Hi5 characters

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Hi-5 (Australian group)

For the television series of the same name starring the group, see Hi-5 (Australian TV series) and Hi-5 House.

Australian children's musical group

Hi-5 were an Australian children's musical group formed in 1998 in association with the children's television series of the same name. Helena Harris and Posie Graeme-Evans created the television series for the Nine Network, which premiered in 1999. The group were made up of five performers who entertained and educated preschool children through music, movement and play. Kellie Crawford, Kathleen de Leon Jones, Nathan Foley, Tim Harding and Charli Robinson were the founding members. By the end of 2008, all of the original line-up had left, and the group's membership changed several more times after that. They collectively starred in several television series, released albums, and performed on worldwide tours. The television series features puppet characters Chatterbox and Jup Jup, who were included in the group's live stage shows.

Hi-5 were one of Australia's highest paid entertainment groups, placing in the Business Review Weekly's annual list several times, earning an estimated A$18 million in 2007. As employees of the brand, once owned by the Nine Network, the members of Hi-5 did not hold equity. The Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) certified their albums as double platinum (It's a Party), platinum (Jump and Jive with Hi-5, Boom Boom Beat, It's a Hi-5 Christmas) and gold (Celebrate). Four of them reached the top 10 on the ARIA Albums Chart; It's a Party (number four, July 2000), Boom Boom Beat (number three, August 2001), It'sa Hi-5 Christmas (number four, December 2001) and Hi-5 Hits (number ten, July 2003). By 2004, the original line-up had received three Logie Television Awards for Most Outstanding Children's Program and five consecutive ARIA Music Awards for Best Children's Album.

The group's later iterations did not enjoy the same popularity or critical success as its original line-up. Hi-5 were last nominated for a major Australian award in 2012 and last released an album in 2014. The Nine Network sold the brand in 2012 to Malaysian-based group Asiasons, who shifted its commercial focus to the Southeast Asian market. After a short-lived television revival in 2017, the group's production company wholly relocated to Singapore and began employing a roster of temporary performers for touring purposes until 2019.

History[edit]

1998–1999: Formation[edit]

Hi-5 were formed in September 1998 in Sydney, Australia, as a children's musical group.[1][2] Television producer Helena Harris, who had worked on Bananas in Pyjamas, co-created Hi-5 as a concept for a new television show of the same name for the Nine Network.[2][3] She and co-producer Posie Graeme-Evans developed the series as preschool entertainment, blending educational theories with a musical appeal to capture children's attention.[5] Harris said that while Hi-5 was predominantly a television series, its music was able to be differentiated from the show.[6] Featuring five performers, the cast were intended to act as the audience's older siblings or friends, rather than adults teaching children.[8] Harris was inspired to develop a show with broad appeal and accessible themes such as family and animals.[6] She modelled the group's style on the fast-paced nature of contemporary music videos and strove to allude to items of current interest (such as relevant curriculum as well as popular jokes, films and music) to keep children engaged.[10] Harris recalled watching the Spice Girls, whose dance moves she believed preschoolers could copy.[3][11] The creators saw the need for "life-affirming" television for rapidly maturing preschoolers and found most children learn from programs which use music and movement.

After auditions for the group in June 1998 (narrowing down around 300 people to only five),[5][12] the television pilot for Hi-5 was produced in mid-1998.[13] The original cast consisted of Kellie Crawford (née Hoggart), Kathleen de Leon Jones, Nathan Foley, Tim Harding and Charli Robinson.[2] After being commissioned, production began in October 1998.[13] The first series premiered in April 1999 on the Nine Network.[14][15] In September, Sony Music released their debut album, Jump and Jive with Hi-5, which reached number 33 on the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA)Albums Chart.[16][17]

2000–2006: Early success[edit]

Hi-5 won the 2000 Logie Award for Most Outstanding Children's Program in recognition of their television program, and the ARIA Award for Best Children's Album for Jump and Jive with Hi-5.[18][19] Their releases consistently received album accreditations; Celebrate was certified as gold, while Jump and Jive with Hi-5, Boom Boom Beat and It's a Hi-5 Christmas went platinum, and It's a Party received double platinum status.[20][21][22] Four of their albums reached the top 10 on the ARIA Albums Chart; It's a Party (number four, July 2000), Boom Boom Beat (number three, August 2001), It's a Hi-5 Christmas (number four, December 2001) and Hi-5 Hits (number ten, July 2003).[17] It was reported in 2005 that a feature film starring the group was in early development, as well as arrangements for a single release.[23]

Hi-5 toured nationally for up to eight months of every year, with sell-out concerts in venues such as the Sydney Opera House.[25][26] The quintet's production of Hi-5 Alive won the 2002 Helpmann Award for Best Presentation for Children, while their Space Magic production was nominated in the same category in 2006.[27][28] The group first toured the UK in 2004,[6] and in 2005 performed in arenas around Australia to maximise the audience capacity.[12] In addition to their regular tours, Hi-5 appeared annually at Vision Australia's Carols by Candlelight in Melbourne, broadcast live by the Nine Network on Christmas Eve.[29]

2006–2008: Replacement of original members[edit]

In early 2006, de Leon Jones announced she was pregnant, and would take maternity leave from April onwards.[30][31]Sun Park was introduced as her temporary replacement; de Leon Jones gave birth to her first child in July.[30][31] Park was part of the television series filming in 2006 and toured with the group across Australia.[32][33] In July 2006, de Leon Jones said she was intent on returning to Hi-5;[34] however, in July 2007, made the decision to leave the group permanently to focus on being a mother.[35] Park took her place as a full-time member.[35]

A serious motorcycle accident in June 2007 left Harding unable to keep up with the pace of Hi-5's performances.[36][37] Just a few days before this, Stevie Nicholson had been hired as an understudy and was put straight to work as a temporary replacement for Harding.[37][38] The group toured the Hi-5 Circus Stageshow in 2007; the show adopted a circus theme and incorporated tricks such as trapeze, tightrope walking and gymnastics.[39] They had only one week of training; some members benefitted from prior experience.[39] Nicholson debuted on tour with the Circus show in Singapore.[39] Harding permanently departed in November after recovering from his injuries and was replaced by Nicholson.[37][40][41]

