5x5 chess board

5x5 chess board DEFAULT

Minichess

Family of chess variants played on a smaller board

The game of Tic Tac Chec, played on a 4x4 board

Minichess is a family of chess variants played with regular chess pieces and standard rules, but on a smaller board.[1] The motivation for these variants is to make the game simpler and shorter than the standard chess. The first chess-like game implemented on a computer was a 6×6 chess variant Los Alamos chess. The low memory capacity of the early days computer required reduced board size and smaller number of pieces to make the game implementable on a computer.

3×3 and 3×4 boards[edit]

Chess on a 3×3 board does not have any clearly defined starting position. However, it is a solved game: the outcome of every possible position is known. The best move for each side is known as well. The game was solved independently by Aloril in 2001 and by Kirill Kryukov in 2004. The solution by Kryukov is more complete, since it allows pawns to be placed everywhere, not only on the second row as by Aloril. The longest checkmate on 3×3 board takes 16 moves. The number of legal positions is 304,545,552.[2]

In 2009 Kryukov reported solving 3×4 chess.[3] On this board there are 167,303,246,916 legal positions and the longest checkmate takes 43 moves.

4×4, 4×5 and 4×8 chess[edit]

In 1981 mathematician David Silverman suggested 4×4 chess variant shown on the diagram.[4] The first player wins easily in this game (1. axb3+ Qxb3 2. cxb3+ Kxb3 (or 2...Kb4 3. bxc3 checkmate) 3. bxa3+ Kc4 4. Qa2 checkmate), so Silverman proposed a variant: Black can select a pawn, and White must make a first move with this pawn. However, in this case Black wins even more easily (select pawn b2, 1.bxa3 (or 1.bxc3) b2+ 2. Qxb2 Qxb2 checkmate). To make the variant more playable, Silverman finally proposed to insert a row between pawns and use the board 4×5. In this variant, pawns can move two squares on their first move, if the target square is free.

The 1995 game Tic Tac Chec, invented by Don Green, is played on a 4×4 board which starts empty. Each player has a knight, a rook, a bishop and a pawn, and players may place a piece on the board as their turn. Once each player has three pieces in play, pieces may be moved. Captured pieces are returned to the opponent, and may be replayed. A player wins if they are able to arrange their pieces into a line of four.[5][6]

Another chess variant on a 4×5 board, Microchess, was invented by Glimne in 1997.[4] Castling is allowed in this variant.

There is also variant on a 4×8 board, Demi-chess, which was invented by Peter Krystufek in 1986.[7] Castling is allowed in this variant.

5×5 chess[edit]

A board needs to be five squares wide to contain all kinds of chess pieces on the first row. In 1969, Martin Gardner suggested a chess variant on 5×5 board in which all chess moves, including pawn double-move, en-passant capture as well as castling can be made.[8] Later AISE (Associazione Italiana Scacchi Eterodossi, "Italian Heterodox Chess Association") abandoned pawn double-move and castling. The game was largely played in Italy (including by correspondence) and opening theory was developed. The statistics of the finished games is the following:[4]

  • White won 40% of games.
  • Black won 28%.
  • 32% were draws.

Mehdi Mhalla and Frederic Prost weakly solved Gardner minichess in 2013 and proved the game-theoretic value to be a draw.[9] Gardner minichess was also played by AISE with suicide chess and progressive chess rules. In 1980 HP shipped the HP-41C programmable calculator, which could play this game.[10] The calculator was able to play on quite a decent level.

In 1989, Martin Gardner proposed another setup, which he called Baby chess. In difference from Gardner minichess, black pieces are mirrored. Paul Jacobs and Marco Meirovitz suggested another starting position for 5×5 chess shown at the right.

Jeff Mallett (main developer of Zillions of Games) suggested a setup in which white has two knights against two black bishops.[11] Mhalla and Prost proved Mallett chess to be a forced win for White in 25 moves,[clarification needed] although theoretically the game is drawn when played perfectly if White is given the bishops and Black the knights rather than vice-versa.[12]

5×6 chess[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minichess

Screenshots

Description

A chess variant on 5-by-5 board. Not easier, not harder than the classic game, but as much fun. Very suitable for teaching small kids chess.

