Collection of mana wikipedia

Collection of mana wikipedia DEFAULT

Collection Of Mana Is 3 Amazing Games With Not Enough Extra Features

Image for article titled Collection Of Mana Is 3 Amazing Games With Not Enough Extra Features

One of the first Switch games I bought, way back in the spring of 2017, was the Japanese version of Collection of Mana. It was a very simple package: emulated versions of the first three games in the Mana series, and little else. Two years later, the U.S. version is out, and not much has changed.

Collection of Mana is a $40 package containing the first three games in the Mana series: Final Fantasy Adventure for the Game Boy (from back when the series was more explicitly a Final Fantasy spinoff), the widely beloved Secret of Mana for Super NES, and Trials of Mana.

What’s Trials of Mana? It’s the new official U.S. name for Seiken Densetsu 3, the Super Nintendo sequel to Secret that came out in 1995 in Japan but was famously never released in the West until just this week. Square Enix is now releasing it twice: once as a full modern remake coming in 2020, and once in its original 16-bit form in this collection.

It’s really a crime that it took this long to get here officially, since Trials is a 16-bit masterpiece with beautiful graphics, an ass-kicking soundtrack from Secret’s composer Hiroki Kikuta, and...well, the combat’s a bit janky, but what Mana game’s isn’t?

Square Enix has now translated the whole game into English, which, as any fan translator that works with old games could tell you, is no small feat of reverse engineering. It’s even got a nice, very readable variable-width English font that lets them cram in all the game’s dialogue, which Super Nintendo translations rarely got back in the day.

G/O Media may get a commission

He... hewwo? Twanslatow? This is weally annoying to wead.

Meanwhile, Secret of Mana is actually an excellent example of what happens when you don’t change the font size and kerning when you go from Japanese to English, and you can see the results of that in this collection too, since the translations of the first two games are untouched.

It’s not ugly or anything, but the letters take up so much space that you can see why the game’s script had to be cut to shreds when it was translated.

So let’s be clear: It is freaking awesome that Square Enix translated Seiken 3 for this collection. New translations of old games happen very rarely, and this is surely the most complex old-game translation project that’s ever been officially done at a game publisher. It probably helps that this was made by the emulation wizards at M2, which also did Konami’s recent Castlevania and Contra collections for Switch. A lot of effort has been put in to get this collection out of Japan and I’m excited to have it.

That said, I’d be remiss if I didn’t note that Collection of Mana is just about as bare-bones as a retro collection can be. There’s a music player and a few different graphical options for the display, and that’s it. As I pointed out when the collection originally came out in Japan, it doesn’t even have manuals that tell you how to play the games. It does have a very basic graphic that shows the control-scheme layout, but it doesn’t explain how the games work. That’s a problem since these are pretty complicated RPGs that, like most other games from the era, don’t explain themselves. Trials of Mana, in particular, is a complex game that originally came with a 48-page manual packed densely with tiny text explaining all its facets.

In fact, when Collection of Mana came out in Japan in 2017, players immediately complained about its lack of manuals. Within days, Square Enix uploaded some to the web, and then issued a software update that added digital manuals to the game itself. These are missing from the U.S. version, and I think a lot of players are going to be racing to GameFAQs in the days to come.

Collection of Mana is a simple release, but that simplicity also has its upsides. Square Enix generally seems to be under the impression that if it rereleases its classic games, it has to put a gross graphical filter over them, change the font to Arial, and do other totally unnecessary things in the name of “progress” when all anybody wants is just the original games running in good emulation. This. This is what Final Fantasy, Chrono Trigger, and Square’s other classic games deserve, and nothing less.

CultureKotaku Game Diary

Sours: https://kotaku.com/collection-of-mana-is-3-amazing-games-with-not-enough-e-1835460264

Collection of Mana

Composer(s)

Kenji Ito
Nobuo Uematsu
Hiroki Kikuta

Release Date(s)

JPJune 1, 2017

NA June 11, 2019

Collection of Mana(聖剣伝説 COLLECTION, lit. "Holy Sword Legend Collection") is an anthology release of the first three titles of the Mana series. It was released initially in Japan on June 1, 2017, including Final Fantasy Adventure, Secret of Mana, and Seiken Densetsu 3in their original formats. The collection was launched in the West on June 11, 2019 with a localized version of Seiken Densetsu 3, now titled Trials of Mana.

External links[]

This article or section is a stub. You can help the Wiki of Mana by expanding it.

Sours: https://mana.fandom.com/wiki/Collection_of_Mana
  1. Ouat fanfiction
  2. Energy suspension
  3. Mova steel
  4. Estate sales middletown, ohio
  5. Ccm motorcycles

The Mana series, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu (聖剣伝説 lit. "Holy Sword Legend"), is a fantasy action role-playing game series developed and published by Square Enix and created by Kōichi Ishii. The series began as a handheld side story to Square's flagship franchise Final Fantasy, although most Final Fantasy-inspired elements were subsequently dropped, starting with the second installment, Secret of Mana. It has since grown to include games of various genres within the fictional world of Mana, with recurring stories involving a world tree, its associated holy sword, and the fight against forces that would steal their power. Several character designs, creatures, and musical themes reappear frequently.

In 2003, the series comprised five games; since 2005, it has experienced a revival through the World of Mana campaign, with five new games released in the span of one year. As of 2007, the Mana series comprises eight console games and two mobile games, in addition to four manga and one novelization. The Mana series reception has been very uneven, with Secret of Mana earning wide acclaim, such as being rated 78th in IGN's yearly "Top 100 Games of All Time", and being highly praised for its musical score, while the games from the World of Mana series have been rated considerably lower.

As Ishii had left Square Enix in 2007 to operate his own company, Grezzo Games, the Mana series has seen no new development. Several titles, however have been remastered under the care of Square Enix and project supervisor Masaru Oyamada.

List of games released[]

Ishii team[]

Releases
Ports
Original title (Japanese) Localized title (English) Release Platform(s)
Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden Mobile (n/a)2006 Mobile phones
Canceled
Original title (Japanese) Localized title (English) Console
Seiken Densetsu: Legend of Mana 2Legend of Mana 2PlayStation
Shin'yaku Seiken Densetsu 2Sword of Mana 2Game Boy Advance
Unnamed Seiken Densetsu Unnamed Mana Wii

Oyamada team[]

Releases
Original title (Japanese) Localized title (English) Release Platform(s)
Seiken Densetsu: Circle of Mana(n/a)2013 iOS, Android
Seiken Densetsu: Rise of Mana(n/a)2014 iOS, Android, PS Vita
Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden HD Adventures of Mana2016 PS Vita, iOS, Android
Seiken Densetsu 2 HDSecret of Mana HD2018 PlayStation 4, PS Vita, Steam (PC)
Seiken Densetsu 3: Trials of ManaTrials of Mana HDApril 24, 2020 PlayStation 4, Switch, Steam (PC)
Seiken Densetsu: Legend of ManaLegend of ManaJune 24, 2021 PlayStation 4, Switch, Steam (PC)
Seiken Densetsu: Echoes of ManaEchoes of ManaTBD 2022 TBD
Ports
Original title (Japanese) Localized title (English) Release Platform(s)
Seiken Densetsu 2 Mobile Secret of Mana2010 iOS, Android
Seiken Densetsu 3: Trials of ManaTrials of ManaJuly 23, 2021 iOS, Android
Seiken Densetsu CollectionCollection of Mana2017 Nintendo Switch

World[]

The Mana series, much like other Square Enix titles such as Final Fantasy, is an anthology series. As a result, all the entries take place in separate settings without any direct link to each other. These settings do share common elements, however, primarily the Mana Tree and Mana Sword. Other elements, such as the Vandole Empire, also are occasionally shared (much like Garland or Cid in Final Fantasy).[1]

There are two notable exceptions to this, however: Children of Mana shares the same world as Dawn of Mana, occurring about ten years afterward, while Heroes of Mana shares the same world as Trials of Mana, occurring "one generation" prior.[2]

Development[]

History[]

Square trademarked the title Seiken Densetsu: The Emergence of Excalibur in 1987, intending to use it for a game project led by Kazuhiko Aoki for the Famicom Disk System. According to early advertisements, the game would consist of an unprecedented five floppy disks, making it one of the largest titles developed for the Famicom up until that point. Although Square solicited pre-orders for the game, Kaoru Moriyama, a former Square employee, confirmed that management canceled the ambitious project before it advanced beyond the early planning stages. In October 1987, customers who had placed orders were sent a letter informing them of the cancellation and had their purchases refunded. The letter also suggested to consider placing an order on another upcoming Square role-playing game in a similar vein: Final Fantasy.

In 1991, Square reused the Seiken Densetsu trademark for an unrelated Game Boy action role-playing game directed by Kōichi Ishii. Originally developed under the title Gemma Knights, the game was renamed Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden (published in North America as Final Fantasy Adventure and in Europe as Mystic Quest). Beginning with Secret of Mana, Seiken Densetsu was subsequently "spun off" into its own series of action role-playing games distinct from Final Fantasy, with four titles released between 1993 and 2003. Legend of Mana was made 2D because the PlayStation could not handle the full 3D world he envisioned where one could interact with natural objects. In 2005, Square Enix announced plans for the World of Mana, a new series of titles in the Mana franchise, whose titles would span more video game genres than the original series. Kōichi Ishii decided even before he worked on Final Fantasy XI about creating new Mana games, but first wanted to create a goal for the new series, and eventually decided to make it about exploring how to add "the feeling of touch" to a game. After he saw the game Half-Life 2 at E3 in 2003, he felt that its physics engine was the one he needed. As of February, the World of Mana comprises five games and one manga, with the possibility of a Wii game under discussion. Until his exit in 2007, Ishii served as director or producer for all Mana games.

Creation and design[]

The Mana series is the result of Kōichi Ishii's desire to create a fictional world. In Ishii's opinion, Mana is not a series of video games, but rather a world which is illustrated by and can be explored through video games. When working on the series, Ishii draws inspiration from abstract images from his memories of childhood, as well as movies and fantasy books that captivated him as a child. Ishii takes care to avoid set conventions, and his influences are correspondingly very wide and non-specific. Nonetheless, among his literary influences, he acknowledges Tove Jansson's Moomin, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.

Unlike the majority of the Square repetorire, Mana presents itself with a core aesthetic theme of innocence through cute and clean designs, giving itself the impression of that of a modern fairy tale or light fantasy epic. Much of this can be traced back to the first installment of the series, Sword of Mana, in its Final Fantasy Adventure incarnation for the Game Boy. Though its presentation is light and adoring, this does not detract from presenting more mature and darker story elements and themes along the course of its stories, and some installments go for a more intricate edge when complexity and maturity are needed, complimenting the lighthearted design focus.

While some titles of the World of Mana series do share direct connections with other installments, the games of the series have few concrete links. There is no overall explicit in-game chronological order. Furthermore, according to Ishii, the games do not take place in exactly the same world, and characters or elements who appear in different titles are to be considered alternate versions of each other. Instead, the connections between each title are more abstract than story-based, linked only on the karmic level.

Common elements[]

A common element of the series is its seamless, real-time battle system. The system was developed by Kōichi Ishii and improved upon by Hiromichi Tanaka, out of a desire to create a system different than the one featured in the first few Final Fantasy titles. While action-based, the Mana battle system is intended to be playable even by newcomers as well as veterans. The system is coupled with the distinctive hierarchical "Ring Command" menu system, featured prominently in Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana, and to a lesser extent in later installments. Each ring is a set of icons with a textual infobox explanation which, upon selection, allow the player to use an item, cast a spell, look up in-game statistics, or change the game's settings. Navigation within a menu is achieved by rotating the ring through the cursor left or right, while switching to a different menu is achieved by pressing the up or down buttons. Although not part of the series, the spin-off Secret of Evermore, developed by Square USA, was also built upon the "Ring Command" system.

The Mana series features several recurring characters and beings, including Final Fantasy creatures such as Chocobos in Final Fantasy Adventure and Legend of Mana, as well as Moogles in Secret of Mana and as a status ailment in Trials of Mana and Sword of Mana. Watts is a dwarven blacksmith who upgrades the player's weaponry. Usually, an anthropomorphic cat merchant is found outside of town areas and allows a player to save the game and buy supplies at higher-than-normal prices. This role is played by Neko in Secret of Mana, and the rabbit-like Niccolo in Legend of Mana and Sword of Mana. In the Japanese games, these merchants share the name Nikita.

The Mana Tree and the Mana Sword are recurring plot devices which have been featured in every game of the series. The mystical Mana Tree is a source of magic which sustains the balance and nature of the series' world. The Mana Sword is typically used to restore this balance when it becomes lost in the games. Final Fantasy Adventure explains that if the Mana Tree dies, a member of the Mana Family will become the "seed" of a new Tree. A sprout of the Mana Tree is called a Gemma, while protectors of the Tree, who wield the Mana Sword, are called Gemma Knights. In Trials of Mana and Sword of Mana, a goddess is said to have turned into the Mana Tree after creating the world with the Mana Sword. The Mana Tree is destroyed near the endings of Final Fantasy Adventure and Secret of Mana, but a character becomes the new Mana Tree in the former game.

Mana spirits[]

The Mana Spirits, also known as Elemental Spirits, are beings who govern the magic elements of the series' world, and are at the core of the games' magic system as they are used to cast magic spells. Eight types of spirits have appeared in the series since Secret of Mana, and each embodies a different element. Their names are homonyms of mythological beings or phenomena. In Secret of Mana and Seiken Densetsu 3, usage of their power is enabled upon the main characters' meeting with them. In Legend of Mana, the spirits serve as factors in the Land Creation System. In Legend of Mana and Sword of Mana, multiple spirits of the same elemental type appear. In terms of storyline, in Seiken Densetsu 3 and Heroes of Mana, the spirits are charged to protect the Mana Stones in which the Mana Goddess sealed eight elemental benevodons. In the English dub of Dawn of Mana, each spirit speaks with a particular European accent, such as French or Scottish.