Robinson (then referred to as Delaney) exited from the group in February 2008.[42] She expressed an interest in proving herself as an actor for an adult audience and said she would help find a replacement member.[43][44] After leaving, she established a career in the Australian media industry as a presenter.[45] In April, Casey Burgess was revealed as Robinson's replacement and began touring with the group.[46][47]

In March 2008, the Nine Network, along with production company Southern Star, purchased the Hi-5 brand.[48] The change of ownership saw Harris and Graeme-Evans end their involvement with the franchise, which was placed under the direction of Martin Hersov and Cathy Payne, Nine and Southern Star executives.[48][49]

By November 2008, the remaining original cast members had stated their intent to withdraw from the group. Crawford reported in October that she would be leaving at the end of the year to explore other options, and a month later, Foley outlined his plan to exit and focus on his adult music career.[49][50][51] In December, Park also stated she would be departing the group since she had expected only to be a temporary replacement.[52]The Daily Telegraph's Sydney Confidential reporter alleged that Hi-5's production company had asked Crawford and Foley to leave, and that the producers were "opting to recruit younger, cheaper performers".[45] Neither of them responded to these reports, but Park denied the industry rumours, saying that there had been no pressure for any of them to resign.[45][52] The departing members gave their final performance at Carols by Candlelight on Christmas Eve in Melbourne.[52]

2009–2013: Second generation[edit]

Full body shot of two smiling women. Woman at left is taller and has her right hand at her hip. The other woman has her arm around the back of the first. They stand in front of hoarding signs.
Lauren Brantand Dayen Zheng, The Ivy Ballroom, Sydney, November 2012

In February 2009, Lauren Brant, Fely Irvine and Tim Maddren joined Nicholson and Burgess to complete the group's new line-up.[53][54] Burgess described the change as a difficult transition period that led to uncertainty over their future.[55] They toured regional Australian locations in early 2010 to build a new audience.[56] The group celebrated the 500th episode of the television series in 2010,[57] and in 2011, they rerecorded several of the original line-up's songs.[58] They did not receive the same positive critical reception as the original members; one reviewer found fault with the new line-up's vocal abilities.[59] The group joined World Vision Australia as ambassadors in 2009, beginning their work in the Philippines while on a promotional tour, and completing a volunteer trip to Cambodia in 2012.[60][61] They also became representatives of the Starlight Children's Foundation in 2009; their work included regular visits to hospitals while on tour.[62][63]

Irvine's final performance as part of Hi-5 was at Carols by Candlelight on Christmas Eve 2011.[64] Nine Network representatives said she would leave to explore "other career options".[64] Her replacement, Dayen Zheng, joined the group in January 2012.[64][65] Burgess and Maddren departed in early 2013; Maddren had secured a role in the Australian musical production of The Addams Family, while Burgess had decided to further her solo music career.[66][67]

In June 2012, the Nine Network announced that because of their ongoing financial difficulties, they had sold the Hi-5 brand in its entirety to Malaysian-based equity group, Asiasons.[68][69][70] Datuk Jared Lim, Asiasons's managing director, described plans to expand Hi-5 throughout Southeast Asia, while keeping the group's presence in Australia intact.[68] Julie Greene, former producer of the television series, assumed the role of executive creative director.[69]

2013–2016: Third generation, shift to Southeast Asia[edit]

New members Mary Lascaris and Ainsley Melham joined Nicholson, Brant, and Zheng in early 2013.[71] The audition process was filmed and turned into a documentary-style film, Some Kind of Wonderful, which premiered exclusively through Hoyts Cinemas in Australia in March.[71][67] The press branded this line-up as a "new generation" of the group.[71]

Throughout this period, the production company shifted the commercial focus of the group to the Southeast Asian market, with an increase in Asian touring locations. In 2014, the group debuted in the Middle East with a Dubai show and toured Bangkok for the first time in ten years.[72] They returned to the Philippines in 2015 for an encore season after a sold-out run of concerts the previous year.[72] A new television series entitled Hi-5 House was filmed in Singapore and Malaysia between 2013 and 2015, and aired on pay-TV channel Nick Jr. in Australia and Disney Junior in Asia;[73] its success in Asia resulted in an Asian Television Award for Best Preschool Program in 2015.[74] The program premiered worldwide on online television streaming service Netflix in March 2016.[75][76]

Brant's final performances were in July 2014 for the Australian House Hits tour, in which the cast wore costumes she designed under her new fashion label, Loliboli.[77] Her successor, Tanika Anderson, was already working with the group as an understudy and puppeteer.[78][79] Nicholson departed in December 2015 to further his performing career and promote his children's book, Superdudes.[8][80] He was replaced by Lachie Dearing, who was introduced on tour in January 2016.[76][81] After being cast in an Australian musical production of Xanadu in January 2016, Melham left the group, and new member Gabe Brown took his place in February.[82][83] Brown was later succeeded by Chris White.[84]

2016–2019: Fourth generation, short-lived television revival[edit]

The Nine Network renewed its partnership with the Hi-5 franchise in October 2016 and expressed plans to revive the original television series with a new cast in 2017.[85][86] As a result, Zheng, Lascaris, Anderson and White gave their last performances in December 2016.[87] After auditions were held in November 2016, new members Courtney Clarke, Shay Clifford, Joe Kalou and Bailey Spalding were revealed in December, joining Dearing to form the fourth generation of the group.[88][89] The quintet debuted at Carols by Candlelight on Christmas Eve, Hi-5's first appearance at the Nine event since 2012.[90][91] The new television series was filmed in Malaysia and premiered in May 2017 on Nine's multichannel, 9Go! in Australia.[92][93] Additional filming in 2018 was halted before the Australian production office was closed and the brand was relocated to Singapore.[93] All five members departed the group, and the brand used temporary touring members for the remainder of 2018.[94] The franchise continued employing non-permanent performers for touring purposes in 2019.[95]

Musical style[edit]

Hi-5 were described as "a pop group for kids" by Foley in 2004.[96] Chris Harriott was the group's primary composer, writing thousands of their tracks.[97][98] Graeme-Evans and Harriott had worked together when he scored the themes for the teen dramas series, The Miraculous Mellops (1991) and Mirror, Mirror (1995),[99][100] and he had worked on his own in Australian theatre.[98] The creators approached him and tasked him with writing top ten songs for an age range of two to six.[98] Harriott worked regularly with a group of lyricists, including Chris Phillips, Leone Carey and Lisa Hoppe.[101][102] Foley cited the Wiggles as an influence of Hi-5, but noted the respective groups had different musical styles, with Harriott's compositions resembling top 40 rather than nursery rhymes.[103] Original member of the Wiggles and classical musician Phillip Wilcher commended the gentle educational appeal of Hi-5's music, and declared that they seemed to "know the subtle difference between childlike and childish."[104]

Educational value[edit]

"We are a pop group but with educational values and we push this as much as possible. We take on a big brother or sister role as opposed to a parental role and just try to have fun."