A chess variant on 5×5 board, the simplified version of the classic chess. You can play against the computer (several levels of difficulty) or use the app as a chess board when playing with a partner.
Exceptions from the standard chess rules: the pawn double-move and castling are not allowed.

- General update for iOS v.14
- Enhancements in the AI of the game
- Indication of the current difficulty level
- Show error when putting the king in check or for some other wrong moves (optionally)
- A few other minor issues

Ratings and Reviews

Took me some games to finally figure out checkmate.

At first was stumped and was thinking there was no way to win. But there is way for checkmate.

Fun

If you like chess give it a try. Surprisingly interesting.

The developer, Golmium, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

Data Not Collected

The developer does not collect any data from this app.

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

Information

Seller
Golmium Software Inc.

Size
4.5 MB

Category
Games

Compatibility
iPhone
Requires iOS 14.1 or later.
iPad
Requires iPadOS 14.1 or later.
iPod touch
Requires iOS 14.1 or later.
Mac
Requires macOS 11.0 or later and a Mac with Apple M1 chip.

Age Rating
4+

Copyright
© Golmium Software Inc.

Price
Free

In-App Purchases

  1. Mini Chess 5x5 full version$0.99

Supports

  • Family Sharing

    With Family Sharing set up, up to six family members can use this app.

More By This Developer

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Sours: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/mini-chess-5x5/id1457707362
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Template:Chess diagram 5x5

These templates shows a chess diagram, a graphic representation of a position in a chess game, using standardised symbols resembling the pieces of the standard Staunton chess set. The default template for a standard chess board is {{Chess diagram}}. This documentation covers all related templates.

Templates[edit]

There are several standard chess diagram templates:

There are also templates for chess variants:

Syntax[edit]

The syntax is basically the same for all chess diagram templates.

{{Chess diagram | <alignment> (param #1) | <header> (#2) | size = | numbers = | letters = | <a8> | <b8> | ... | <h8> (#3 to ... | <a7> | <b7> | ... | <h7> ... | <a1> | <b1> | ... | <h1> ( ... #66) | <footer> (#67) | reverse = }}

Parameters:

  • – defines horizontal alignment (floating) of the whole table, must be or (or nothing)
  • – the text which appears above the diagram, may be empty;
  • - specifies the size of each square in pixels, the default is 26.
  • - specifies whether the rows are numbered. Options are: left, right, both (default) or neither.
  • - specifies whether the columns are lettered. Options are: top, bottom, both (default) or neither.
  • – define corresponding squares of the chessboard, see below;
  • – the text which appears beneath the diagram, may be empty; optional – can be left out (currently not in the other templates)

A square is defined by the name of piece or empty parameter. The names of the pieces are those given in algebraic notation:

These letters are combined with either "l" for Light=White, or "d" for Dark=Black. So "kl" is White's king, and "nd" is Black's knight.

An empty square is written either using underscores, spaces, or nothing at all. Two spaces are recommended.

  • Chess d45.svgChess l45.svg <space> = empty square

Fairy Chess[edit]

There are also some fairy chess pieces available:

Omega Chess pieces:

Other suitable images include: Chess klg45.svgChess elg45.svgChess nlg45.svgChess slg45.svgChess plg45.svgChess Mdt45.svgChess Mlt45.svgChess Glt45.svgRoyalKnightFinish Done.svg

Other symbols[edit]

You can also use "xx" for a black cross, "ox" for a white cross, "xo" for a black circle on an empty square or "oo" for a white one.

When showing movement directions on the board, arrows are available

Numbers can also be added to squares by using "x0" for 0, "x1" for 1, "x2" for 2, ..., "x9" for 9.

Examples[edit]

Standard diagram[edit]

This diagram is recommended for common use as a main diagram in the articles on chess openings, endings, games, positions etc. See the corresponding code below.