Rabites[]

Rabites, known as Rabi (ラビ) in the Japanese versions of the games, are cute, fictional, rabbit-like creatures appearing as a common enemy in the series since its beginning. The Rabite has become a sort of mascot for the Mana series. The Rabite resembles a bodiless, one-toothed rabbit with large ears that curve upward and form a point at the tip and a round, puffy pink tail. Rabites move by hopping along the ground. They are most commonly yellow, but there are also variants in different colors, such as pink, lilac, black, green, and white. Rabites are most commonly simply minor enemies, but some variants are "superboss" characters and even friendly units and pets. Rabites have appeared prevalently in several pieces of Mana merchandise, including plush dolls, cushions, lighters, mousepads, straps, telephone cards, and T-shirts.

Flammie[]

Flammie, sometimes spelled "Flammy", is the name of a species of flying dragons, as well as the proper name of some of its members, featured in several games of the series. A Flammie's appearance is a mixture of draconian, mammalian, and reptilian features, and its coloring has varied throughout the series. Flammies typically serve as a means of transportation in the game by allowing a player's characters to ride on a Flammie's back to different locations in the game's world. In Secret of Mana and Seiken Densetsu 3, the SNES's Mode 7 graphic capabilities allows the player to control a Flammie from either a "behind the back" third-person or top-down perspective, and fly over the landscape as it scrolls beneath them. In Children of Mana, the player selects on a world map a number of destinations he or she wishes to fly to with a Flammie. In terms of story, the Flammies were created by the Moon Gods, and are part of an endless cycle of destruction and rebirth as the stronger versions of Flammies known as Mana Beasts ("God Beasts" (神獣 Shinjū) in the Japanese versions of the game) destroy the world and the Tree and Sword restore it.

Music[]

The Mana series has had several different composers. Final Fantasy Adventure was composed by Kenji Ito; it was his second original score. Ito's music is mainly inspired by images from the game rather than outside influences. The scores for Secret of Mana and Seiken Densetsu 3 were both composed by Hiroki Kikuta. Despite difficulties in dealing with the hardware limitations, Kikuta tried to express in the music of Secret of Mana two "contrasting styles", namely himself and the game. This was to create an original score which would be neither pop music nor standard game music. Kikuta worked on the music for the two games mostly by himself, spending nearly 24 hours a day in his office, alternating between composing and editing to create an immersive three-dimensional sound. Kikuta considers the score for Secret of Mana his favorite creation. In 1995, Kikuta released an experimental album of arranged music from the two installments, titled Secret of Mana +, which features one 50-minute long track.

Legend of Mana's score was composed by Yoko Shimomura, and of all her compositions, she considers it the one that best expresses herself. Kenji Ito returned to the series with Sword of Mana. He also composed roughly one third of the Children of Mana soundtrack, while the rest was composed by Masaharu Iwata and Takayuki Aihara. Ito was the main composer for Dawn of Mana, assisted by Tsuyoshi Sekito, Masayoshi Soken, and Junya Nakano, as well as main theme composer Ryuichi Sakamoto. In North America, purchasers of Dawn of Mana from participating retailers were offered a sampler disc, titled Breath of Mana, which features a selection of tracks from the game.

Printed adaptations[]

A 5-volume manga based on Legend of Mana was drawn by Shiro Amano and published in Japan by Enterbrain between 2000 and 2002. It features a comedic story about the game's main character, here named Toto. A German version was published by Egmont Manga & Anime in 2003. A collection of 4-panel comic strips, drawn by various authors and titled Sword of Mana Yonkoma Manga Theatre, was published in Japan by Square Enix on 16 January 2004. It included a questionnaire that, if sent back, allowed participants to win illustrations signed by Kōichi Ishii and Shinichi Kameoka, as well as special T-shirts. Enterbrain also published a Sword of Mana manga adaptation in Japan on 25 February 2004, drawn by a collaboration of authors led by Shiro Amano. Two days later, Square Enix published a two-volume novelization of Sword of Mana in Japan, written by Matsui Oohama. An original manga, named Seiken Densetsu: Princess of Mana, was drawn by Satsuki Yoshino and published in the Japanese magazine Gangan Powered on 22 February 2007.

Reception[]

The Mana series has been mostly well received, though each title has seen varied levels of success. RPGFan called Final Fantasy Adventure one of the best things to happen to the Game Boy, while IGN considered it the best action RPG on the console after The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening. GameSpot referred to Secret of Mana as "one of Square's masterpieces on the SNES". The game has appeared on several list of top games, including ranked number 97 on Famitsu's top 100 games of all time. Famitsu rated Legend of Mana at 31/40 and Children of Mana at 32/40. The NPD Group ranked Legend of Mana as the top seller the week of its release, and in 2006 was re-released as part of the Ultimate Hits series.

Many of the World of Mana titles have not been as critically successful as the original five games in the series, and though the franchise has been praised for their attempts at trying new ways of experiencing the games fictional world, there have been various gameplay design flaws that have hindered the later games. GameSpot commented that despite the game's excellent presentation, Legend of Mana did not match the level of gameplay of its predecessors. Prior to the World of Mana games, RPGamer called the series a "treasured favorite". After the release of Heroes of Mana, they commented that the World of Mana series is "cursed", and the future of the series looked "bleak".

The music of the Mana series, especially Secret of Mana, has received wide acclaim and fan enthusiasm. The Secret of Mana soundtrack was one of the first official soundtracks of video games music released in the United States, preceding the mainstream interest in RPGs. The Secret of Mana's opening theme, "Angel's Fear", was rated at number 7 on IGN's 10 Ten RPG Title tracks, calling it a "magical title song that captures our hearts". It was also featured in the third Orchestral Game Concert. Secret of Mana is also the number 6 most remixed soundtrack on the popular video game music site OverClocked ReMix, with Seiken Densetsu 3 tied at 18. The music of the other titles have also been well received. RPGFan called the music to Final Fantasy Adventure "addictive", despite its low, MIDI-like quality. GameSpy called Children of Mana's music some of the best Nintendo DS music yet and referred to it as "beautiful". Game Informer complimented Dawn of Mana's music, calling it good. IGN referred to Legend of Mana's music as "beautiful" and stated the background music brought "intensity", "suspense", and "subtle nuance" to the game. Other reviewers echoed similar praise with GameSpot calling it "excellently orchestrated" and RPGFan calling the music one of the game's good points.

External link[]

References[]

Sours: https://mana.fandom.com/wiki/Mana_(series)
Maná - Sergio Vallin tutorial para tocar “reloj cucú”.

Secret of Mana

1993 video game

1993 video game

Secret of Mana
Secret of Mana Box.jpg
Developer(s)Square
Publisher(s)Square
Director(s)Koichi Ishii
Producer(s)Hiromichi Tanaka
Designer(s)
  • Koichi Ishii
  • Hiromichi Tanaka
Programmer(s)Nasir Gebelli
Artist(s)
Writer(s)Hiromichi Tanaka
Composer(s)Hiroki Kikuta
SeriesMana
Platform(s)Super NES, FOMA 903i/703i, iOS, Android, Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita
Release

August 6, 1993

  • SNES
    • JP: August 6, 1993
    • NA: October 3, 1993
    • PAL: November 24, 1994
    FOMA 903i/703iiOSAndroidWindows, PS4, Vita
    (3D Remake)
Genre(s)Action role-playing
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Secret of Mana, originally released in Japan as Seiken Densetsu 2,[a] is a 1993 action role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. It is the sequel to the 1991 game Seiken Densetsu, released in North America as Final Fantasy Adventure and in Europe as Mystic Quest, and it was the first Seiken Densetsu title to be marketed as part of the Mana series rather than the Final Fantasy series. Set in a high fantasy universe, the game follows three heroes as they attempt to prevent an empire from conquering the world with the power of an ancient flying fortress.

Rather than using a turn-based battle system like contemporaneous role-playing games, Secret of Mana features real-time battles with a power bar mechanic. The game has a unique Ring Command menu system, which pauses the action and allows the player to make decisions in the middle of battle. An innovative cooperativemultiplayer system allows a second or third player to drop in and out of the game at any time. Secret of Mana was directed and designed by Koichi Ishii, programmed primarily by Nasir Gebelli, and produced by veteran Square designer Hiromichi Tanaka.

The game received considerable acclaim for its brightly colored graphics, expansive plot, Ring Command menu system, and innovative real-time battle system. Critics also praised the soundtrack by Hiroki Kikuta and the customizable artificial intelligence (AI) settings for computer-controlled allies.

The original version was released for the Wii'sVirtual Console in Japan in September 2008, and for the Wii U's Virtual Console in June 2013. The game was ported to mobile phones in Japan in 2009, and an enhanced port of the game was released for iOS in 2010 and Android in 2014. It was included in the Collection of Mana release for the Nintendo Switch in Japan in June 2017 and North America in June 2019. Nintendo also re-released Secret of Mana in September 2017 as part of the company's Super NES Classic Edition. A full 3D remake was released for the PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, and Microsoft Windows in February 2018.

Gameplay[edit]

The standard overhead view. The party's attack strength and remaining healthis shown in the gauges at the bottom.
Flammie flying and demonstrating Mode 7

Like many other role-playing games of the 16-bit era, Secret of Mana displays a top-down perspective, in which the player characters navigate the terrain and fight off hostile creatures. The game features three such characters: the hero, the girl, and the sprite, named Randi, Primm, and Popoi outside the initial North American and European releases. The player can choose to control each of the characters at any time; whichever character is currently selected, the other two companions are controlled via artificial intelligence. The game may be played simultaneously by up to three players,[1][2] made possible by the Super Multitap accessory for the Super NES console.[3] The Virtual Console version of the game supports three-player gameplay via additional GameCube controllers or Classic Controllers.[4]

Each character possesses individual strengths and weaknesses. The hero, while unable to use magic, masters weapons at a quicker rate; the girl is a healer, able to cast restorative and support spells; and the sprite casts offensive magic to damage and impair enemies.[4] Upon collecting enough experience points in battle, each character increases in level and improves in areas such as strength and evasion. The trio can rest in towns, where they can regain hit points or purchase restorative items and equipment. Options such as changing equipment, casting spells, or checking status are performed by cycling through the game's Ring Commands, a circular menu which hovers over the currently controlled party member.[2][3][4] The game is momentarily paused whenever the Ring Commands appear.[5]

Combat takes place in real-time.[2] Located at the bottom of the screen is a power bar,[6][7] a gauge that determines the amount of damage done to an enemy when attacking. Swinging a weapon causes the gauge to empty and then quickly recharge, allowing that character to attack at full strength. The party wields eight different types of weaponry: sword, spear, bow, axe, boomerang, glove, whip, and javelin. All weapons can be upgraded eight times, and repeated use of a weapon increases its skill level to a maximum of eight, unlocking a new special attack with each level. Weapons are upgraded with Weapon Orbs, which are found in dungeons or earned by defeating certain bosses.[2] The player takes each Orb to a blacksmith, located in most towns, who uses it to reforge one weapon.[1][8]

In order to learn magic, the party must rescue spirits known as Elementals. The eight Elementals represent different elements—such as water, earth, and life—and each provides the player with specific spells. Magic has skill levels similar to weapons, but each magic spell costs magic points to cast.[1]

At the start of the game, to reach a destination players must traverse an enemy-infested countryside. Travel may be expedited with Cannon Travel Centers, where the party may be launched to faraway destinations via a giant cannon. Cannon Travel usually requires a fee, but is mandatory to visit other continents later on.[3] Later, the party is given access to Flammie, a miniature dragon which is controlled by the player and able to fly freely across the world, represented by an overworld map.[9] These sequences make use of the SNES's Mode 7 capability to create a rotatable background, giving the illusion that the ground beneath Flammie is rendered in three dimensions. While riding Flammie, the player may access either the "rotated map", which presents the world as a globe, or the "world map", a two-dimensional view of the overworld.[10]

Plot[edit]

Setting and characters[edit]

The story takes place in a high fantasy world, which contains an ethereal energy source named "mana". An ancient, technologically advanced civilization exploited mana to construct the "Mana Fortress", a flying warship. This angered the world's gods, who sent giant beasts to war with the civilization. The conflict was globally destructive and nearly exhausted all signs of mana in the world, until a hero used the power of the Mana Sword to destroy the fortress and the civilization. The world began to recover in peace. As the game opens, an empire seeks eight Mana Seeds, which when "unsealed" will restore mana to the world and allow the empire to restore the Mana Fortress.[11]

The three main characters do not have names in the original SNES release, though their names appear in the manual of the Japanese release; their names were added into the game in the iOS port worldwide. In all versions, the player can choose to name the characters whatever they wish. The hero (ランディ, Randi),[12] a young boy, is adopted by the Elder of Potos before the start of the game, after the boy's mother disappears. The girl (プリム, Primm)[12] is in love with a warrior named Dyluck, who was ordered by the king to attack Elinee's Castle. Angered by the king's actions and by her father's attempt to arrange her marriage to a local nobleman, she leaves the castle to save Dyluck and to accompany the hero as well.[13] The hero meets a sprite child (ポポイ, Popoi)[12] at the Dwarf Village (he meets her later in the witch's forest). The sprite lives with a dwarf and goes with the characters to learn more about their family. It does not remember anything about its past, so it joins the team to try to recover its memories.[14]

Story[edit]

The game begins as three boys from the small Potos village disobey their Elder's instructions and trespass into a local waterfall, where a treasure is said to be kept. One of the boys stumbles and falls into the lake, where he finds a rusty sword embedded in a stone. Guided by a disembodied voice, he pulls the sword free, inadvertently unleashing monsters in the surrounding countryside of the village. The villagers interpret the sword's removal as a bad omen and banish the boy from Potos forever.[15] A traveling knight named Jema recognizes the blade as the legendary Mana Sword and encourages the hero to re-energize it by visiting the eight Mana Temples.[16]

During his journey, the hero is joined by the girl and the sprite. Throughout their travels, the trio is pursued by the Empire. The Emperor and his subordinates are being manipulated by Thanatos, an ancient sorcerer who hopes to create a "new, peaceful world".[17] Due to his own body's deterioration, Thanatos is in need of a suitable body to possess. After placing the entire kingdom of Pandora under a trance, he abducts two candidates: Dyluck, now enslaved, and a young Pandoran girl named Phanna; he eventually chooses to possess Dyluck.[18]

The Empire succeeds in unsealing all eight Mana Seeds. However, Thanatos betrays the Emperor and his henchmen, killing them and seizing control of the Mana Fortress for himself. The hero and his party journey to locate the Mana Tree, the focal point of the world's life energy. Anticipating their arrival, Thanatos positions the Mana Fortress over the Tree and destroys it. The charred remains of the Tree speak to the heroes, explaining that a giant dragon called the Mana Beast will soon be summoned to combat the Fortress. The Beast has little control over its rage and will likely destroy the world as well.[19] The Mana Tree also reveals that it was once the human wife of Serin, the original Mana Knight and the hero's father. The voice heard at Potos' waterfall was that of Serin's ghost.[20]

The trio flies to the Mana Fortress and confronts Thanatos, who is preparing to transfer his mind into Dyluck. With the last of his strength, Dyluck warns that Thanatos has sold his soul to the underworld and must not be allowed to have the Fortress.[21] Dyluck kills himself, forcing Thanatos to revert to a skeletal lich form, which the party defeats. The Mana Beast finally flies in and attacks the Fortress. The hero expresses reluctance to kill the Beast, fearing that with the dispersal of Mana from the world, the sprite will vanish.[22] With the sprite's encouragement, he uses the fully energized Mana Sword to slay the Beast, causing it to explode and transform into snow.[23] At the conclusion of the game, the sprite child vanishes into an astral plane, the girl is returned home and the hero is seen welcomed back in Potos, returning the Mana Sword to its place beneath the waterfall.