—Nathan Foley, 2004[96]

Hi-5, and the related television series, blended educational aspects with music and movement, while regularly updating the music and costumes to remain "abreast of the times".[5][12] The members were presented as older siblings or friends to their young audience, rather than appearing as adults teaching them.[8][26] The series' creators loosely based it on an underlying educational structure influenced by Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences.[106] The producers recognised that most children have a preferred style of learning, and structured the group's work to have each member modelling skills in a specific area such as kinesthetic learning and musicality.[5] Harris observed most children would identify with the presenter who demonstrated their favoured learning style.[8] According to the group's website, Hi-5 incorporated Piaget's theory of cognitive development.[106] The educational theory caters to a wide range of ages in the audience while being aimed primarily at children aged two to eight.[6][46] Harris intended for the central themes promoted to be universally accessible, as she believed children are essentially the same around the world.[6] The pace and design of the group's performances were influenced by that of contemporary music videos. They encouraged participation at their live stage shows through interactive elements with which the children engage.[25] Group members expressed that performances were adapted to include more songs and physical elements in countries where English is not the main spoken language.[107]

Brand and finances[edit]

Hi-5 brand creators, Harris and Graeme-Evans, originally owned it under their joint production company Kids Like Us.[48] In contrast to their peer entertainers, the Wiggles, the cast of Hi-5 did not hold equity, but were employees of the brand.[52][108] Crawford noted, "the money system has to go a long way around before it gets to us".[108] In March 2008, the Nine Network and production company Southern Star purchased the Hi-5 brand.[48] The franchise was placed under the direction of Martin Hersov and Cathy Payne, Nine and Southern Star executives, while Harris and Graeme-Evans ended their involvement with the company with the sale.[48][49][note 1]

The brand dropped from a net worth of A$18 million in 2009 to A$9.7 million in 2010.[110][111] In June 2012, the Nine Network sold the Hi-5 brand to Asian equity group, Asiasons, through a private fund.[68][69][112] The company planned to expand the brand throughout Southeast Asia, while maintaining its presence in Australia.[68] Former series' producer Julie Greene became the brand's executive creative director.[68][69] The Hi-5 brand was consolidated under Tremendous Entertainment in 2014, after the equity fund was sold.[112][113] The Nine Network renewed its partnership with the Hi-5 franchise in October 2016 and participated in the production of a new television series in 2017.[85][92] In September 2018, the Australian production office was closed; the entire franchise relocated to Singapore.[93]

The franchise launched a series of international versions; each group toured and produced local adaptations of the television series. In 2002, an American version of Hi-5 was created; the group filmed for television, recorded albums and toured.[114][115] By 2005, franchises local to India, South America and Germany were planned, but these did not eventuate.[23] A television series and a tour introduced the UK group in 2008.[116][117] After the brand's sale in 2012, there was a return to licensing international groups. In 2014, a Latin American group was created,[118] followed by a local version for the Philippines in 2015,[119] and the introduction of an Indonesian group in 2017.[120]

Reception[edit]

Commercial performance[edit]

Business Review Weekly's annual Australian income list recognised the group as one of the country's highest paid entertainment groups, estimating annual earnings of A$18 million in 2007.[121] The franchise was reported as Australia's highest selling children's music property in 2007.[122] The original quintet consistently received album ARIA accreditations for their releases: Celebrate was accredited as gold,[22] while Jump and Jive with Hi-5, Boom Boom Beat and It's a Hi-5 Christmas went platinum.[20][21]It's a Party received double platinum status.[21] Four of the original line-up's albums reached the top 10 on the ARIA Albums Chart – It's a Party peaked at number four in July 2000; Boom Boom Beat reached number three in August 2001; It's a Hi-5 Christmas at number four in December 2001; and their greatest hits album, Hi-5 Hits, reached number ten in July 2003.[17]

Critical reviews[edit]

Critics in the Australian press often described Hi-5 as quality children's entertainment. The original line-up were praised both as a cohesive ensemble, and for their talents at singing and dancing.[123][124] Reviewers highlighted the group members' energy and enthusiasm.[123][125][126] Hi-5's music has been described as simple, "infectious", and inspired by pop music.[124][126][127] The brand's employment of diverse performers, to serve as positive role models for children, was well-received.[124][128] The group's concert tours were admired for the fast pace of the shows and the bright colours of the staging design.[126][129] Reviewing the Circus Stageshow in 2008, Nicole Bittar of The Age described the members as versatile and cheerful, and commended their circus skills.[129] A 2015 concert was viewed by The Daily Telegraph as "well-choreographed and performed".[130] The group's productions have also been noted for their humour, incorporating slapstick elements inspired by pantomime comedy.[124][126][130] Reporters said they had a teenage and adult following, with dedicated older fans;[103][131] adult followers in the Philippines would use the group's songs to learn English.[132]

Later iterations of the group were criticised for their performances, and the brand was criticised for frequent membership changes. In her blog for The Daily Telegraph in 2011, Sarrah Le Marquand found fault with Brant's musical abilities, claiming that while she was an enthusiastic entertainer, she had limited vocal talent.[59] The reporter went on to suggest the entire line-up at the time were "melodically challenged".[59] A business blog argued that the group's target audience was unclear; while the franchise was aimed at preschoolers, the music and choreography seemed too complicated and like it was designed for an audience of older children.[133] The writer stated that the group had undefined member roles and that the performers attempted to upstage each other.[133] Similarly, in a 2011 survey by the Australian Council on Children and the Media, parents condemned the costuming of the group, stating it was inappropriate for the audience and "premature sexualisation".[134] Commentators have expressed disapproval of the franchise frequently replacing its performers with new talent; the newer line-ups were described as unrecognisable.[135][136] Critiquing the debut of a new line-up at Carols by Candlelight in 2016, David Knox wrote that the performance was unmemorable, and suggested that their strengths were not demonstrated at the event.[137]

