a house terrain

The result of 3D printing terrain is based on quality of the 3D file. I have some work ahead of me to get my designs ready for the printer. But, you get the idea.

Software 3D modeling can get you pretty far along in the terrain design phase.

Below are some examples of 3D models that I printed from a Kickstarter Campaign that had rewards with 3D files of terrain pieces. You can check out Thunder Chrome 3D printable terrain pieces here.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - 3d printed FDM model for infinity miniatures

By the way, Amazon even sells 3D printed terrain from different vendors, which are cheaper than a lot of the plastic model kits you might find. Though, you should shop for the better quality pieces. Here’s what’s available now.

RELATED: HOW TO SMOOTH PLA 3D PRINTED PARTS

The cool thing about using 3D modeling software is that it’s scalable. It doesn’t matter if you’re playing a large 28mm scale game, or the smaller epic scale stuff like epic 40k or Dropzone Commander.

With 3D files, you can enlarge or shrink terrain pieces for these miniature tabletop games as needed. Just be aware that at a certain point, the size of the details will determine whether they will appear properly on your 3D printed piece.


3. Improvise by Scratch Building and Kitbashing

I think this how most people who start tabletop gaming get their terrain.

It’s fun and easy. As I mentioned, I tend to go on Pinterest to collect ideas for making DIY wargaming terrain.

Now, there are a ton of ways you can take found material around your home, or workplace, and turn it into useful terrain and buildings.

3 Awesome Ways to Make Wargaming Terrain (Cheap, Easy, and Free) - low cost cheap DIY wargaming terrain for Warhammer 40k, Age of Sigmar, and other tabletop games, DND terrain making, dungeon and dragon terrain for RPG - raw materials for DIY terrain

In terms of what you need to jump in, you won’t need too much. Obviously, I’m assuming that most of the material you will use are used packing materials, e.g., card board, styrofoam, and what-not.

Here are the essentials for DIY terrain with stuff scrap material:

Simple right?

A knife to cut, a metal ruler to make straight edges, a surface that you can use for cutting, and glue.

I’ve written a lot about glues for tabletop miniature and model kit assembly. For scratch-building with paper based material, however, I recommend either PVA white glue, or a hot glue gun.

The hot glue gun that I have is one of the larger sized ones. It heats up quickly, has a low-drip nozzle (super useful), and a stand so it doesn’t tip over.

Don’t forget your hot glue sticks.

Sours: https://tangibleday.com/3-awesome-ways-to-make-wargaming-terrain-cheap-easy-and-free/
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Dustin Faulkner






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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 9:31 pm    Post subject: hammer         Reply with quote

Very nice! I really like weapons that have that simple and functional look. Nothing fancy...just straight to the point (literally) :P
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Craig L.







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PostPosted: Mon 11 Jan, 2010 10:42 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice job, Dustin -- looks quite handy!

Cheers,
Craig
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Christopher VaughnStrever






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PostPosted: Tue 12 Jan, 2010 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have had similar interests, though this is a very nice item to see;of what one can do at his home (sort to speak)
Experience and learning from such defines maturity, not a number of age
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Pauli Vennervirta







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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 5:39 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.
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Arne Focke


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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 7:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice work.

The words you were looking for in German are "Kriegshammer" or "Streithammer".
In this case i would use "Rabenschnabel", because of its beak.
So schön und inhaltsreich der Beruf eines Archäologen ist, so hart ist auch seine Arbeit, die keinen Achtstundentag kennt! (Wolfgang Kimmig in: Die Heuneburg an der oberen Donau, Stuttgart 1983)
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PostPosted: Wed 13 Jan, 2010 2:19 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Pauli Vennervirta wrote:
What about using a rock pick or a geologists hammer as the starting point? I have been thinking about getting one.


that's almost exactly what I used for doing a prototype for a pole-hammer; stock removal to cut down the head and deepen the lightning cuts, and then waist in and facet the back-spike (well, back-spoon, really - rounded to avoid a point for reenactment). Having had the whole thing cut to shape, polished, etc, the plan is/was to try it out for a little while, and then to cast it up in an RTV rubber mould, make lost-wax castings from the moulds, and have them investment cast in carbon steel, and then hand-worked and finished off and stuck to hafts.

A plan as cunning as a fox with a degree in cunning, from oxford, only mildly undermined by the fact my local lumber-yard's been out of ash hafts for the last two months, and its therefore sitting gathering dust, while I wait for them to get some in.
Not that I could use it just now, given the weather... and a shoulder that's wonky in the cold.


regarding Mr Dustin Faulkner's original peice, I think what jumps out at me, is that the handle is far too modern in appearance. take the head, pop it onto a straight, octagonal section haft with wooden langet straps running down the two sides, and I think it'd go from "ok" to pretty damn good.
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Todd Webber







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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 2:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am going attempt to make a similar project over the next few weeks. I am wondering if there are any methods to “antique” the hammer head?

I am going to sand and use linseed oil of the shaft.
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Julian Reynolds






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Ron Reuter






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JG Elmslie


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PostPosted: Fri 17 Dec, 2010 9:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Julian Reynolds wrote:
JG Elmslie, can I make a suggestion?

For ash axe hafts, I just buy a load of cricket stumps. Straight grained English ash, 28" long, 1 1/4" min. diameter. I can pick up half a dozen for just over £20 (less if I scour the junk shops). I use them to make hafts for the tomahawk and boarding axe simulators I make for the WMA guys.

Julian


that is,as they say, dead cunning. I'll remember that for small sections of ash - thankyou.
I rather like the simulators you're doing there. Are those cast in RTV silicone, or the likes?


Regarding buying such hafts of course, there's just one little technical flaw...
I'm scottish. where can you find this "cricket" thing you talk about? Happy
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Julian Reynolds






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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 1:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Silicone is for wimps - they're made from hardwood (iroko, beech, whatever I have lots of at the time) sprayed black.

They're tough, effective, look authentic/traditional at 20 paces and hurt a lot less than a re-enactment metal blunt. I use them for 18th Century WMA/reenactment because you aren't wearing any sort of armour or protection (no plate or shields, for instance) at this time in history and therefore a metal blunt would just cause massive damage if it accidentally connected with sufficient force.....

Anyway, I risk hijacking this thread so I'll sign off....

Julian
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Dec, 2010 11:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Historically would the langets have gone under the head? I heard somewhere they went over the head to hold it on, but i dunno if the guy was right. I'm intrigued.
Thnx
Z
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Ron Reuter






Location: Southern Indiana
Joined: 04 Oct 2007

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PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2010 4:55 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Zach Gordon wrote:
Historically would the langets have gone under the head? I heard somewhere they went over the head to hold it on, but i dunno if the guy was right. I'm intrigued.
Thnx
Z


I didn't mean to imply that my method was historic, it is probably not. I wanted to add langets to it, and this was an easy way for me to finish them at the hammer head end. Even this method, though, would protect the wood handle from some strikes.

Ron
www.yeoldegaffers.com
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Scott Jefcoats






Location: Covington County, Mississippi
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PostPosted: Sun 19 Dec, 2010 8:53 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I don't have a picture but I have created a graphic that I hope will show the method I used. The langets don't fit under the head. I bent them a bit so that they curved at the end, and then carved the wood a bit so that it appears that they disappear under the head. They are just actually butted up against the head.

Thanks Ron Happy .
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