Development[edit]

Secret of Manawriter and producer Hiromichi Tanaka

Secret of Mana was directed and designed by Koichi Ishii, the creator of the game's Game Boy predecessor, Final Fantasy Adventure. He has stated that he feels Secret of Mana is more "his game" than other projects he has worked on, such as the Final Fantasy series.[24] The game was programmed primarily by Nasir Gebelli and produced by veteran Square designer Hiromichi Tanaka. The team hoped to build on the foundation of Final Fantasy Adventure, and they included several modified elements from that game and from other popular Square titles in Secret of Mana. In addition to having better graphics and sound quality than its predecessor, the attack power gauge was changed to be more engaging, and the weapon leveling system replaced Final Fantasy Adventure's system of leveling up the speed of the attack gauge.[7] The party system also received an upgrade from the first Mana game: instead of temporary companions who could not be upgraded, party members became permanent protagonists and could be controlled by other players.[7] The multiplayer component was not a part of the original design, but was added when the developers realized that they could easily make all three characters human-controlled.[24]

The real-time battle system used in Secret of Mana has been described by its creators as an extension of the battle system used in the first three flagship Final Fantasy titles. The system for experience points and leveling up was taken from Final Fantasy III.[25] According to Tanaka, the game's battle system features mechanics that had first been considered for Final Fantasy IV. Similarly, unused features in Secret of Mana were appropriated by the Chrono Trigger team, which (like Final Fantasy IV) was in production at the time.[24] According to Tanaka, the project was originally intended to be Final Fantasy IV, with a "more action-based, dynamic overworld". However, it "wound up not being" Final Fantasy IV anymore, but instead became a separate project codenamed "Chrono Trigger" during development, before finally becoming Seiken Densetsu 2. Tanaka said that it "always felt like a sequel" to Final Fantasy III for him.[26]

Secret of Mana was originally planned to be a launch title for the SNES-CD add-on.[27][28] After the contract between Nintendo and Sony to produce the add-on failed, and Sony repurposed its work on the SNES-CD into the competing PlayStation console, Square adapted the game for the SNES cartridge format. The game had to be altered to fit the storage space of a SNES game cartridge, which is much smaller than that of a CD-ROM.[29] The developers initially resisted continuing the project without the CD add-on, believing that too much of the game would have to be cut, but they were overruled by company management. As a result of the hardware change, several features had to be cut from the game, and some completed work needed to be redone.[24][28] One of the most significant changes was the removal of the option to take multiple routes through the game that led to several possible endings, in contrast to the linear journey in the final product.[7] The plot that remained was different from the original conception, and Tanaka has said that the original story had a much darker tone.[24] Ishii has estimated that up to forty percent of the planned game was dropped to meet the space limitations, and critics have suggested that the hardware change led to technical problems when too much happens at once in the game.[24][30]Secret of Mana was announced as being released in July 1993 as recently as that April, marketed as a "Party Action RPG", before eventually being released in August instead.[31] In 2006, Level magazine claimed that Secret of Mana's rocky development was Square's main inspiration to move their games, such as the Final Fantasy series, from Nintendo consoles to Sony consoles in 1996.[24]

The English translation for Secret of Mana was completed in only 30 days, mere weeks after the Japanese release,[27] and the North American localization was initially advertised as Final Fantasy Adventure 2.[32] Critics have suggested that the translation was done hastily so that the game could be released in North America for the 1993 holiday season.[29] According to translator Ted Woolsey, a large portion of the game's script was cut out in the English localization due to space limitations.[27][33] To display text on the main gameplay screen, the English translation uses a fixed-width font, which limits the amount of space available to display text. Woolsey was unhappy that he had to trim conversations to their bare essentials and that he had so little time for translation, commenting that it "nearly killed me".[34] The script was difficult to translate as it was presented to Woolsey in disordered groups of text, like "shuffling a novel".[33] Other localizations were done in German and French. The Japanese release only named the three protagonists in the manual,[35] while Western versions omitted the characters' names until the enhanced port on the iOS.[36][37]

Music[edit]

Main article: Music of the Mana series

Secret of Manacomposer Hiroki Kikuta

The original score for Secret of Mana was composed and produced by Hiroki Kikuta. Kenji Ito, who had composed the soundtrack for Final Fantasy Adventure, was originally slated for the project, but was replaced with Kikuta after he had started on other projects, such as Romancing SaGa. Secret of Mana was Kikuta's first video game score, and he encountered difficulties in dealing with the hardware limitations of the Super NES. Kikuta tried to express in the music two "contrasting styles" to create an original score which would be neither pop music nor standard game music.[38] Kikuta worked on the music mostly by himself, spending nearly 24 hours a day in his office, alternating between composing and editing to create a soundtrack that would be, according to him, "immersive" and "three-dimensional".[39] Rather than having sound engineers create the samples of instruments like most game music composers of the time, Kikuta made his own samples that matched the hardware capabilities of the Super NES. These custom samples allowed him to know exactly how each piece would sound on the system's hardware, so he did not have to worry about differences between the original composition and the Super NES.[40] Kikuta stated in 2001 that he considered the score for Secret of Mana his favorite creation.[41]

The soundtrack's music includes both "ominous" and "light-hearted" tracks, and is noted for its use of bells and "dark, solemn pianos".[42] Kikuta's compositions for the game were partly inspired by natural landscapes, as well as music from Bali.[43][44] Hardware limitations made the title screen to the game slowly fade in, and Kikuta designed the title track to the game, "Fear of the Heavens", to sync up with the screen. At that time, composers rarely tried to match a game's music to its visuals. Kikuta also started the track off with a "whale noise", rather than a traditional "ping", in order to try to "more deeply connect" the player with the game from the moment it started up. Getting the sound to work with the memory limitations of the Super NES was a difficult technical challenge.[40]

An official soundtrack album, Seiken Densetsu 2 Original Sound Version, was released in Japan in August 1993, containing 44 musical tracks from the game. An English version, identical to the Japanese original aside from its localized packaging and track titles, was later released in North America in December 1994 as Secret of Mana Original Soundtrack, making Secret of Mana one of the first Japanese games to inspire a localized soundtrack release outside of Japan.[42] An album of arranged music from Secret of Mana and its sequel Seiken Densetsu 3 was produced in 1993 as Secret of Mana+. The music in the album was all composed and arranged by Kikuta. Secret of Mana+ contains a single track, titled "Secret of Mana", that incorporates themes from the music of both Secret of Mana and Seiken Densetsu 3, which was still under development at the time.[45] The style of the album has been described by critics as "experimental", using "strange sounds" such as waterfalls, bird calls, cell phone sounds, and "typing" sounds.[46] The music has also been described by critics as covering many different musical styles, such as "Debussian impressionist styles, his own heavy electronic and synth ideas, and even ideas of popular musicians".[45] The latest album of music from the game is a 2012 arranged album titled Secret of Mana Genesis / Seiken Densetsu 2 Arrange Album. The 16 tracks are upgraded versions of the original Super NES tracks, and Kikuta said in the liner notes for the album that they are "how he wanted the music to sound when he wrote it", without the limitations of the Super NES hardware. Critics such as Patrick Gann of RPGFan, however, noted that the differences were minor.[47] Music for the 2018 remake, which features remastered versions of the original soundtrack, was overseen by Kikuta and arranged by numerous game composers, such as Yuzo Koshiro and Tsuyoshi Sekito.[48] The soundtrack was released as an album, also titled Secret of Mana Original Soundtrack, shortly after the remake's release in February 2018.[49]

Re-releases[edit]

In 1999, Square announced they would be porting Secret of Mana to Bandai's handheld system WonderSwan Color as one of nine planned games for the system.[50] No such port was ever released. A mobile phone port of Secret of Mana was released on October 26, 2009.[51] A port of the game for iOS was revealed at E3 2010, and released on Apple's App Store on December 21, 2010.[52] The port fixed several bugs, and the English script was both edited and retranslated from the original Japanese.[53] The enhanced port from the iOS version was released on Android devices in 2014.[54] A port for the Nintendo Switch was released with ports of Final Fantasy Adventure and Seiken Densetsu 3 as part of the Collection of Mana on June 1, 2017, in Japan, and June 11, 2019 in North America.[55][56] The game was released as one of the games included on the Super NES Classic Edition on September 29, 2017.[57] In August 2017, a 3D remake of the game was announced for PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, and Microsoft Windows and was released on February 15, 2018.[58] The remake was developed by Q Studios for Square Enix.[59]

Reception[edit]

Contemporary reception

Sales[edit]

The initial shipment of games in Japan sold out within days of the release date.[69]Dengeki Oh magazine ranked it the second best-selling video game of 1993 in Japan, where 1.003 million units were sold that year, just below Street Fighter II Turbo.[70]

Edge reported in November 1993 that the game was "the most widely covered game of the year in Japan" with a high number of sales, but was initially released in North America "completely un-hyped and mostly unheard of".[61] Despite this, Secret of Mana went on to become the second top-selling Super NES game on the monthly US Babbage's chart in October 1993, below only Mortal Kombat,[71] with Secret of Mana remaining in the US top ten SNES game charts for a year up until October 1994.[72] It was also a success in Europe, where the game introduced many players to console role-playing games.[7] In the United Kingdom, it was the fourth top-selling game in November 1994, and the second top-selling SNES game that month (below Donkey Kong Country).[73]

According to Next Generation magazine, it was surprisingly popular for a role-playing game, contributing to the genre's growing popularity in the West. Next Generation reported in 1996 that the game had sold more than 500,000 copies in the United States alone.[74] According to Square Enix, Secret of Mana had shipped 1.83 million copies worldwide as of 2003, with 1.5 million shipped in Japan and 330,000 abroad.[75]

Contemporary reviews[edit]

Electronic Gaming Monthly magazine's reviewers heavily praised the graphics, music, and multiplayer gameplay, saying that it had "some of the best music I've ever heard from a cartridge". They hoped that other companies would take the game's lead in adding multiplayer modes to role-playing games.[62]Diehard GameFan's review of the game named the multiplayer as the game's best component, with reviewer Kelly Rickards saying that while the graphics were nice, the multiplayer "made the game".[65]GamePro's review praised the graphics, plot, "first-rate gameplay" and "positively massive" world "dwarfing even Zelda", while stating the gameplay and multiplayer were "rough around the edges", concluding it to be "one of the finest action/RPGs" on the SNES.[66]Nintendo Power called it an "enthralling epic", praising the "wide variety of sites and terrain," music, "Beautiful graphics and great depth of play" but criticizing the "unnecessarily long" sword powering-up and "awkward" item selection method.[67]SNES Force magazine praised the game's "superb" graphics, "fantastic" sounds and "revolutionary three-player mode."[76]

Secret of Mana was awarded Game of the Month in December 1993 and Best Role-Playing Game of 1993 by Electronic Gaming Monthly.[62][77] In its annual Megawards, GameFan awarded it Best Action/RPG (SNES).[78]GamePro gave it the award for Role-Playing Game of the Year, ahead of Lufia and Shadowrun as runners-up.[79]

Edge's review said that Secret of Mana was better than contemporary role-playing games Ys I & II, The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, and Landstalker: The Treasures of King Nole. The review stated that Secret of Mana "includes some of the best game design and features ever seen: simultaneous threeplayer action, the best combat system ever designed, the best player interface ever designed, a superb control system, and yes, some of the most engrossing and rewarding gameplay yet". They concluded that the game was one of the best action RPGs or adventure games.[61] Game designer Sandy Petersen reviewed the game in Dragon, and described the game as much like Zelda but with conventional role-playing game features. He predicted that the game would be regarded as a classic. Peterson concluded that Secret of Mana was one of the best SNES role-playing games and that it was "a much larger game than Zelda, with many more types of monsters, character options, and fortresses to explore".[60]Nintendo Magazine System also compared it favorably with A Link to the Past; one reviewer stated that "even the magnificence of Zelda III seems stale in comparison to the incredible features found within this refreshing, exhilarating adventure" while the other stated that it "comes the closest yet" to surpassing Zelda, concluding that Secret of Mana was "one of the greatest graphical RPGs in the history of the world".[68]