Members[edit]

Timeline

Discography[edit]

Main article: Hi-5 discography

  • Jump and Jive with Hi-5 (1999)
  • It's a Party (2000)
  • Boom Boom Beat (2001)
  • It's a Hi-5 Christmas (2001)
  • Celebrate (2002)
  • Hi-5 Holiday (2003)
  • Jingle Jangle Jingle with Hi-5 (2004)
  • Making Music (2005)
  • Wish Upon a Star (2006)
  • Wow! (2007)
  • Planet Earth (2008)
  • Spin Me Round (2009)
  • Turn the Music Up! (2010)
  • Sing it Loud (2011)
  • Hi-5 Hot Hits! (2014)

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^Graeme-Evans only served as a co-producer for the first two series of the television show.[109]
  2. ^Nicholson returned as a guest performer in December 2018 and November 2019.
  3. ^Anderson joined as an understudy in October 2013 before becoming a regular member in July 2014.[79] She returned as a guest performer in December 2018 and November 2019.
  4. ^Hi-5 was tied with Round the Twist.[155]

Citations

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  58. ^"Hi-5 – Our Stories". Starlight Foundation. Archived from the original on 30 March 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  59. ^Symonds, Kristy (13 July 2015). "Hi-5 brings song, dance and smiles to PMH patients during Perth tour". Perth Now. Seven West Media. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  60. ^ abcKnox, David (20 December 2011). "Cast change at Hi-5". TV Tonight. Archived from the original on 23 February 2016. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  61. ^Kwok Kar Peng (25 June 2012). "Cool to be a fool". The New Paper. Asiaone.com.sg. Archived from the original on 22 February 2019. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  62. ^Smith, Rohan (25 February 2013). "New generation bound to fall for the creepy, kooky Addams family ... click, click". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 13 January 2021. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  63. ^ abTapaleao, Vaimoana (7 March 2013). "Popular Aussie children's show Hi-5 set for the big screen". The Queensland Times. News Corp Australia. Archived from the original on 1 May 2019. Retrieved 1 May 2019.
  64. ^ abcdeSchmidl, Engel (21 June 2012). "Hi-5 sold off to $250 million Asian private equity group". Smart Company. Archived from the original on 8 December 2020. Retrieved 22 February 2016.
  65. ^ abcdMirrah Amit, Nur (18 June 2013). "Interview with Julie Greene, Executive Producer of Hi-5". On Screen Asia. Contineo Media. Archived from the original on 11 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  66. ^Kruger, Colin; Hawthorne, Mark (26 September 2012). "Channel Nine on brink as banks circle". The Sydney Morning Herald. Nine Entertainment Co. Archived from the original on 6 December 2020. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  67. ^ abcMcCabe, Kathy (16 March 2013). "Hi-5 new members Ainsley Melham, Mary Lascaris, Dayen Zheng unveiled". News.com.au. News Corp Australia. Archived from the original on 6 December 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2016. Note: McCabe describes this line-up as the "fourth generation".
  68. ^ ab"Hi-5 adds more milestones with its roaring success in Asia and premiere in the Middle East". Tremendous Asia Partners (Press release). 3 October 2014. Archived from the original on 7 January 2016. Retrieved 24 February 2016.
  69. ^
    • For filming in Singapore in 2013, see McCabe, Kathy (18 August 2013). "Hi-5 will head home to Australia for House Party tour after filming new series in Singapore". News.com.au. News Corp Australia. Archived from the original on 6 December 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
    • For filming in Malaysia in 2015, see "Children's band Hi-5 launches promotional tour on the Gold Coast". Gold Coast Bulletin. News Corp Australia. 18 May 2015. Archived from the original on 8 December 2020. Retrieved 7 November 2016.
    • For Nick Jr. airing, see Knox, David (4 December 2013). "Foxtel: Summer highlights for kids". TV Tonight. Archived from the original on 27 December 2020. Retrieved 30 December 2020.
    • For Disney Junior airing, see Low, Phoebe (8 December 2014). "8 Questions With Tanika Anderson: Hi-5's newest member was a busker". The Straits Times. Singapore Press Holdings. Archived from the original on 6 July 2015. Retrieved 5 November 2016.
  70. ^ ab"2015 Winners". Asian Television Awards. Archived from the original on 11 March 2016. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  71. ^"Hi-5 House on Netflix USA". New on Netflix USA. Archived from the original on 10 October 2016. Retrieved 9 October 2016.
  72. ^ abHeary, Monica (21 January 2016). "Dream to reality for shire Hi-5 recruit Dearing". St George & Sutherland Shire Leader. Archived from the original on 16 August 2016. Retrieved 26 May 2016.
  73. ^Pierce, Jeremy (28 June 2014). "Lauren Brant quits Hi-5 for other projects in entertainment industry and growing fashion business". The Courier-Mail. News Corp Australia. Archived from the original on 6 December 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2016.
  74. ^Ranke, Angela (24 June 2014). "Tanika Anderson joins Hi-5, replacing Lauren Brant". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on 6 December 2020. Retrieved 24 February 2016.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi-5_(Australian_group)

Hi-5 may or may not be reuniting. Here's where the original cast are now, 22 years later.

She was also on the eighth season of Dancing with the Stars (2008), co-hosted It Takes Two in 2009 and appeared in the short film Tegan the Vegan. She’s currently giving us all the wanderlust via Channel 9’s Getaway, which you can follow over on her tropical paradise-filled Instagram account.

Charli split from husband Brent Delaney in 2009 after 16 years together and is now engaged to Liam Talbot, Australian racing driver and son of mining magnate Ken Talbot. The couple, who have been together since February 2016, have a one-year-old daughter named Kensington.

Kellie Crawford (Hoggart).