{{Chess diagram | tright | |rd|nd|bd|qd|kd|bd|nd|rd |pd|pd|pd|pd| |pd|pd|pd | | | | | | | | | | | | |pd| | | | | | | |pl|pl| | | | | | | | | | |pl|pl|pl|pl| | |pl|pl |rl|nl|bl|ql|kl|bl|nl|rl | The King's Gambit }}
abcdefgh
8
Chessboard480.svg
8
77
66
55
44
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22
11
abcdefgh

Empty board

{{Chess diagram | tright | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Empty board }}

Diagram with both captions[edit]

W. Langstaff, Chess Amateur 1922

Mate in two.
This problem uses partial retrograde analysis method.

It may be convenient to use this in the articles on chess problems. Please note that in the header and footer you can use bolds or italics. You can also use to break the lines.

{{Chess diagram | tright | '''W. Langstaff''', ''Chess Amateur'' 1922 | | | | |kd| | |rd | | | | | | | | | | | | | |bl| |pl | | | |rl| |kl|pd|pl | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | '''Mate in two.''' <br> This problem uses ''partial retrograde analysis'' method. }}

Diagram without captions[edit]

See the corresponding code below. If you don't want the captions, just remove them, but don't delete the second "|" pipe character for the caption above; it is possible to delete the last pipe for the longer caption below.

The diagram floats to the left to illustrate the use of the first parameter.

{{Chess diagram | tleft | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |xx|xo|xx| | | | | | |pl| | | | | | | | | | |xo| | | | | | |xx|xo|xx| | | | | | |pl| | | | | | | | | | }}

Movement example[edit]

This can be used to show how pieces move.

Example showing how white king can move

any direction, but only one square, while black rook can move any number of squares but only up and down, and right and left.

{{Chess diagram | tleft | | | |ua| | | | | | | |ua| | | | | |la|la|rd|ra|ra|ra|ra|ra | | |da| | | | | | | |da| |ul|ua|ur| | | |da| |la|kl|ra| | | |da| |dl|da|dr| | | |da| | | | | |Example showing how white king can move any direction, but only one square, while black rook can move any number of squares but only up and down, and right and left. }} {{Chess diagram | tright | | |ul| |ua| |ur| | | | |ul|ua|ur| | | |la|la|la|ql|ra|ra|ra|ra | | |dl|da|dr| | | | |dl| |da| |dr| | |dl| | |da| | |dr| | | | |da| | | |dr | | | |da| | | | }}

In the board on the right, it is shown that the white queen can go any distance in any of these directions.

Another method for the rook example:

{{Chess diagram | tleft | | | | | | | | | | | |ud| | | | | | |lr|rd|lr| | | | | | |ud| | | | | | | | | |ul|ua|ur| | | | | |la|kl|ra| | | | | |dl|da|dr| | | | | | | | | }}

Small diagram[edit]

This one may be useful in articles with many diagrams. It uses another template named {{Chess diagram small}}.

The small diagrams can have header, too.

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Chess_diagram_5x5
M16-Divide and Conquer Defective Chess Board

N by N chess games

Mathematician A. Missoum designed chess variants that can be played on n by n boards, for natural numbers n that are not necessarily 8. Read below for boards with odd or with even sized sides.

by A. Missoum

In this article, I will introduce the (2k+1) x (2k+1) chess games for k a positive integer.

1) For k=1 we have the (2x1+1) x(2x1+1) chess game, or the 3x3 chess game. I fact, it is simply a 3x3 Merel game, where two players oppose each other. Each one has three pawns, and the winner is the first who can align horizontally, vertically or diagonally its pawns on the board (see board 1.)

BOARD(1)

2) For k=2, we have the (2x2+1) x (2x2+1) chess game, or the 5x5 chess game. It is preferable to call it a checker game if we simply use the pawns. See Board(2).

BOARD(2)

The pawns move and captures as those of the checker game. The 5x5 chess game can also be considered as a 5x5 Merel game, where the winner is one who first align his five pawns horizontally, vertically or diagonally on the squares of the board. We can also conider the 5x5 chess game as follows: The initial arrangement of piece is as in board(3).