Computer and Video Games said in 1994 that Mana was "doing for adventure games now what Zelda did several years ago" and that Mana is "one of the best games for the SNES this year and more playable than" Donkey Kong Country.[73]Next Generation said in 1996 that many players considered it "the RPG equivalent of Lord of the Rings."[74]

Retrospective reception[edit]

Retrospective reception

In 2008, Lucas Thomas of IGN reviewed the Virtual Console port of Secret of Mana and stated that it was considered one of the best video games ever made.[83]Eurogamer's Dan Whitehead also recommended the port, describing it as "essential" and as the formative game of the Mana series.[82] The iOS port of the game was praised by Nadia Oxford of Slide to Play for its improved graphics and computer-controlled characters. She also praised the quality of the touch controls relative to other role-playing game phone versions, though she disliked that the multiplayer mode had been removed.[53]

In 2014, Edge magazine described Secret of Mana as "one of the high points of the 16bit era". A writer for the magazine noted that, 20 years after Secret of Mana's release, its reputation as a SNES action RPG had been surpassed only by that of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past.[30] Review aggregator site GameRankings lists the game as the 13th-highest rated SNES game.[80] In 1996, Super Play ranked Secret of Mana eighth on its list of the best 100 SNES games of all time.[85] It took 42nd place on Nintendo Power magazine's 2006 "Top 200 Nintendo Games of All Time" list, and the magazine called it the 86th best game on a Nintendo system.[86] IGN's "Top 100 Games" list ranked the game at number 48 in 2005,[87] number 49 in 2006,[88] and number 79 in 2007,[89] and their 2017 "Top 100 RPGs" list had it as number 7.[90] In 2006, Famitsu's "All Time Top 100" audience poll ranked it number 97.[91]Secret of Mana was an influential game in its time, and its influence continued into the 2010s. Elements such as its radial ring menu system, described by Edge as "oft-mimicked", were borrowed by later games such as The Temple of Elemental Evil.[30][6] Its cooperative multiplayer gameplay has been mentioned as an influence on Dungeon Siege III.[92]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Japanese: 2, lit. The Legend of the Sacred Sword 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdMusashi (1999-02-22). "RPGFan Reviews - Secret of Mana". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2014-02-19. Retrieved 2021-09-09.
  2. ^ abcdCampbell, Greg. "Secret of Mana - Retroview". RPGamer. Archived from the original on 2014-01-18. Retrieved 2008-12-24.
  3. ^ abc"Secret of Mana". Nintendo Power. No. 54. Nintendo. November 1993. ISSN 1041-9551.
  4. ^ abcThomas, Lucas M. (2008-10-14). "Secret of Mana Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2014-02-23. Retrieved 2008-12-24.
  5. ^Leyland, Robert. "RPGFan Reviews - Secret of Mana". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-11-01. Retrieved 2014-01-16.
  6. ^ abBarton, Matt (2008). Dungeons & Desktops: The History of Computer Role-Playing Games. A K Peters, Ltd. p. 220. ISBN . Archived from the original on 2014-01-30. Retrieved 2010-09-08.
  7. ^ abcdeDay, Ashley (February 2011). "Featured: The Secrets of Mana". Retro Gamer. No. 85. Imagine Publishing. pp. 24–31. ISSN 1742-3155.
  8. ^"Secret of Mana". Nintendo Power. No. 62. Nintendo. July 1994. ISSN 1041-9551.
  9. ^"Secret of Mana". Nintendo Power. No. 64. Nintendo. September 1994. ISSN 1041-9551.
  10. ^Red, Carmine (2011-08-13). "The SNES 20 - Secret of Mana". Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on 2013-12-31. Retrieved 2014-02-04.
  11. ^"VC 聖剣伝説2" (in Japanese). Nintendo. 2008. Archived from the original on 2014-07-12. Retrieved 2014-07-17.
  12. ^ abc"Characters". Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2013-10-30. Retrieved 2014-08-06.
  13. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  14. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  15. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  16. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  17. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  18. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  19. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  20. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  21. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  22. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  23. ^Square (1993-10-03). Secret of Mana (SNES). Square.
  24. ^ abcdefgSchaulfelberger, Frederik (September 2006). "Sanningen om Mana". Level (in Swedish). No. 6. IDG. pp. 114–121.
  25. ^"Chrono Cross Development Team Interview and Contest". GamePro. IDG. 2000-12-01. Archived from the original on 2008-10-16. Retrieved 2010-01-15.
  26. ^"インタビュー『ファイナルファンタジーIII』". Dengeki (in Japanese). 2006. Archived from the original on 2019-03-04. Retrieved 2019-06-18.
  27. ^ abcWest, Neil (September 1994). "Interview with Ted Woolsey". Super Play. Future plc. ISSN 0966-6192. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. Retrieved 2007-09-12.
  28. ^ abFinnegan, Lizzy (2015-04-07). "Secret of Mana: A Good Game With The Great Cut Out". The Escapist. Archived from the original on 2015-10-04. Retrieved 2015-11-09.
  29. ^ abParish, Jeremy; Cifaldi, Frank; Gifford, Kevin (December 2003). "Classics Column #1: Desperately Seeking Seiken". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2013-06-02. Retrieved 2014-01-21.
  30. ^ abc"Retrospective: Secret Of Mana". Edge. Future plc. 2014-06-01. Archived from the original on 2014-07-15. Retrieved 2014-08-20.
  31. ^ [Party Action RPG: Seiken Densetsu 2]. Famicom Tsūshin (in Japanese). No. 226. 1993-04-16. p. 6.
  32. ^"Final Fantasy Adventure 2". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 45. Ziff Davis. April 1993. p. 90.
  33. ^ abMcGrath, Brendan (1999-04-29). "Interview with Ted Woolsey". Square Haven. Archived from the original on 2012-02-17. Retrieved 2007-09-12.
  34. ^Szczepaniak, John (2009-08-31). "Localization: Confessions By Industry Legends". Hardcore Gaming 101. Archived from the original on 2014-01-02. Retrieved 2014-01-21.
  35. ^"キャラクター紹介". 聖剣伝説2 取扱説明書 (in Japanese). Square. 1993-08-06. pp. 28–31.
  36. ^"The Heroes". Secret of Mana Instruction Booklet. Square. 1993-10-03. p. 35.
  37. ^"Characters". Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2013-10-30. Retrieved 2011-01-03.
  38. ^Kikuta, Hiroki (1995-08-25). Seiken Densetsu 2 Original Sound Version (liner notes) (in Japanese). NTT Publishing. PSCN-5030.
  39. ^Jeriaska; Yamamoto, Taka (2007-06-09). "Where Angels Fear to Tread: A Conversation with Hiroki Kikuta". Square Haven. Archived from the original on 2014-01-17. Retrieved 2007-06-15.
  40. ^ abJeriaska (2009-08-31). "Interview: Magical Planet - The Music of Hiroki Kikuta & Yoko Shimomura". Gamasutra. UBM plc. Archived from the original on 2013-10-29. Retrieved 2009-09-01.
  41. ^RocketBaby staff (2001). "Interview with Hiroki Kikuta". Hollow Light Media. Archived from the original on 2013-11-04. Retrieved 2007-06-15.
  42. ^ abThomas, Damian (2001-03-23). "Original music from the video game Secret of Mana". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2014-01-17. Retrieved 2009-08-28.
  43. ^Kalabakov, Daniel (2003-01-06). "Interview with Hiroki Kikuta". Spelmusik.net. Archived from the original on 2007-08-15. Retrieved 2007-06-15.
  44. ^Parish, Jeremy (2010-12-27). "A Conversation With Secret of Mana's Composer". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2012-07-08. Retrieved 2011-11-10.
  45. ^ abGreening, Chris. "Secret of Mana + :: Review by Chris". Square Enix Music Online. Archived from the original on 2014-01-17. Retrieved 2009-08-28.
  46. ^Kalabakov, Daniel (2002-05-19). "Secret of Mana +". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2014-01-17. Retrieved 2009-08-10.
  47. ^Gann, Patrick (2012-09-20). "Secret of Mana Genesis / Seiken Densetsu 2 Arrange Album". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2014-02-01. Retrieved 2014-01-23.
  48. ^Gallagher, Mathew (19 November 2017). "Team of arrangers announced for Secret of Mana remake". Video Game Music Online. Archived from the original on 23 November 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  49. ^Wilkes, Brenna (2018-02-22). "Secret of Mana Remake Original Soundtrack Released by Square-Enix". Original Sound Version. Archived from the original on 2018-02-22. Retrieved 2018-02-22.
  50. ^Sato, Yukiyoshi Ike (December 1999). "Square Wonderswan games update". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 2014-03-04. Retrieved 2014-01-21.
  51. ^ (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2013-10-04. Retrieved 2014-01-21.
  52. ^McElroy, Griffin (2010-12-20). "Secret of Mana Greenlit; should hit App Store Tonight". Joystiq. AOL. Archived from the original on 2013-10-16. Retrieved 2010-12-21.
  53. ^ abcOxford, Nadia (2010-12-27). "Secret of Mana Review". Slide to Play. Archived from the original on 2014-02-02. Retrieved 2012-02-08.
  54. ^Morris, Tatiana (2014-10-30). "Secret of Mana hits the Android on the Google Play Store". GameZone. Archived from the original on 2014-12-31. Retrieved 2014-12-30.
  55. ^Barder, Ollie (2017-06-01). "The Switch Gets A New 'Secret Of Mana' Game Collection But Only In Japan". Forbes. Archived from the original on 2017-07-01. Retrieved 2017-07-27.
  56. ^Schrier, Jason (2019-06-11). "Collection Of Mana Comes To Switch, Including An English Seiken Densetsu 3, And It's Out Today". Kotaku. Univision Communications. Archived from the original on 2019-06-11. Retrieved 2019-06-11.
  57. ^"Super NES Classic Edition". Nintendo. 2017-09-29. Archived from the original on 2017-09-28. Retrieved 2017-09-29.
  58. ^Frank, Allegra (2017-08-25). "Secret of Mana remake hits PS4, Vita and PC next year". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on 2018-09-03. Retrieved 2017-08-25.
  59. ^"Q Studios - Products". Q Studios. Archived from the original on 2020-03-21. Retrieved 2020-03-21.
  60. ^ abPetersen, Sandy (August 1994). "Eye of the Monitor". Dragon. No. 208. TSR. pp. 61–66. ISSN 0279-6848.
  61. ^ abc"Secret of Mana Review". Edge. No. 4. Future plc. January 1994. pp. 64–65. ISSN 1350-1593. Archived from the original on 2014-02-02. Retrieved 2012-08-10.
  62. ^ abcSemrad, Ed; Carpenter, Danyon; Manuel, Al; Sushi-X (December 1993). "Game of the Month: Secret of Mana". Electronic Gaming Monthly. No. 53. Ziff Davis. p. 40. ISSN 1058-918X. Archived from the original on 2004-05-31. Retrieved 2010-02-09.
  63. ^. Weekly Famitsu (in Japanese). No. 900. Enterbrain. 2006-03-03. p. 4.
  64. ^"Legacy Review Archives". Game Informer. Retrieved 3 October 2021.
  65. ^ abHalverson, Dave; Sgt. Gamer; Rickards, Kelly; Cockburn, Andrew (November 1993). "Planet SNES - Secret of Mana". Diehard GameFan. Vol. 1 no. 12. DieHard Gamers Club. pp. 22 & 78–80. ISSN 1092-7212.
  66. ^ abHaul, Monty (December 1993). "Secret of Mana". GamePro. No. 53. IDG. pp. 256–260. ISSN 1042-8658.
  67. ^ ab"Secret of Mana". Nintendo Power. No. 54. Nintendo. November 1993. pp. 8–17, 105, 107. ISSN 1041-9551.
  68. ^ ab"Secret of Mana". Nintendo Magazine System. EMAP. 1994. pp. 46–48. ISSN 1750-9998. Archived from the original on 2017-06-17. Retrieved 2017-02-22.
  69. ^Jarrat, Steve (December 1993). "Prescreen: Secret of Mana". Edge. No. 3. Future plc. pp. 22–23. ISSN 1350-1593.
  70. ^"1993年のコンシューマーゲームソフトの売上Top30" [1993 Consumer Game Software Sales: Top 30]. Dengeki Oh (in Japanese). MediaWorks. Archived from the original on 19 September 2001. Retrieved 16 September 2021.
  71. ^"Top Video Games". Electronic Games. Reese Publishing Company. January 1994. p. 16. ISSN 0730-6687. Archived from the original on 2015-11-06. Retrieved 2014-12-31.
  72. ^"EGM's Hot Top Tens"(PDF). Electronic Gaming Monthly. December 1994. p. 52.
  73. ^ ab"Chart attack with HMV"(PDF). Computer and Video Games. No. 158 (January 1995). Future plc. 15 December 1994. p. 115.
  74. ^ ab"Secret of Mana 2". Next Generation. No. 14. Imagine Media. February 1996. pp. 120–1. ISSN 1078-9693.
  75. ^"February 2, 2004 - February 4, 2004"(PDF). Square Enix. 2004-02-09. p. 27. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2013-11-09. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  76. ^"The Secret of Mana". SNES Force. No. 8. January 1994. p. 7.
  77. ^"Electronic Gaming Monthly's Buyer's Guide". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Ziff Davis. January 1994. ISSN 1058-918X.
  78. ^"Megawards". Diehard GameFan. Vol. 2 no. 2. DieHard Gamers Club. January 1994. pp. 54–58. ISSN 1092-7212.
  79. ^"Editors' Choice Awards". GamePro. No. 55. IDG. February 1994. pp. 22–27. ISSN 1042-8658.
  80. ^ ab"Secret of Mana for Super Nintendo". GameRankings. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on 2014-02-02. Retrieved 2012-02-08.
  81. ^"Secret of Mana for iPhone/iPad Reviews". Metacritic. Red Ventures. Archived from the original on 2015-01-15. Retrieved 2014-10-22.
  82. ^ abWhitehead, Dan (2009-01-18). "Virtual Console Roundup Review". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on 2014-02-01. Retrieved 2011-10-11.
  83. ^ abThomas, Lucas M. (2008-10-13). "Secret of Mana Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2014-02-23. Retrieved 2008-11-23.
  84. ^"Secret Of Mana Review". Official Nintendo Magazine. Nintendo. 2008-12-26. Archived from the original on 2012-10-19. Retrieved 2014-12-13.
  85. ^"The Super Play All-time top 100 SNES games". Super Play. No. 42. Future plc. April 1996. p. 39. ISSN 0966-6192.
  86. ^"NP Top 200". Nintendo Power. No. 200. Nintendo. February 2006. pp. 58–66. ISSN 1041-9551.
  87. ^"IGN's Top 100 Games". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2013-11-02. Retrieved 2006-05-08.
  88. ^"IGN's Top 100 Games". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2013-11-02. Retrieved 2007-09-12.
  89. ^"IGN's Top 100 Games". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2013-11-02. Retrieved 2008-11-23.
  90. ^"Top 100 RPGs of All Time". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on 2017-05-07. Retrieved 2017-05-07.
  91. ^"Japan Votes on All Time Top 100". Edge. Future. 2006-03-03. Archived from the original on 2008-07-23. Retrieved 2008-11-24.
  92. ^MacKenzie, Gavin (2012-12-14). "Dungeon Siege III Developer Interview". NowGamer. Imagine Publishing. Archived from the original on 2011-01-02. Retrieved 2014-08-22.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secret_of_Mana

Mana collection wikipedia of

Collection of Mana

Available now

The long-awaited "Trials of Mana" is now available outside of Japan! Play all three games in the original Mana series!