Since departing Hi-5 in 2008, Kellie has worked as an actor, voice artist and TV presenter. Most recently, she was a panel judge on the 2018 reality talent show All Together Now – The 100.

In May of 2008, she married production manager, Adam Crawford, after a 10-week engagement. This was after her and fellow Hi-5 member, Nathan Foley, called off their engagement. She is currently dating Aussie singer songwriter Rhys Tolhurst. The couple announced in late 2019 they have plans to release a podcast.

Sours: https://www.mamamia.com.au/original-members-of-hi-5/
  1. Free stuff in waterloo iowa
  2. Tall tiki statue
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Series / Hi-5

https://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/hi5turnthemusicup_7516.jpg

The 2009 incarnation of the cast. note From left to right; Stevie, Lauren, Casey, Fely, Tim.

"Five in the air, let's do it together..."

Hi-5 is an Australian children's television series transmitted on the Nine Network, currently airing on Channel Nine's sister digital channel 9Go!. It was created by Helena Harris (who also created Bananas in Pyjamas) after she found that her children had outgrown Bananas but still needed viable entertainment that satiated their capacity for learning. After teaming up with co-producer Posie Graeme-Evans, pre-production began in 1998 and the show debuted a year later.

The concept of the show revolved around five presenters — three females and two males with backgrounds in singing, dancing and acting. Within a thirty-minute episode, each of the presenters would have their own segments which displayed their "expertise" (for example, Kathleen from the original series dealt with the logic-based segments in the show whereas Charli would demonstrate movement and motor skills) but would ultimately band together to perform a few songs and stories. Each episode would also have some kind of theme (such as animals, friendship or music) but the songs performed did not necessarily have to demonstrate the episode's subject.

The show is very popular with the under-ten set, and in its thirteen-year existence won five ARIA awards for "Best Children's Album" and three consecutive Logie Awards for "Most Outstanding Children's Preschool Program".

The first ten seasons (1999-2008) are available for free with a Hi-5 watermark on the official Hi-5 World YouTube channel, as that was its original purpose. Episodes after that are harder to come across. Season 3 of Hi-5 House was produced for Netflix, but has been removed. The 2017 revival is available in full on Stan, the Nine Network’s “premium” streaming service.

Not to be confused with a Friending Network of the same name or the character from The Emoji Movie.


Tropes:

  • Adaptational Nice Guy: Downplayed. In the American version of the show, there are some instances of Jup-Jup wanting to give to Kimee what he kept for himself in the original version of the show, and it's even hinted that he has a crush on her.
  • Animated Credits Opening: The opening theme features animated versions of the cast.
    • Although the intros for each segment have always been animated, they never featured the cast in their animated forms until Hi-5 UK, and it carried over to the eleventh Australian season.
  • Blonde, Brunette, Redhead: Kellie, Kathleen and Charli in the original cast, though Charli's hair became lighter as the series went on.
  • Blue is Calm: In one song, the singer links colours to emotions. She links blue with serenity.
  • Cloud Cuckoolander: Chatterbox has a vivid imagination, and sometimes she gets excited when trying to keep up with it.
  • Colour-Coded Characters: The UK version. Jenny wore pink, Emma wore yellow, Chris wore blue, Cat wore green, and Luke wore red.
  • Cultural Translation: The American version of the song "North, South, East, and West" mentions cowboy boots instead of jackaroos.
    • Different versions of the show largely follow the same script, but some changes were made to dialogue and props (a birthday card modeled after an American football instead of an Australian one, for example) for the American version of the show to account for linguistic and cultural differences.
    • The UK team filmed on its own local set, so the lyrics to "So Many Animals" were changed in order to better represent British fauna.
  • Compilation Movie: Nearly all of their home media releases use this. They consist of two hosted segments (if a host makes shorter ones, 3-4 segments) and different Songs of The Week positioned at the start, middle and end.
  • Does Not Like Shoes: Many, many sketches revolve around the cast going barefoot and engaging in activities that involve feet. Charli even sung a song about it once!

    We love it with no shoes on
    We love it when we're bare
    We can wiggle our toes, and tickle our soles, it's skin we like to wear

  • Early Installment Weirdness: The first few series were quite different to later seasons.
    • The stage was originally in a darker, less colorful room and had a runway.
    • It was a couple of years before the cast really started using costumes.
    • Chats and Jup Jup's puppets looked very different to the later versions. In addition, Chats spoke with Charli's normal voice. The song performance stage was also very different at first.
    • The sets looked a little different throughout the years, most notably Kathleen's wall.
    • Also the segment intros, particularly Nathan's, Kellie's and Kathleen's.
  • Edutainment Show
  • Excited Kids' Show Host: All of the presenters fit this trope.
  • Happy Birthday to You!: The show has its own original birthday song, which is performed in a few episodes:

    Happy happy happy happy birthday,
    With love from me to you, may your wishes all come true,
    Happy happy happy happy birthday,
    Shout hip hip hooray for your very special day...

    • In a Season 5 episode, Chats suggests singing the song. Kellie decides to write her own instead.
    • There's a birthday songlet that's used in a couple of the sharing stories segments.

    Today's your birthday! It's your day to play!/So three cheers for (birthday person)! Hip, hip, hooray!

    • Zig-zagged in the "Surprise!" tour, where Chats sings the song to herself. Meanwhile Tim and Lauren write their own birthday song, the song mentioned above.
  • Hunger Causes Lethargy: One sketch is about a superhero named "Super-Duper" who's oddly lethargic. They eventually find out that it's because he doesn't eat breakfast.
  • Literal Bookworm: There are two puppet bookworms named Aristotle (yellow with a bowtie) and Horace (blue with glasses). They're part of the cast of The Chatterbox segment, which aims to teach the audience the English language.
  • Long-Runner Cast Turnover: Especially in recent years. While the first incarnation of the cast had members staying for close to a decade, in Nathan and Kellie's case, ten years, cast members seemed to change every three years following that.
  • Meaningful Name: The show is named for its five exuberant presenters, and the act of giving a "high five".
  • Missed Meal Aesop: This show has a skit about how you should eat your breakfast every day, with a superhero named Super-Duper who is lethargic and can't do his job because he never eats breakfast.
  • My Nayme Is: The American group had members with names like "Shaun", "Kimee", "Karla", and "Sydney"; the Australian group had "Charli" and "Kellie".
  • Mythology Gag: One segment features Nathan getting his space ready for bedtime and expressing his delight in a dreamcatcher he's setting up. He says it was a gift from "[his] friend Shaun." Shaun Taylor-Corbett was Nathan's American counterpart and a descendant of the Blackfeet tribe who had just left the American Hi-5 group by that point.
    • One Series 8 segment sees Kathleen preparing to send a letter and package to her American counterpart, Kimee.
  • No Fourth Wall; the prevailing philosophy is that the audience is joining each member of the group in their space for company, so the cast treats the audience like they're physically with them, and when other cast members are around, they alternate between looking at them and looking at the camera.
  • Non-Human Sidekick: Kathleen/Kimee/Sun/Fely/Dayen/Shay's Hand Puppet friends Chatterbox (or 'Chats' for short) and Jup Jup. Chats is a Totally Radical jack-in-the-box (who's been known to talk a lot), while Jup Jup is an Ugly Cute alien... thing.
  • One, Two, Three, Four, Go!: One of the Songs of the Week is a high-energy number about the five senses. This trope was taken further for the American version of the show, where it was the first song of the week and therefore helped introduce audiences to the American Hi-5 group.
  • Real Life Writes the Plot: Though a few members of the cast "left the show to explore other options" (read: moved on for fear of being typecast), Kathleen de Leon Jones left because of her pregnancy and Tim Harding was forced to leave due to sustaining major injuries in a motorcycle accident.
  • Song of Many Emotions: One song compares the colours of the rainbow to emotions.
  • Spear Counterpart: "Friends Forever" is this to "Three Wishes", in the sense that the guys have all the solos in the former just as the the girls have all the solos in the latter.
  • Studio Audience: When the group performed their Songs of the Week, they performed them in front of a crowd of preschoolers in a concert-like setting.
  • Suspiciously Similar Substitute: All of the replacements for the original cast members seem to share their basic appearance traits. Justified since they are essentially filling the "roles" left by the previous cast members.
  • The Kiddie Ride: A carousel made by Ride On! Entertainment, which featured various instruments to ride. The decals and audio on the ride changed several times throughout the years, coinciding with the comings and goings of various band members. The original features the five original members in both their live-action and animated forms, as well as the two puppets.
  • West Coast Team: The franchise spawned overseas counterparts in the US, the UK, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The US version of the show was very popular, leading Matt Lauer to compare their popularity with that of The Beatles' after one performance on the Today show. The US version of the show was shot in the same studios as the Australian version — in Sydney, Australia.

Sours: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Series/HiFive
Hi-5 History - From 1998 to 2017

Hi-5 (Australian TV series)

Australian TV series

For the musical group appearing in the show, see Hi-5 (Australian group). For the spin-off series, see Hi-5 House.

Hi-5 is an Australian children's television series, originally produced by Kids Like Us and later Southern Star for the Nine Network, created by Helena Harris and Posie Graeme-Evans. The program is known for its educational content, and for the cast of the program, who became a recognised musical group for children outside of the series, known collectively as Hi-5. It has generated discussion about what is considered appropriate television for children. The series premiered on 12 April 1999 on the Nine Network.

The series is designed for a pre-school audience, featuring five performers who educate and entertain through play, movement and music, which is an integral part of the series. The segments of the show are based on an educational model. The original cast was composed of Kellie Crawford, Kathleen de Leon Jones, Nathan Foley, Tim Harding and Charli Robinson. By the end of 2008, this line-up had been completely phased out and replaced with a new group of performers. Hi-5 received three Logie Television Awards for Most Outstanding Children's Program.

Harris and Graeme-Evans ended their involvement with the series in 2008 when the program was sold to Southern Star and the Nine Network. The final episode of Hi-5 aired on 16 December 2011 as a result of the Nine Network selling the property in 2012. A spin-off series, Hi-5 House, aired on Nick Jr. from 2013 to 2016, produced with no involvement from Nine. The network renewed its partnership with the brand in October 2016 and produced a revived series with a new cast, which aired on 9Go! in 2017.

Format[edit]

Hi-5 is a variety-style series for preschoolers which features music as an integral part of its premise. Aimed at children aged between two and eight, the series incorporates educational trends with a pop music appeal, using song and movement to capture the attention of children.[1] The series employs central themes of exploration and discovery, providing children with an opportunity for a "sensitive exploration of their world".[2]Hi-5 encourages children to "take a joyous and active part in life", with active participation encouraged.[3][2] The program features five presenters who are collectively known as Hi-5, and perform songs as a group as well as presenting individual segments. All segments are integrated with music as a tool to highlight the key concepts of each episode.[4]

The Shapes in Space segment focuses on visual and spatial awareness, with the presenter exploring shapes, colour and everyday materials such as boxes and playdough.[5]Musicality is explored through Making Music, with an emphasis on pitch, rhythm, beat, melody, and using a variety of real and pretend instruments.[6] The presenter of Body Move encourages children to participate in movement and dance, developing physical coordination and motor development.[5] Linguistics and aural skills are at the centre of the Word Play segment, featuring a puppet named Chatterbox who assists in the exploration of language through stories and rhymes.[6]Puzzles and Patterns has a focus on logical thinking and mathematics, with a puppet named Jup Jup used as a tool for the presenter to complete puzzles or solve problems.[6]

The final segment in which the cast comes together is entitled Sharing Stories, where a story is told that explores interpersonal relationships and emotions.[5] The episodes are bookended with a Song of the Week; a pop-style feature song which corresponds with the weekly theme and sets an educational topic for the week's episodes.[3]

The 2017 revived series featured new puppet characters, the Jupsters, who were introduced as the family of previously established character Jup Jup.[7] The revival also retained a segment introduced in Hi-5 House, entitled The Chatterbox. This segment focuses on the discovery of language through simple words and phrases, and features the puppet Chatterbox, who teaches a toy robot named Tinka how to speak.[8]

Production[edit]

Conception[edit]

Hi-5 was created in 1998 by television producer Helena Harris, who had worked on Bananas in Pyjamas. She and co-producer Posie Graeme-Evans (The Miraculous Mellops, Mirror, Mirror)[9][10] developed the series as preschool entertainment.[1] The name of the series was derived from the high five gesture.[11]