Quintessential JRPG series "Collection of Mana" is now on Nintendo Switch! Fall in love with the Mana series all over again, including the first-ever release of the action-packed third game in the trilogy: "Trials of Mana"!

Notice:
Final Fantasy Adventure/Mystic Quest and Secret of Mana are playable in English, French and German.
Trials of Mana is playable in English, French, German and Spanish.

Multiplayer available for "Secret of Mana" (1-3 players) and "Trials of Mana" (1-2 players).

Release date:
June 11, 2019

Players:
up to 3 players

Genre:
Role-Playing, Action, Adventure, Other

Publisher:
SQUARE ENIX

Game file size:
356 MB

Supported Languages:
French, German, Spanish, English

Supported Play Modes:
TV mode

TV mode

Tabletop mode

Tabletop mode

Handheld mode

Handheld mode

Software compatibility and play experience may differ on Nintendo Switch Lite. Additional accessories may be required (sold separately). See support for details.

ESRB Rating:

Nintendo Switch Online

Play online, access classic Super NES™ games, and more with a Nintendo Switch Online membership.

*MSRP: Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary. See retailer for details.

A Nintendo Switch Online membership (sold separately) is required for Save Data Cloud backup.

© 1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, 2019 SQUARE ENIX CO., LTD. All Rights Reserved.

Sours: https://www.nintendo.com/games/detail/collection-of-mana-switch/
Maná - Sergio Vallin tutorial para tocar “reloj cucú”.

Mana (series)

Video game series

"Seiken Densetsu" redirects here. For the first game in the series known as Seiken Densetsu in Japan, see Final Fantasy Adventure.

Video game series

Mana
Mana Tree.jpg

Artwork of the Mana Tree, from Children of Mana

Genre(s)
Developer(s)Square
Square Enix
Brownie Brown (2003–2007)
Publisher(s)Square
Square Enix
Creator(s)Koichi Ishii
Artist(s)
  • Shinichi Kameoka
  • Nao Ikeda
  • Hirō Isono
Composer(s)
Platform(s)Game Boy, Game Boy Advance, Nintendo DS, PlayStation, PlayStation 2, PlayStation 3 (As PSOne Classic), PlayStation 4PlayStation Vita, Super NES, iOS, Android, Nintendo Switch
First releaseFinal Fantasy Adventure
June 28, 1991
Latest releaseTrials of Mana (remake)
April 24, 2020

The Mana series, known in Japan as Seiken Densetsu (聖剣伝説, lit. The Legend of the Sacred Sword), is a high fantasyaction role-playing game series created by Koichi Ishii, with development formerly from Square, and is currently owned by Square Enix. The series began as a handheld side story to Square's flagship franchise Final Fantasy. The Final Fantasy elements were subsequently dropped starting with the second installment, Secret of Mana, in order to become its own series. It has grown to include games of various genres within the fictional world of Mana, with recurring stories involving a world tree, its associated holy sword, and the fight against forces that would steal their power. Several character designs, creatures, and musical themes reappear frequently.

Four games were released in the series between 1991 and 1999: the original Seiken Densetsu (1991)—Final Fantasy Adventure in North America and Mystic Quest in Europe—for the Game Boy, Secret of Mana (1993) for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System, Trials of Mana (1995) for the Super Famicom, and Legend of Mana for the PlayStation. A remake of the original game, Sword of Mana (2003), was published for the Game Boy Advance. All of the original games were action role-playing games, though they included a wide variety of gameplay mechanics, and the stories of the games were connected only thematically.

In 2006 and 2007, four more games were released as part of the World of Mana subseries, an attempt by Square Enix to release games in a series over a variety of genres and consoles. These were Children of Mana (2006), an action-oriented dungeon crawler game for the Nintendo DS; Dawn of Mana (2006), a 3D action-adventure game for the PlayStation 2; Friends of Mana (2006), a Japan-only multiplayer role-playing game for mobile phones; and Heroes of Mana (2007), a real-time strategy game for the DS. Children was developed by Nex Entertainment and Heroes by Brownie Brown, founded by several developers of Legend, though Ishii oversaw development of all four games. Three more games have been released since the World of Mana subseries ended: Circle of Mana (2013), a Japan-only card battle game for the GREE mobile platform, Rise of Mana (2014), a Japan-only free-to-play action role-playing game for iOS, Android, and PlayStation Vita, and Adventures of Mana (2016), a 3D remake of Final Fantasy Adventure for the PlayStation Vita, iOS, and Android. In addition to the games, four manga series and one novelization have been released in the Mana franchise.

The Mana series reception has been very uneven, with early games rated higher by critics than more recent titles. Secret of Mana has been regarded as one of the best 2D action role-playing games ever made, and their music has inspired several orchestral concerts, while the games from the World of Mana series have been rated considerably lower. By 2011, the series had sold over six million copies.

Development[edit]

History[edit]

Square trademarked Seiken Densetsu in 1989,[1] intending to use it for a game project subtitled The Emergence of Excalibur, and led by Kazuhiko Aoki for the Famicom Disk System. According to early advertisements, the game would consist of an unprecedented five floppy disks, making it one of the largest titles developed for the Famicom up until that point. Although Square solicited pre-orders for the game, Kaoru Moriyama, a former Square employee, affirms that management canceled the ambitious project before it advanced beyond the early planning stages. In October 1987, customers who had placed orders were sent a letter informing them of the cancellation and had their purchases refunded. The letter also suggested to consider placing an order on another upcoming Square role-playing game in a similar vein: Final Fantasy.[2]

In 1991, Square reused the Seiken Densetsu trademark for an unrelated Game Boyaction role-playing game directed by Koichi Ishii. Originally developed under the title Gemma Knights, the game was renamed Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden (published in North America as Final Fantasy Adventure and in Europe as Mystic Quest).[2]

Beginning with the 1993 sequel, Secret of Mana, Seiken Densetsu was subsequently "spun off" into its own series of action role-playing games distinct from Final Fantasy, named the Mana series outside Japan. Four titles in the series were released between 1993 and 2003.[3]Secret of Mana was originally intended to be a launch title for the Super NES CD-ROM Adapter, but when the add-on was cancelled it was cut down into a standard Super NES cartridge, with many of the cut ideas appearing in other Square titles.[4] Hirō Isono provided artwork for the game including forest landscapes.[5] It was followed in 1995 by the then Japan-only Trials of Mana (Seiken Densetsu 3 in Japan); the game was originally planned to be released in English as Secret of Mana 2, but technical issues and localization costs prohibited the release.[6][7] The final new game in the series' initial run is the 1999 Legend of Mana, developed for the PlayStation. Legend is a 2D game like its predecessors, despite the PlayStation's 3D focus, because the console could not handle the full 3D world Ishii envisioned where one could interact with natural shaped objects.[8] 2003 saw the release of Sword of Mana, a remake of the original Seiken Densetsu for the Game Boy Advance. The remake was outsourced to Brownie Brown, which was composed of many of the Square employees who had worked on Legend.[7]

In 2003, Square, now Square Enix, began a drive to begin developing "polymorphic content", a marketing and sales strategy to "[provide] well-known properties on several platforms, allowing exposure of the products to as wide an audience as possible".[9] The first of these was the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, and Square Enix intended to have campaigns for other series whereby multiple games in different genres would be developed simultaneously. Although no such project for the Mana series had been announced by this point, it was announced in late 2004 that an unnamed Mana game was in development for the upcoming Nintendo DS platform.[10] In early 2005, Square Enix announced a World of Mana project, the application of this "polymorphic content" idea to the Mana franchise, which would include several games across different genres and platforms. These games, as with the rest of the series, would not be direct sequels or prequels to one another, even if appearing so at first glance, but would instead share thematic connections.[7] The first release in this project and the sixth release in the Mana series was announced in September 2005 as Children of Mana for the DS.[11] Four games were released in 2006 and 2007 in the World of Mana subseries: Children of Mana, Dawn of Mana, and Friends of Mana in 2006, and Heroes of Mana in 2007.[7]

Each game in the World of Mana series was different, both from each other and from the previous games in the series. Children is an action-oriented dungeon crawler game for the DS, developed by Nex Entertainment; Dawn is a 3D action-adventure game for the PlayStation 2; Friends is a Japan-only multiplayer role-playing game for mobile phones; and Heroes is a real-time strategy game for the DS, developed by Brownie Brown. While Ishii was the designer for all four games, he served as the director and producer for Dawn, which was considered the main game of the four and was released as Seiken Densetsu 4 in Japan.[7] The theme of the subseries for Ishii, especially Dawn, was about exploring how to add "the feeling of touch" to a game. He had held off on designing new Mana games after Legend was unable to meet his desires, until he felt that technology had improved enough to let him create what he envisioned.[8] A fifth game for the subseries was considered for the Wii in 2006, but did not enter development.[12] In April 2007, a month after the release of the final game of the World of Mana, Ishii left Square Enix to lead his own development company, named Grezzo.[13][14]

The Mana series is put on hiatus until 2013, when Square Enix released Circle of Mana, a Japan-only card battle game for the GREE mobile platform.[15] It was followed in 2014 by Rise of Mana, a Japan-only free-to-play action role-playing game for iOS, Android, and PlayStation Vita,[16] and in 2016 by Adventures of Mana, a 3D remake of Final Fantasy Adventure for the PlayStation Vita, iOS, and Android.[17] On August 25, 2017, a 3D remake of Secret of Mana was announced for PlayStation 4, PlayStation Vita, and Microsoft Windows, for release on February 15, 2018.[18] The original staff was not involved in any recent game's development because many had already left Square Enix.

During the series' 30th anniversary stream were announced a new mobile spin-off game, Echoes of Mana, and new game of the series for consoles, which will see the return of series creator Ishii to the series. [19]

Creation and design[edit]

The Mana series is the result of Koichi Ishii's desire to create a fictional world. In Ishii's opinion, Mana is not a series of video games, but rather a world which is illustrated by and can be explored through video games.[20] When working on the series, Koichi Ishii draws inspiration from abstract images from his memories of childhood, as well as movies and fantasy books that captivated him as a child. Ishii takes care to avoid set conventions, and his influences are correspondingly very wide and non-specific. Nonetheless, among his literary influences, he acknowledges Tove Jansson's Moomin, Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings.[12]

While some titles of the World of Mana series do share direct connections with other installments, the games of the series have few concrete links.[21] There is no overall explicit in-game chronological order. Further, according to Koichi Ishii in 2006 the games do not take place in exactly the same world, and characters or elements who appear in different titles are best considered alternate versions of each other. Instead, the connections between each title are more abstract than story-based, linked only on the karmic level.[12] Complicating this assertion, Ishii has also said in an interview that Children is set ten years after Dawn, while Heroes is set one generation prior to Trials of Mana.[7][22]

Games[edit]

Main series[edit]

Spin-offs[edit]

Remakes[edit]

Common elements[edit]

A common element of the series is its seamless, real-time battle system. The system was developed by Koichi Ishii and improved upon by Hiromichi Tanaka, out of a desire to create a system different from the one featured in the first few Final Fantasy titles.[45] While action-based, the Mana battle system is intended to be playable even by newcomers as well as veterans.[46] The system is coupled with the distinctive hierarchical "Ring Command" menu system, featured prominently in Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana, and to a lesser extent in later installments. Each ring is a set of icons with a textual infobox explanation which, upon selection, allow the player to use an item, cast a spell, look up in-game statistics, or change the game's settings. Navigation within a menu is achieved by rotating the ring through the cursor left or right, while switching to a different menu is achieved by pressing the up or down buttons.[27][47] Although not part of the series, the spin-off Secret of Evermore, developed by the North American Square Soft, was also built upon the "Ring Command" system.[48]

The Mana series features several recurring characters and beings, including the Final Fantasy creatures Chocobos in Final Fantasy Adventure and Legend of Mana,[26][49] and Moogles in Secret of Mana and as a status ailment in Trials of Mana and Sword of Mana.[50][51][52] Watts is a dwarfblacksmith wearing a horned helmet who upgrades the player's weaponry.[53] Usually, an anthropomorphic cat merchant is found outside of town areas and allows a player to save the game and buy supplies at high prices. This role is played by Neko in Secret of Mana, and Niccolo in Legend of Mana and Sword of Mana.[54][55][56] In the Japanese games these merchants share the name Nikita.