Harris stated that her inspiration for Hi-5 came partly from living in England, where she realised that children are the same around the world, and expected the show would appeal universally, with accessible themes such as family and animals.[1] Harris strove to incorporate items of current interest to engage with the children and keep them interested in the show.[12] The creators saw the need for "life-affirming" television for rapidly maturing preschoolers, and found that most children learned from shows which incorporated movement and song.[13] The creators believed pre-schoolers have matured beyond programs such as Here's Humphrey.[5][13]

The series was pitched to the Nine Network through Harris and Graeme-Evans' joint independent production company, Kids Like Us. It was picked up by the network within days of being pitched, and officially ordered after two weeks.[14] Harris stated that the network's enthusiasm for the show emanated from the executives' young children.[14][15] A pilot was filmed in mid-1998,[16] which was shown to a test audience. No changes were made to the format after the test.[17] After being commissioned, the first full series began production in October, and had concluded by December.[16][18] The Nine Network initially signed a co-venture with Kids Like Us to produce two 45-episode series of the show and the first went to air on Nine on 12 April 1999.[13][19][15][20]Hi-5 was granted a P classification, deeming it specifically designed to meet the needs and interests of pre-schoolers and allowing it to be broadcast on the Nine Network with a 30-minute runtime commercial-free.[21] The first series was produced for US$20,000 to US$30,000 for each episode.[18] A fashion line for children, based on the costuming featured on the program, was released alongside the premiere of the show.[20] Graeme-Evans only served as a co-producer for the first two series.[22]

Development[edit]

Hi-5 received a total of three Logie Television Awards, two for Most Outstanding Children's Program in 2000 and 2001 and one for Most Outstanding Children's Preschool Program in 2004.[23][24][25] In 2005, it was stated that one episode would cost an estimated A$50,000 to produce, and that a feature film was in early development.[26] The 300th episode of Hi-5 was celebrated in 2005.[26] Harris stated that by 2007, "Hi-5 [was] still evolving and maintaining its relevance and freshness".[27] Nine reportedly signed a two-year deal with the producers in 2007.[28] The Hi-5 brand was purchased by the Nine Network, along with production company Southern Star, in March 2008, from previous owners Harris and Graeme-Evans.[29] Robinson recalled that she had tried to depart from the programme after eight years but producers convinced her stay, and that the following years working on the show were her favourite.[30]

Nine committed to five new series of Hi-5 in 2009 with a new generation cast, to be aired until 2013.[31] However, only three of these planned series were produced. The eleventh series debuted on 31 August 2009.[32] Brand directors Martin Hersov and Cathy Payne said "we're very excited to be launching the next phase of Hi-5".[31] Of the cast change, executive producer Noel Price stated that Hi-5 was designed so that its popularity would not solely rely on the appeal of cast members as individuals.[33] The 500th episode of Hi-5 was celebrated in 2010 during the twelfth series.[34] By this series, Price stated the producers aimed to recreate the success of the earlier episodes by "captur[ing] that earlier innocence".[33] The thirteenth and final series of the original Hi-5 premiered on 17 October 2011, in which the program's musical history was recognised by reintroducing previous songs to a new generation of fans.[35]

Cancellation[edit]

In June 2012 the Nine Network announced that the Hi-5 brand has been sold in its entirety to Asian equity group, Asiasons, following Nine's reported financial difficulties.[8][36][37]Hi-5 would no longer be produced by Nine and therefore the thirteenth series became the last. A spin-off series entitled Hi-5 House was created under new management to continue the Hi-5 concept. The new series was produced independently from Nine and aired on Nick Jr. from 2013 to 2016.[8][38]

Revival[edit]

The Nine Network renewed its partnership with the Hi-5 franchise in October 2016 and announced its plans to revive Hi-5 with a new cast in 2017.[38] Executive producer Julie Greene stated "we're really excited to be working with Nine to develop a reinvigorated Hi-5 show".[2] The revival would feature a new cast and set, but retain the original team of producers and writers.[38]CEO of Nine Entertainment Co., Hugh Marks, revealed his role in the program's reintroduction, citing his belief that the series would still be relevant in an updated climate, while expecting significantly lower viewership.[39] After auditions were held in November 2016, the new cast was revealed in December.[40][41] The series began production in January 2017 and premiered on Nine's multichannel, 9Go!, on 15 May.[7][42] A second series of the revival was planned for 2018, before filming was halted and the Australian production office was closed.[43][44][45]

Educational theory[edit]

Hi-5 was designed by educational experts to appeal to contemporary, "media-literate" children by relating to their world.[1] The series has been described as "for the kids of today".[5][15] The cast are presented as older siblings to the children, educating the audience in a fun and entertaining way, through "play based learning", rather than appearing as adults who are teaching them.[46] The educational theories of the series are disguised with music and entertainment, with the multiple layers of the show catering for a wide range of ages in the audience, while being primarily aimed at those aged 2–8.[1][17] The real-life messages of the show are reinforced in an entertaining way.[46]

Harris and Graeme-Evans based the series around an underlying educational structure, primarily using Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences. It is recognised that each child learns in a different way, and each cast member has a specific segment within the show which targets a different aspect of learning, ranging from logical-mathematical thinking to a focus on linguistic skills, to cater to a child's individual learning approach.[5] Harris observed that most viewers had a favourite cast member, believing that children generally "respond more favourably to the presenter who models the learning style they prefer".[17][46] The use of multiple segments is also designed to hold the attention span of young children.[6] The skills of pre-numeracy and pre-literacy are a focus of the educational theory, to prepare children for learning at school, while also encouraging self-confidence and expression.[47] According to the show's website, Hi-5 also uses Piaget's theory of cognitive development, providing a learning experience that promotes individual growth.[48]

Music and movement play a large part integrating the elements of Hi-5 together, with music reinforcing the central ideas which the series presents, while also being entertaining. Physical interaction is encouraged, and heavily featured to make the show relatively fast-paced, originally to replicate the energy of contemporary music videos.[17] Dancing is featured, with a focus on movements that increase the integration between the left and right sides of the brain.[11][48]

Cast[edit]

The program features five presenters who are known collectively as Hi-5. The cast became a recognised musical group for children, outside of the television program.