The Mana Tree and the Mana Sword, called Excalibur in Final Fantasy Adventure's English version, are recurring plot devices which have been featured in every game of the series. The mystical Mana Tree is a source of magic which sustains the balance and nature of the series' world.[57] The Mana Sword is typically used to restore this balance when it becomes lost in the games.[58]Final Fantasy Adventure explains that if the Mana Tree dies, a member of the Mana Family will become the "seed" of a new Tree. A sprout of the Mana Tree is called a Gemma, while protectors of the Tree, who wield the Mana Sword, are called Gemma Knights.[59][60] In Trials of Mana, a Goddess is said to have turned into the Mana Tree after creating the world with the Mana Sword.[61][62] The Mana Tree is destroyed near the game ending in Final Fantasy Adventure and Secret of Mana, but a character becomes the new Mana Tree in the former game.[59][63]

Elemental Spirits, also called Mana Spirits, are beings who govern the magic elements of the series' world, and are at the core of the games' magic system as they are used to cast magic spells.[64] Eight types of spirits have appeared in the series since Secret of Mana, and each embodies a different element. Their names are homonyms of mythological beings or phenomena.[65] In Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana, usage of their power is enabled upon the main characters' meeting with them.[65][66] In Legend of Mana, the spirits serve as factors in the Land Creation System.[67] In Legend of Mana and Sword of Mana, multiple spirits of the same elemental type appear.[67][68] In terms of storyline, in Trials of Mana and Heroes of Mana, the spirits are charged to protect the Mana Stones in which the Mana Goddess sealed eight elemental benevodons (God-Beasts in the fan-translation of SD3).[61][69][70] In Dawn of Mana's North American version, each spirit speaks with a particular European accent, such as French or Scottish.[32]

Rabites, known as Rabi (ラビ) in the Japanese versions of the games, are cute, fictional, rabbit-like creatures appearing as a common enemy in the series since its beginning. The Rabite has become a sort of mascot for the Mana series, much the same way as the Chocobo represents Final Fantasy, and is one of its most recognizable icons.[71] The Rabite resembles a bodiless, one-toothed rabbit with large ears that curve upward and form a point at the tip, and a round, puffy pink tail that moves by hopping along the ground. It is most commonly yellow colored, but also pink, lilac, black, and white, and are variously minor enemies, "superboss" characters and even friendly units and pets.[72][73][74][75][76][77] Rabites are also mentioned in Final Fantasy X-2 with an accessory comically named "Rabite's Foot", which increases a character's luck statistics. Additionally, they appear in Final Fantasy Tactics Advance in the description of one of the game's optional missions as an endangered species due to being poached for good luck charms.[78] Rabites have appeared prevalently in several pieces of Mana merchandise, including plush dolls, cushions, lighters, mousepads, straps, telephone cards, and T-shirts.[79]

Flammie, sometimes spelled Flammy, is the name of a fictional species of flying dragons, as well as the proper name of some its members, featured in several games of the series. A Flammie's appearance is a mixture of draconian, mammalian, and reptilian features, and its coloring has varied throughout the series. Flammies typically serve as a means of transportation in the game by allowing a player's characters to ride on a Flammie's back to different locations in the game's world. In Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana, the Super NES's Mode 7 graphic capabilities allows the player to control a Flammie from either a "behind the back" third-person or top-down perspective, and fly over the landscape as it scrolls beneath them.[80][81] In terms of story, the Flammies were created by the Moon Gods, and are part of an endless cycle of destruction and rebirth as the stronger versions of Flammies—becoming part of a category of creature known as Mana Beasts (Benevodons in Trials of Mana), or God Beasts (神獣, Shinjū) in Japanese—destroy the world and the Mana Sword and Tree restore the world.[82][83][84]

Music[edit]

Main article: Music of the Mana series

The Mana series has had several different composers. Final Fantasy Adventure was composed by Kenji Ito; it was his second original score.[85] Ito's music is mainly inspired by images from the game rather than outside influences.[86] The scores for Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana were both composed by Hiroki Kikuta. Despite difficulties in dealing with the hardware limitations, Kikuta tried to express, in the music of Secret of Mana, two "contrasting styles", namely himself and the game. This was to create an original score which would be neither pop music nor standard game music.[87] Kikuta worked on the music for the two games mostly by himself, spending nearly 24 hours a day in his office, alternating between composing and editing to create an immersive three-dimensional sound.[88] Kikuta considers the score for Secret of Mana his favorite creation.[89] His compositions for Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana were partly inspired by natural landscapes.[90] In 1995, Kikuta released an experimental album of arranged music from the two installments, titled Secret of Mana +, which features one 50-minute-long track.[91]

Legend of Mana's score was composed by Yoko Shimomura, and of all her compositions, she considers it the one that best expresses herself.[92] Kenji Ito returned to the series with Sword of Mana. He also composed roughly one third of the Children of Mana soundtrack, while the rest was composed by Masaharu Iwata and Takayuki Aihara. Ito was the main composer for Dawn of Mana, assisted by Tsuyoshi Sekito, Masayoshi Soken, and Junya Nakano, as well as main theme composer Ryuichi Sakamoto.[85] In North America, purchasers of Dawn of Mana from participating retailers were offered a sampler disc, titled Breath of Mana, which features a selection of tracks from the game.[93] Shimomura has returned to the series with Heroes of Mana, while also contributing one song to Rise of Mana.[94]

Printed adaptations[edit]

A five-volume manga based on Legend of Mana was drawn by Shiro Amano and published in Japan by Enterbrain between 2000 and 2002.[96][97][98][99][100] It features a comedic story about the game's main character, here named Toto. A German version was published by Egmont Manga & Anime in 2003.[101] A collection of four-panel comic strips, drawn by various authors and titled Sword of Mana Yonkoma Manga Theatre, was published in Japan by Square Enix on January 16, 2004. It included a questionnaire that, if sent back, allowed participants to win illustrations signed by Koichi Ishii and Shinichi Kameoka, as well as special T-shirts.[102] Enterbrain also published a Sword of Mana manga adaptation in Japan on February 25, 2004, drawn by a collaboration of authors led by Shiro Amano.[103] Two days later, Square Enix published a two-volume novelization of Sword of Mana in Japan written by Matsui Oohama.[102] An original manga, named Seiken Densetsu: Princess of Mana, was drawn by Satsuki Yoshino and published in the Japanese magazine Gangan Powered on February 22, 2007.[104][105]

Reception[edit]

The Mana series has been mostly well received, though each title has seen varied levels of success. RPGFan called Final Fantasy Adventure one of the best things to happen to the Game Boy,[121] while IGN considered it the best action RPG on the console after The Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening.[23]GameSpot referred to Secret of Mana as "one of Square's masterpieces on the SNES".[122] The game has appeared on several list of top games, including ranked number 97 on Famitsu's top 100 games of all time.[123][124][125][126]Trials of Mana was called "easily one of the best RPGs to come out of the 16-bit era" by Nintendo Life.[127]Famitsu rated Legend of Mana at 31/40 and Heroes of Mana at 32/40.[128][129] The NPD Group ranked Legend of Mana as the top seller the week of its release, and in 2006 was re-released as part of the Ultimate Hits series.[130][131]

Many of the World of Mana titles have not been as critically successful as the original five games in the series, and though the franchise has been praised for their attempts at trying new ways of experiencing the games' fictional world, there have been various gameplay design flaws that have hindered the later games.[132][133]1UP.com commented that despite the game's excellent presentation and storytelling, Dawn of Mana did not match the level of gameplay of the early Mana games.[134] Prior to the World of Mana games, RPGamer called the series a "treasured favorite".[135] After the release of Heroes of Mana, they commented that the World of Mana series is "cursed", and the future of the series looked "bleak".[136]

The music of the Mana series, especially Secret of Mana, has received wide acclaim and fan enthusiasm.[88][137] The Secret of Mana soundtrack was one of the first official soundtracks of video games music released in the United States and thus before fully mainstream interest in RPGs.[138] The Secret of Mana's opening theme, "Angel's Fear", was rated at number 7 on IGN's Top Ten RPG Title tracks, calling it a "magical title song that captures our hearts".[137] It was also featured in the third Orchestral Game Concert.[139]Secret of Mana is also the number 6 most remixed soundtrack on the popular video game music site OverClocked ReMix, with Trials of Mana tied at 18.[140] The music of the other titles have also been well received. RPGFan called the music to Final Fantasy Adventure "addictive", despite its low, MIDI-like quality.[121] GameSpy called Children of Mana's music some of the best Nintendo DS music yet and referred to it as "beautiful".[141]Game Informer complimented Dawn of Mana's music, calling it good.[142] IGN referred to Legend of Mana's music as "beautiful" and stated the background music brought "intensity", "suspense", and "subtle nuance" to the game.[35] Other reviewers echoed similar praise to GameSpot, calling the music "excellently orchestrated" and RPGFan calling it one of the game's good points.[34][143]

The Mana series has sold well overall, and as of March 2011, series titles have sold over 6 million units.[144] The original Seiken Densetsu sold over 700,000 units,[145] and its remake Sword of Mana sold over 277,000 copies in Japan.[146]Secret of Mana has shipped over 1.83 million copies worldwide.[147]Legend of Mana sold over 400,000 units in its first week alone as the highest-selling release that week in Japan,[148] and over 700,000 copies in Japan by the end of the year.[149][150]Children of Mana sold over 281,000 copies in Japan,[151] and Dawn of Mana sold over 410,000 copies worldwide.[152][153]Heroes of Mana sold over 178,000 copies worldwide.[154][155] The PlayStation Vita version of Rise of Mana downloaded over 100,000 times.[156]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"第2132844号". 商標出願・登録情報. Industrial Property Digital Library (via WebCite). April 28, 1989. Archived from the original on August 16, 2010. Retrieved August 16, 2010.
  2. ^ abCollette, Chris (November 15, 2003). "Elusions: Final Fantasy IV / Seiken Densetsu". Lost Levels. Archived from the original on June 14, 2007. Retrieved June 9, 2007.
  3. ^Basire, Casey (July 14, 2007). "The World of Mana series is returning, real-time strategy style". Nintendo World Report. Archived from the original on August 13, 2011. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
  4. ^Parish, Jeremy; Cifaldi, Frank; Gifford, Kevin (December 2003). "Classics Column #1: Desperately Seeking Seiken". 1UP.com. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on June 2, 2013. Retrieved January 21, 2014.
  5. ^"Hirō Isono". Arthur. Retrieved June 26, 2021.
  6. ^West, Neil (September 1994). "Interview with Ted Woolsey". Super Play. Future plc. ISSN 0966-6192. Archived from the original on April 30, 2013.
  7. ^ abcdefDay, Ashley (February 2011). "Featured: The Secrets of Mana". Retro Gamer. Imagine Publishing (85): 24–31. ISSN 1742-3155.
  8. ^ abGantayat, Anoop (October 6, 2006). "HAVOK For Mana". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on July 20, 2015. Retrieved April 7, 2013.
  9. ^Kohler, Chris (September 24, 2004). "More Compilation of Final Fantasy VII details". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 16, 2014. Retrieved August 10, 2006.
  10. ^Harris, Craig (August 10, 2004). "Nintendo DS Line-up, Part Two". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  11. ^Gantayat, Anoop (September 28, 2005). "Mana At Last". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on December 16, 2014. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  12. ^ abcdeRPGamer staff (October 6, 2006). "Children of Mana Interview". RPGamer. Archived from the original on December 8, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2007.
  13. ^Riley, Adam (January 15, 2009). "FF: Legend II Remade for Nintendo DS". Cubed³. Archived from the original on March 8, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2009.
  14. ^"Message from CEO" (in Japanese). Grezzo. January 15, 2009. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  15. ^ abcdSpencer (March 5, 2013). "Circle Of Mana Is Live, Has Lost Secret Of Mana Game's Class Change System". Siliconera. Archived from the original on July 21, 2013. Retrieved March 29, 2013.
  16. ^ abNAKAMURA, TOSHI (March 3, 2014). "Here's What the New Mana Game is About". Kotaku. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved March 3, 2014.
  17. ^ abSato (February 1, 2016). "Adventures of Mana Is Now Available, Producer Shares A Message For Fans". Siliconera. Archived from the original on February 5, 2016. Retrieved February 4, 2016.
  18. ^Frank, Allegra (August 25, 2017). "Secret of Mana remake hits PS4, Vita and PC next year". Polygon. Vox Media. Retrieved August 25, 2017.
  19. ^Rafael Antonio, Pineda (June 28, 2021). "Mana Series Creator Koichi Ishii: New Mana Console Game in Development". Aniem News Network. Retrieved June 30, 2021.
  20. ^ abMorcos, Antoine (December 15, 2006). "Interview Children of Mana" (in French). JeuxFrance.com. Archived from the original on October 4, 2011. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  21. ^ abParish, Jeremy (April 5, 2007). "Heroes of Mana Preview". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  22. ^Bramwell, Tom (May 16, 2006). "Mana a Mana". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on December 30, 2013. Retrieved December 15, 2014.
  23. ^ abSy, Dexter (June 9, 2000). "Final Fantasy Adventure Review". IGN. Archived from the original on October 18, 2012. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  24. ^Spencer (February 13, 2007). "Manavolution: the original Seiken Densetsu characters over time". Siliconera. Archived from the original on November 1, 2007. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  25. ^ abc"Collection of Mana". Square Enix. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  26. ^ abParish, Jeremy; Cifaldi, Frank; Gifford, Kevin (December 2003). "Classics Column #1: Desperately Seeking Seiken". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on June 2, 2013. Retrieved June 9, 2007.
  27. ^ ab"Ring Commands". Secret of Mana Instruction Booklet. Square Soft. October 3, 1993. pp. 13–14. SNS-K2-USA.
  28. ^IGN Staff (April 30, 2003). "IGN's Top 100 Games of All Time". IGN. Archived from the original on September 10, 2009. Retrieved June 17, 2016.
  29. ^"Reviews: Seiken Densetsu 3". 1UP.com. May 9, 2004. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  30. ^Romano, Sal (June 11, 2019). "Seiken Densetsu 3 remake Trials of Mana announced for PS4, Switch, and PC". Gematsu. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  31. ^Litowski, Theo (October 19, 2005). "Seiken Densetsu 4 Gets Physical". RPGamer. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved September 27, 2006.
  32. ^ abRubinshteyn, Dennis (May 18, 2007). "RPGFan Reviews — Dawn of Mana". RPGFan. Archived from the original on June 20, 2007. Retrieved June 16, 2007.
  33. ^Bramwell, Tom (May 16, 2006). "Mana a Mana". Eurogamer. Archived from the original on December 30, 2013. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  34. ^ abVestal, Andrew (June 7, 2000). "Legend of Mana Full Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on May 2, 2012. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  35. ^ abIGN Staff (June 6, 2000). "Legend of Mana Full Review". IGN. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
  36. ^Andrew P. Bilyk (June 1, 2000). "Different is Good". RPGamer. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved February 16, 2008.
  37. ^Gantayat, Anoop (October 24, 2005). "Mana Developer Revealed". IGN. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012. Retrieved February 15, 2008.
  38. ^"聖剣伝説 Friends of Mana" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on July 9, 2007. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  39. ^ abPereira, Chris (September 20, 2012). "Japanese Cell Phone Treasures: 5 Mobile Games We Won't Be Seeing". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  40. ^ (in Japanese). Famitsu. September 29, 2006. Archived from the original on July 2, 2015. Retrieved February 7, 2016.
  41. ^ abSpencer (December 13, 2012). "Circle Of Mana Announced. Yeah, It's A Social Game". Siliconera. Archived from the original on March 20, 2013. Retrieved March 29, 2013.
  42. ^Romano, Sal (February 1, 2016). "Rise of Mana to end service in March". Gematsu. Archived from the original on January 30, 2016. Retrieved January 29, 2016.
  43. ^Harris, Craig (December 2, 2003). "Sword of Mana Review". IGN. Archived from the original on February 19, 2014. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  44. ^Romano, Sal (February 4, 2016). "Adventures of Mana now available for smartphones". Gematsu. Archived from the original on February 5, 2016. Retrieved February 4, 2016.
  45. ^Riley, Adam; Smith, Lesley (February 8, 2007). "Square Enix on Nintendo DS, Wii, Online, Final Fantasy & More (Full Transcript)". Cubed³. Archived from the original on March 3, 2007. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  46. ^Nickel, Thomas (2006). "Hiromichi Tanaka — Final Fantasy III". G-Wie-Gorilla. Archived from the original on June 25, 2008. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  47. ^"Ring Command". Seiken Densetsu 3 Instruction Booklet (in Japanese). Square Co. September 30, 1995. pp. 16–17. SHVC-A3DJ-JPN.
  48. ^"Ring Commands". Secret of Evermore Instruction Booklet. Square Soft. September 18, 1995. pp. 10–18. U/SNS-AEOE-USA.
  49. ^Square Co. (June 7, 2000). Legend of Mana (PlayStation). Level/area: Monsters Encyclopedia.
  50. ^Square Co. (October 3, 1993). Secret of Mana (Super NES). Level/area: Great Forest.
  51. ^"Battle System". Seiken Densetsu 3 Instruction Booklet (in Japanese). Square Co. September 30, 1995. p. 22. SHVC-A3DJ-JPN.
  52. ^"Battle". Sword of Mana Instruction Booklet. Nintendo. December 1, 2003. p. 30. AGB-AVSE-USA.
  53. ^IGN Staff (June 6, 2000). "Legend of Mana Review". IGN. Archived from the original on October 17, 2015. Retrieved June 14, 2007.
  54. ^Square Co. (October 3, 1993). Secret of Mana (Super NES). Level/area: Elinee's Castle.
  55. ^"Party Member Characters". Legend of Mana Owner's Manual. Square Electronic Arts. December 1, 2003. p. 4. SLUS-01013.
  56. ^Nintendo staff (March 18, 2004). "Sword of Mana". Nintendo. Retrieved February 14, 2008.
  57. ^Brownie Brown (December 1, 2003). Sword of Mana (Game Boy Advance). Level/area: Introduction.
  58. ^Fassino, Justin (November 25, 2006). "Review — Children of Mana (Nintendo DS)". GamesAreFun.com. Archived from the original on September 27, 2011. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  59. ^ abSquare Co. (November 1, 1991). Final Fantasy Adventure (Game Boy). Level/area: Mana Tree.
  60. ^Square Co. (November 1, 1991). Final Fantasy Adventure (Game Boy). Level/area: Dime Tower.
  61. ^ abSquare Co. (August 27, 2000). Trials of Mana (Neill Corlett's fan translation) (Super Famicom) (1.01 ed.). Level/area: Introduction.
  62. ^Square Co. (August 27, 2000). Trials of Mana (Neill Corlett's fan translation) (Super Famicom) (1.01 ed.). Level/area: Temple of Light.
  63. ^Square Co. (October 3, 1993). Secret of Mana (Super NES). Level/area: Pure Land.
  64. ^Athab, Majed (April 15, 2007). "A New Era Dawns for Mana". RPGamer. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007. Retrieved June 14, 2007.
  65. ^ ab"Sprite Magic / The Girl's Magic". Secret of Mana Instruction Booklet. Square Soft. October 3, 1993. pp. 36–39. SNS-K2-USA.
  66. ^"Growth System". Seiken Densetsu 3 Instruction Booklet (in Japanese). Square Co. September 30, 1995. p. 25. SHVC-A3DJ-JPN.
  67. ^ ab"Land Creation System". Legend of Mana Owner's Manual. Square Electronic Arts. December 1, 2003. p. 9. SLUS-01013.
  68. ^"Battle". Sword of Mana Instruction Booklet. Nintendo. December 1, 2003. p. 26. AGB-AVSE-USA.
  69. ^Square Co. (August 27, 2000). Trials of Mana (Neill Corlett's fan translation) (Super Famicom) (1.01 ed.). Level/area: Temple of Light.
  70. ^Square Co. (June 7, 2000). Legend of Mana (PlayStation). Level/area: World History Encyclopedia.
  71. ^Parish, Jeremy (September 22, 2006). "Preview: Dawn of Mana". 1UP.com. Retrieved June 12, 2007.
  72. ^"Monster Picture Book". Seiken Densetsu 3 Kisochishikihen [Seiken Densetsu 3 Basic Knowledge Volume] (in Japanese). NTT Publishing. October 13, 1995. p. 131. ISBN .
  73. ^Riley, Adam (March 10, 2006). "Seiken Densetsu 3 / Secret of Mana 2 Review". Cubed³. Archived from the original on September 28, 2007. Retrieved June 13, 2007.
  74. ^"La gallerie des monstres". Le Guide Officiel Nintendo "Secret of Mana" (in French). Nintendo. November 24, 1994. p. 64. SNSP-K2-FRA/SFRA.
  75. ^Kepper, Sean (June 21, 2000). "Legend of Mana Strategy Guide". GameSpot. Archived from the original on June 12, 2007. Retrieved June 18, 2007.
  76. ^"聖剣伝説 Friends of Mana" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on July 9, 2007. Retrieved June 13, 2007.
  77. ^Leeper, Justin (April 10, 2007). "Heroes of Mana Preview". GameSpy. Archived from the original on March 4, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2007.
  78. ^Kolar, Damir (February 2, 2004). "Final Fantasy X-2 Game Guide". GameSpot. p. 94. Archived from the original on July 27, 2009. Retrieved June 13, 2007.
  79. ^"Legend of Mana Products". RPGFan. Archived from the original on May 19, 2007. Retrieved June 13, 2007.
  80. ^"Modes of Travel". Secret of Mana Instruction Booklet. Square Soft. October 3, 1993. pp. 30–31. SNS-K2-USA.
  81. ^"Means of Local Transportation". Seiken Densetsu 3 Instruction Booklet (in Japanese). Square Co. September 30, 1995. p. 27. SHVC-A3DJ-JPN.
  82. ^Square Co. (June 7, 2000). Legend of Mana (PlayStation). Level/area: World History Encyclopedia.
  83. ^Square Co. (October 3, 1993). Secret of Mana (Super NES). Level/area: Mana Fortress.
  84. ^Square Co. (June 7, 2000). Legend of Mana (PlayStation). Level/area: World History Encyclopedia.
  85. ^ abCocoeBiz staff. "News". CocoeBiz. Archived from the original on May 16, 2007. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  86. ^Ezaki, Kahori; McCawley, James (December 2004). "Interview with CocoeBiz in December 2004". CocoeBiz. Archived from the original on July 18, 2007. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
  87. ^Kikuta, Hiroki (August 25, 1995). Seiken Densetsu 2 Original Sound Version (liner notes) (in Japanese). NTT Publishing. PSCN-5030.
  88. ^ abJeriaska; Yamamoto, Taka (June 9, 2007). "Where Angels Fear to Tread: A Conversation with Hiroki Kikuta". Square Haven. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  89. ^RocketBaby staff (2001). "Interview with Hiroki Kikuta". RocketBaby. Archived from the original on November 4, 2013. Retrieved June 15, 2007.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mana_(series)

Similar news:

Okay, so back in the 90's there was a sequel to Secret of Mana released only in Japan known as Seiken Densetsu 3. Enable ‘Set Time Automatically’ to show the current date & time on Trials of Mana new tab, or disable it to set date & time manually. Trials of Mana (聖剣伝説3 Seiken Densetsu Surī, lit. "Holy Sword Legend 3") is an action role-playing game originally published by Square (now Square Enix), and is the third game of the Mana series. Initially released exclusively in Japan for Nintendo 's Super Famicom console in 1995, Seiken Densetsu 3 was notable as being one of the hallmark games ... Play with all six main characters. Final Fantasy Adventure (Mystic Quest in Europe, and Seiken Densetsu: Final Fantasy Gaiden or "Legend of the Holy Sword: Final Fantasy Gaiden" in Japan) is a spin-off title from Square's (now Square-Enix) Final Fantasy series released for Nintendo's Game Boy handheld console. The remake's creators have tried to reflect the content of the original and often succeeded with stunning results, and comparing individual areas, characters, or boss fights with their previous incarnations is a pleasure. Trials of Mana update adds difficulty setting, level reset option in New Game Plus. There's so much to like in the trailer, let's just hope it all comes together well in the end. "Holy Sword Legend Collection") is an anthology release of the first three titles of the Mana series.It was released initially in Japan on June 1, 2017, including Final Fantasy Adventure, Secret of Mana, and Seiken Densetsu 3 in their original formats. I have such nostalgia for Secret of Mana I don't know. Here’s the press release: During today’s Nintendo Direct presentation, SQUARE ENIX® unveiled that the highly anticipated remake of Trials of Mana™ will launch on April 24, 2020 for the Nintendo Switch™ system, PlayStation®4 computer entertainment system and STEAM® with […] sparkede spilsommeren i gang med manér den 11 juni 2021 kl. 2019. A quick save feature for all three games has been added and local co-op is also possible in Secret of Mana and Trials of Mana. It will begin this Friday and last for 5 days. Interviews PC PS4 Switch Top Trials of Mana interview with Shinichi Tatsuke and Masaru Oyamada – remake changes, co-op removal, clear time, and more . 05.01. Loading next content. All Discussions ... Also have the original on my PSP even tho i have the Mana collection... (would rather play it on PSP over that garbage nintablet anyday) 1: I'd love to see you sit in a train, holding a laptop up in front of you, plaing ToM. First time playing these games but always been a fan of the series, i already own secret of mana on mini snes but it's nice having all 3 in the same collection and it's the best and only simple way to get the 3rd game - Trials of Mana in the west. Jason Schreier. Shylaar. 234d ago. In Ishii's opinion, Mana is not a series of video games, but rather a world which is illustrated by and can be explored through video games. Brand New. Trials of Mana originally released to a Japanese audience in 1995 as a sequel to the popular, multiplayer RPG Secret of Mana. Square Enix Considers Trials of Mana a Major Sales Success. Today, Crunchyroll Games announced that its newest JRPG title Last Cloudia is available now on smartphone devices. Meanwhile, an american team at SquareSoft released another sequel to the same title, Secret of Evermore. For the current version, see Adventures of Mana. Game profile of Trials of Mana (PlayStation 4) first released 24th Apr 2020, developed by Square Enix and published by Square Enix. $44.95 +$4.95 shipping. $29.99. Titled Trials of Mana, we finally received a localized version of Seiken Densetsu 3!! https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/WorldOfMana This is a Silver trophy. Daria, Gem Valley (called Gemstone Valley Dorian in the fan translation) is a dungeon in Trials of Mana. Like the Shimmering Ruins and the Woods of Wandara, it is inaccessible without the Flammie Drum. Also, to make magic worth a damn you have to pause the game and and spam spells every single fight, which kills the pace. -0.5. Trials of Mana Flere » Final Fantasy VII: Remake Intergrade - forbedringer på PS5 den 12 juni 2021 kl. Series Producer: We Want To Bring The Glory Back. For Collection of Mana on the Nintendo Switch, a GameFAQs message board topic titled "Is Trials of Mana...". Trials of Mana is the 3D remake of the hit classic RPG released in 1995 as Seiken Densetsu 3. Despite being … Well, Trials of Mana, the upcoming remake of its sequel, looks nothing like it. Drag the original “Trials of Mana-WindowsNoEditor.pak” onto UNPACK-TOM.bat It will take a while to unpack. The good news: Seiken Densetsu 3, the sequel to Secret of Mana, is finally available outside Japan for the first time, and it’s now called Trials of Mana. 6. 1 available. The Secret of Mana was first remade in 2018, Collection of Mana launched exclusively on the Switch in 2019 (Europe), and this was followed a year later by a remaster of 1995's Trials of Mana. In fact, Trials of Mana is a remake of the third game in the series (1995's Seiken Densetsu 3). Both games took inspiration from their predecessor, but went in very different directions. When working on the series, Koichi Ishii draws inspiration from abstract images from his memo… 5 out of 5 stars. Back at E3 Trials of Mana producers Masaru Oyamada and Shinichi Tatsuke told us that the remake needs to deal with "idealised memories", and at Gamescom we actually caught up with the pair of them once again to hear about the RPG, which is coming on April 24 next year. Automatically hides all elements on the newtab with ‘Auto Hide’ setting, showing only Trials of Mana wallpapers. PlayStation 4 and Steam versions are promised for 2020. Have you got any tips or tricks to unlock this achievement? Last one. TrueSteamAchievements. 1 Enemies 1.1 2D Version 1.2 2020 Remake 1.2.1 Chapter V 2 … ★ FreeAddon’s Trials of Mana Custom New Tab extension is completely free to use. Trials of Mana is the 3D remake of the hit classic RPG released in 1995 as Seiken Densetsu 3. I think i have 4 of the useless stuff. Game profile of Trials of Mana (PlayStation 4) first released 24th Apr 2020, developed by Square Enix and published by Square Enix. It sounds like the recent PlayStation 4 remake Trials of Mana has quietly done really … Collection of Mana is a $40 package containing the first three games in the Mana series: Final Fantasy Adventure for … / 聖剣伝説3 TRIALS of MANA Original Soundtrack / Seiken Densetsu 3: TRIALS of MANA Original Soundtrack. Shylaar. Gaming. Full Review! Manage your Game Collection, measure your progress across entire game series, even set scoring and completion goals and we'll chart your attempts at reaching them! 14:00 Welcome the let's play of Trials of Mana! 6/17/19 6:30PM. Beneath Trials of Mana ’s cartoonish 3D makeover and questionable voice acting, it’s the same simple, satisfying action RPG it’s always been. The legendary Jewel Eater is born every 1,000 years here. How to unlock the Nevarlan Thief trophy in Trials of Mana: Complete Hawkeye's story. Free shipping. I know the Secret Of Mana remake wasn't received too well but I'm really hyped for Trials of Mana. How to unlock the Altenish Magician achievement in Trials of Mana: Complete Angela's story. With Legends of Mana releasing on June 24, 2021, fans on current platforms now have access to five entries within the Mana series. The game will also have a special limited time event with Square Enix’ Press desired hotkey. Title: Trials of Mana … N/A Fan Arrange. Mana. In today’s Nintendo Direct, a release date for the remake of Trials of Mana was announced. 12 sold. by kimbkyll Aug 18, 2020. 09:00 Det bedste (og værste) Far Cry-spil den 6 juni 2021 kl. I got 2 class change items for the classes i wanted back to back. Mana. Legend of Mana first released over 20 years ago on the PS1, but is getting a PS4 remaster later this month – and here’s a glimpse of the opening cinematic. Series Producer: We Want To Bring The Glory Back. Trials of Mana update adds difficulty setting, level reset option in New Game Plus. 2020's Trials of Mana has surpassed 1 million copies sold, according to the game's … Jun 11, 2019 @ 4:24pm Charlotte's dialogue "Whewe awe you ... For what it's worth they also did this with her speech in the Mana Collection version of the game. Quantity. Mana, that looks nice. Quick Jump Gaming Forum Gaming Hangouts EtcetEra Forum EtcetEra Hangouts Trending Threads Latest Threads Watched threads. Trials of Mana is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community.Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so. I like the style of the Secret of Mana soundtrack, but the SD3/Trials of Mana has a great many more tracks and does have gems I like. How to unlock the Valsenan Swordsman trophy in Trials of Mana: Complete Duran's story. Trials of Mana > General Discussions > Topic Details. Free shipping for many products! Condition. 9 h 53 m 2 s . Mana Sword's Chosen. Gaming. Have you got any tips or tricks to unlock this achievement? 12:00 Tidsplan for E3-konferencer og andre store nyheder i sommeren 2021 den 4 juni 2021 kl. The good news: Seiken Densetsu 3, the sequel to Secret of Mana, is finally available outside Japan for the first time, and it’s now called Trials of Mana. The bad news: Collection of Mana, the Switch game that includes Trials, doesn’t have a manual, and Trials is a complicated game. Here’s what you should know before you start. item 7 Trials of Mana - Nintendo Switch (NEW) 7 -Trials of Mana - Nintendo Switch (NEW) $29.98. After Flammie drops you off on the sacred ground, the party will find bodies scattered from Nevarl, Ferolia and Altena alike. Both games took inspiration from their predecessor, but went in very different directions. Thanks to a very popular and widespread fan translation rom, many English speakers were able to play this game back in the 90's and 2000's (more on SD3 below). One of the most surprising announcements at E3 last week was Trials of Mana… Feature: Behind The Scenes On Collection Of Mana And Trials Of Mana. 12:00 Afløseren mener: Summer Game Fest Kickoff Live! News gamefreaks365.com. Sanctuary of Mana. Experience the beloved adventure fully modernized with graphic improvements, character voiceover support, a remastered soundtrack and a new episode which you can experience after the ending, in addition to an ability … Buy Trials of Mana Steam key to explore beautiful environments, each of which looks very pleasing to the eye, swarming with style, color, and detail. Ultimate starting April 24th. Trials of Mana. Also it's a lazy collection cause Square Enix did nothing with any of the games, Trials of Mana is still a 2-Player game rather than 3-Player unlike … Fandom Apps Take your favorite fandoms with you and never miss a beat. Some enemies spawn in a different place on the map and some are replaced by other enemies altogether. News. Meanwhile, an american team at SquareSoft released another sequel to the same title, Secret of Evermore. News gamefreaks365.com. It is where you fight Land Umber, the Benevodon of Earth. 40° Switch eShop deals - Celeste, Collection of Mana, Digimon Story, Ghostbusters, Trials of Mana, more. About this item. Add to Cart. All hotkeys can be changed on the trainer. Special features are scarce as well. “Secret of Mana 2″ in Europe, and the US, as it is the successor to the famous SNES Action RPG), and for official game versions. AOTF has reviewed TRIALS of MANA: Trials of Mana Review Remake of the third Mana game. D&D Beyond Trials of Mana (聖剣伝説3 Seiken Densetsu Surī, lit. "Holy Sword Legend 3") is an action role-playing game originally published by Square (now Square Enix), and is the third game of the Mana series. Initially released exclusively in Japan for Nintendo's Super Famicom console in 1995, Seiken Densetsu... 229d ago. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Trials of Mana, Square Enix, Nintendo Switch, 662248923468 at the best online prices at eBay! This article is about the 1991 release. TRIALS of MANA Original Soundtrack. Collection of Mana brings the first three titles in the seminal Mana series to the Nintendo SwitchTM in a beautiful all-in-one package; perfect for when you are on the go! Usually, one class outclassed the other three (ex: Hawk’s Nightblade), while for others, one class was completely underwhelming (ex: Lise’s … Almost at lvl 4 … Release Year. - All listings for this product. Characters have charming, anime-inspired 3D models and you’ll be able to switch between your team members with complete ease, and at any time you choose! As to which I like better, it's a toss up. 234d ago. [Event] The Spirits of Mana. Listen for ‘Trainer Activated’. Trials of Mana is part of the Mana series series, a good topic.This is identified as among the best series of articles produced by the Wikipedia community. -0.5. Seiken Densetsu 3 / Trials of Mana – Class Balance v2.2, by hmsong For the most part, the original game’s class system was rather poorly balanced. Two years later, the U.S. version is out, and not much has changed. News Square Enix celebrates Trials of Mana's 25th birthday with a sizable update 2020-10-17 News We're jumping into Trials of Mana for today's stream 2020-04-28 News Trials of Mana trailer shows off Hawkeye and Riesz 2020-01-22 Secret of Mana has always been one of the more discussed games from that period, though most at the time did not realize it was actually the second … The bad news: Collection of Mana, the Switch game that includes Trials, doesn’t have a manual, and Trials is a complicated game. Here’s what you should know before you start. Square Enix confirmed when exactly the full-fledged remake of 1995's Seiken Densetsu 3, aka Trials of Mana… It's priced at $40 US--pretty steep considering other retro game collections are priced at $19.99 US. Nintendo announced the next spirit event coming to Super Smash Bros. Almost finished FF Adventure the first one, was very fun … Trials of Mana is part of the Mana series series, a good topic.This is identified as among the best series of articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Play with all six main characters. Since then, it has enjoyed ongoing success - … Mana Sword's Chosen achievement in Trials of Mana. 40° Switch eShop deals - Celeste, Collection of Mana, Digimon Story, Ghostbusters, Trials of Mana, more. Trials of Mana is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community.Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so. Trials of Mana Trainer +24. Mana Sword's Chosen achievement in Trials of Mana. Last April, Square Enix released a remake of Trials of Mana on the Nintendo Switch and multiple other platforms.. There is no turning back as you need to claim the Sword of Mana for your party's individual motivations as well as to prevent the other sides from gaining it. Despite that awful snare drum, I love its music. SQEX-10783~5 Soundtrack. item 2 Collection of Mana (Nintendo Switch, 2019) US Physical Edition FF Secret Trials 1 - Collection of Mana (Nintendo Switch, 2019) US Physical Edition FF Secret Trials. Okay, so back in the 90's there was a sequel to Secret of Mana released only in Japan known as Seiken Densetsu 3. Square Enix has revealed that it will be celebrating the 25th anniversary of Trials of Mana with a new update to the game which will bring several challenging modes to test the skills of seasoned veterans. With Switch's Trials of Mana remake now just a handful of weeks away from release, developer Square Enix has teased a limited edition system featuring artwork … This is a Silver trophy. Screenshots und Informationen für das Rollenspiel-Spiel Trials of Mana mit Spieletipps, aktuellen News, Tests und Downloads. Thanks to a very popular and widespread fan translation rom, many English speakers were able to play this game back in the 90's and 2000's (more on SD3 below). - The Game … Collection of Mana will be available on Nintendo Switch today and includes the first three titles in the Mana series: Adventures of Mana (also known as Final Fantasy Adventure), Secret of Mana, and Trials of Mana. Time left. This daring tale of overcoming the tests of fate has been given new life! Description: Several patches for the English and German fan translation of “Seiken Densetsu 3″/”Trials of Mana” (a.k.a. The title, as well as Secret of Mana and Collection of Mana, will also be receiving hefty discounts running from October 14 to November 2. 6. Really neat game, similar to a 3D Octopath Traveler. News Old School RPG Remake Trials of Mana Tops 1 Million Sales. See Trials of Mana translation article for further examples.. 06.03. How to unlock the Bonds of Allies achievement in Trials of Mana: First time learning a companion's chain ability. Manage your Game Collection, measure your progress across entire game series, even set scoring and completion goals … … Then i declined the item. Meet a colorful cast of characters, use the unique "Land Make" System to build the World Map, and square off against fearsome monsters in the vibrant world of Fa’Diel. The HD Remaster of Legend of Mana is coming to Steam. Is Trials of Mana the Best Remake? It was for the third character too. You can just copy the name from the mesh in the collection view if that’s easier. In all difficulties, the entire party will be awarded EXP if the battle is won even if some party members are 0 HP. 229d ago. 6/17/19 6:30PM. Of the many surprises we got at E3 2019, the confirmation that the Mana series would be getting a … What Is Trials of Mana? Trials of Mana originally released to a Japanese audience in 1995 as a sequel to the popular, multiplayer RPG Secret of Mana. 59. Commentary and Facecam. The font is now smaller than the 2000 fan translation and a whole new translation of the game has been added. / Meridian: Melancholy Music from Trials of Mana / Meridian: Melancholy Music from Trials of Mana. Trials of Mana is the English name of the Japanese video game Seiken Densetsu 3, sometimes mistakenly called Secret of Mana 2, which originally was developed and published by Log in 2: I … The trilogy of classic Mana games is an essential collection for fans, old and new alike. The SNES was filled with numerous classic RPGs, a large majority of which came from the two brands that merged later to become Square Enix. The legend lives on. During Square Enix’s E3 presentation, they revealed the fourth entry of Trials of Mana series is receiving an HD remaster that includes a few new features. What Is Trials of Mana? And the original Trials is...Well, it's not bad. The Mana series is the result of Koichi Ishii's desire to create a fictional world. 59. This time, the event will feature spirits from the Trials Of Mana to celebrate the release of the game on Switch, including three brand new spirits. Trials of Mana HD Remake Release Date Revealed. Collection of Mana, released in Japan as Seiken Densetsu Collection, is now available for Switch via the Nintendo eShop in North America and Europe … Secret of Mana's combat is clunky and awkward, and the difficulty is all over the place at times.

Terrain Constructible Fontenay-le-comte, Cité Fontenay-aux-roses, Composition Equipe De France France Allemagne, Audrey Bourolleau Départ, Villa Cahuzac Gimont Avis, Jurisprudence Concours Fonction Publique, Lévitique Signification, Genève Cornavin Aéroport, Paper Mario : The Origami King 2 Joueurs, La Famille En Espagnol Carte Mentale, Reflexe Prévention Santé Cic,

Sours: https://doovision-sante.com/nyic/collection-of-mana-v%27s-trials-of-mana


1453 1454 1455 1456 1457