Original series (1999–2011)[edit]

Revived series (2017)[edit]

  • Courtney Clarke (Series 1)
  • Shay Clifford (Series 1)
  • Lachie Dearing (Series 1)
  • Joe Kalou (Series 1)
  • Bailey Spalding (Series 1)

Episodes[edit]

Main article: List of Hi-5 episodes

Original series[edit]

Revived series[edit]

Reception[edit]

Viewership[edit]

The first series of Hi-5 was broadcast in 1999 and quadrupled the ratings and audience share in its timeslot, previously occupied by programs including Here's Humphrey.[13]Hi-5 averaged a national audience of 223,000 in 1999, which was a 32.2% increase on Humphrey.[13] The first four weeks of broadcast achieved an average of 231,000 viewers.[20]

Hi-5's highest rating episode in 2001 was watched by 96,000 children aged 0–14. In 2005, Hi-5 was one of the top ten children's programs (classified C or P) on commercial television in the 0–14 age group. Its average audience was 60,000 in this bracket. It was the highest rating P program in the 0–4 age group, receiving an average viewership of 39,000.[54]

Hi-5 was consistently the highest rating program on Disney Junior Asia from its premiere in 2012 to 2016.[55]

In Australia, the premiere run of the Hi-5 revival in 2017 averaged a viewership of 10,000.[56]

Critical reception[edit]

The series received generally positive reviews. Hi-5 was described by US magazine Kidscreen as a "combination of Spice Girls-esque musical performances and Sesame Street educational content".[18] The cast's performance was described by Sally Murphy of Aussiereviews.com as "bright, full of music and catchy tunes,"[57] with the original line-up praised by the website's Magdalena Ball for their "consistent camaraderie, [and] varied and well coordinated talent as singers, performers, and dancers."[58] Ball credited their appeal to the members being positive role models.[59]

The program has generated debate about what is considered appropriate television for children. In a 2011 survey by the Australian Council on Children and the Media (ACCM), Hi-5 was identified by parents as a "controversial program", eliciting both positive and negative evaluations about its quality.[60] Some surveyed parents expressed concern that the clothes and costuming of the cast was inappropriate for a young audience, and labelled it as "premature sexualisation".[60] However, in 2002, Harris stated that the producers were very careful about addressing body image issues and keeping the cast "concealed", believing Hi-5 helped to influence appropriate fashion in young people.[61]

Joly Herman of Common Sense Media questioned the quality and consistency of the program's educational material, noting the use of music as "arbitrary".[62] On the contrary, a sample of parents in the ACCM survey praised Hi-5, listing it as an example of a musical program which is not "coupled with commercialism".[60]

Release[edit]

Broadcast[edit]

The first series of Hi-5 was sold to New Zealand and Singapore. In 2000, there were expression of interests from Britain, Canada, Germany, Israel and South Africa.[13] The TV series had a successful premiere in the UK in early 2003.[1][63] Initially, Harris expected that the series would become formatted into international versions, however, she was so confident with the original cast that the Australian series was sold overseas instead.[1] On pay-TV in Australia, Hi-5 premiered on Nick Jr. in 2003.[64] The programme debuted in the US for the first time in 2014, with episodes featuring the original cast premiering on KCET.[65]

The 2017 revival series was released on online streaming service Stan on 1 October 2017.[66]

Home video[edit]

Main article: List of Hi-5 home video releases

Compilation home video releases of Hi-5 have been distributed on VHS and DVD in Australia by Roadshow Entertainment.[67]

Other media[edit]

Music[edit]

Main article: Hi-5 (Australian group)

With the television series using music as an integral part of its concept, the cast of the series became a recognised musical group for children outside of the show. The debut album of the group, Jump and Jive with Hi-5, corresponded with the first series of the show and was released in September 1999 by Sony Music, reaching No. 33 on the ARIA Albums Chart.[68] The group performed at venues such as the Newcastle Civic Theatre in their first year.[4] Hi-5 won five consecutive ARIA Awards for Best Children's Album, their albums received multiple sale accreditations, and four releases reached the top 10 on the ARIA Albums Chart.[68][69] The group also toured nationally every year, with sell-out national tours of their early stage shows, in venues such as the Sydney Opera House.[13] In 2001, the group members said they did not expect that Hi-5 would become so successful; Robinson explained it was not until they went on tour that they realised their popularity.[70]

The music of the show has a distinguishable pop music sound, being described as "pop for kids" by Crawford in 2001 and Foley in 2004.[70][71] Chris Harriott is the primary composer of the show, having written thousands of Hi-5 songs (including feature songs of the week and shorter songlets) thus creating a sense of musical consistency. Graeme-Evans and Harriott had worked together when he scored the theme for the teen drama series, Mirror, Mirror (1995).[10] He had previously worked with Harris as a composer on Bananas in Pyjamas; and had individually worked in Australian theatre.[51][72][73] He was originally approached by the creators with the task of writing top ten songs for an age range of 2–6.[51] Robinson said members were encouraged to write their own music for the group, and as of 2015, she was still receiving occasional royalty cheques for her work.[30]

Spin-off series[edit]

Main article: Hi-5 House

In 2013, a spin-off series entitled Hi-5 House was created under new management to continue the Hi-5 concept with a refreshed appeal. The new series remained similar to the original concept, but featured a new setting; a house in which the cast members would live and present the show. The Nine Network were not involved in the follow-up series. The series premiered on Nick Jr. on 4 November 2013, and ran until 2016.[8]

International versions[edit]

The international appeal of Hi-5 has led to successful local versions of the television series. In 2002, an American Hi-5 series was created, airing from 2003 to 2006 on TLC and Discovery Kids, also being nominated for a Daytime Emmy in 2005, 2006, and 2007.[74][75] A UK series aired on Cartoonito in 2008.[76][77] After Hi-5's sale in 2012, there was a return to licensing international versions of the program. A Latin American series entitled Hi-5 Fiesta aired from 2014 to 2016 on Discovery Kids, followed by a local version for the Philippines airing over 2015 and 2016, and the debut of an Indonesian series in 2017.[78][79][80]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Notes[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi-5_(Australian_TV_series)

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