BOARD(3)

Each player has 2 pawns, 1 Firzan which moves and captures like the Firzan(queen) of the Shatranj game (i.e., it moves and captures one square diagonally), 1 King which moves and captures like the King of the 8x8 chess game, and 1 Knight which moves 1 square vertically and one horizonally and vice-versa. The Pawn moves and captures like the Pawn of the chess game. When promoted it can be a Knight, a Firzan or a Pawn.

3)For k=3, we have the (2x3 +1)x (2x3+1) chess game, or the 7x7 chess game. The initial arrangement of pieces(pawns) is as in board(4). Two players oppose each other, one has black pieces, and the other has white pieces. Each player has 2 Rooks, 2 knights, 2 Bishops, 1 King and 7 Pawns.

BOARD(4)

The pawns, the Knight, the Bishop, the Rook and the King move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. The prise en passant is still valid. The two Bishops in both side of the King compensate for the lack of the Queen in this game. The castling is still valid that is: the King on d1 moves to f1 and the Rook on g1 moves to e1, or the King on d1 moves to b1 and the Rook on a1 moves to c1. The promoted pawn can be any of the pieces, or a pawn, except for the King. The game ends with the mate of the King of one side.

4) For k=4, we have the (2x4+1) x(2x4+1) chess game, or the 9x9 chess game. The initial arrangement of pieces (pawns) is as in the board(5). Two players oppose each other. One has white pieces, the other has black pieces. Each player has 2 Rooks, 2 Knights, 2 Bishops, 2 Queens, 1 King and 9 pawns. The pieces (Knight, Rook, Queen, King and pawn) move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. The introduction of the two queens in both sides of the King fills the remaining two squares d1 and f1, resp d8 and f8) in both sides of the King. In this game, there is no need to replace the Queen by another piece with specific move and capture (for exemple an elephant, a camel, or something else). The Bishop moves and captures only two squares diagonally. In fact, if the Bishop moves and captures like the Bishop of the 8x8 chess, the game became more faster than the 8x8 chess game and therefore less interesting, even it presents some symmetry which is unnecessary. Apparently, the 8x8 chess is does not look a a symmetrical chess game, however, it is devised in a way that the initial arrangement of pieces (pawns) on the chess board reflects the play between a player and its mirror image.

BOARD(5)

The castling is as follows: King on f1 moves to i1, and Rook on j1 moves to h1, or King on f1 move to b1 and Rook on a1 moves to c1.=20

A promoted pawn can be any of the pieces, or a pawn except for the King. The prise en passant is still valid. At the satrt of the game, the pawn can move two squres at a time.

5) For k= 5, we have the (2x5+1) x (2x5+1) chess game, or the 11 x 11 chess game. Two players oppose each other, one has white pieces, the other has black pieces. Each player has 2 Rooks, 4 knights, 4 Bishops, 1 king and 11 pawns. The initial arrangement of pieces(pawns) is as in board(6). The pieces Rook, Bishop, and pawn move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. However, at the start of the game, the pawn can move three, two, or one square at a time. The Knight moves and captures like the Knight of the 8x8 chess game.

In this game, there is no Queen, and this is compensated by the introduction of two bishops and two knights in both sides of the King. Also the King has the option of moving one square or two squares at a time during the game. The castling is as follows:

Small castling: King on f1 moves to i1, and Rook on k1 moves to h1.

Great castling: King on f1 moves to c1, and Rook on a1 moves to d1.


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BOARD(6)

6) For k=6, we have the (2x6+1) x (2x6+1) chess game, or the 13 x 13 chess game. Two players oppose each other. One has white pieces, the other has black pieces. Each player has 2 Rooks, 4 Knights, 4 Bishops, two Queens, 1 King and 13 pawns. The initial arrangement of pieces(Pawns) is as in board(7). The Pawns, the Knight, the Queen, and the Rook move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. The Bishop is limited to move only a maximum of four squares diagonally.

This will make the game more interesting and less fast as the 8x8 chess game.

At the start of the game, the Pawn can move one, two, three or four squares at a time. The prise en passant is still valid in this game. The promoted pawn can be any of the pieces except for the King. The King has the option of moving one, two or three squares at a time. The castling is as follows :

The great castling: King on g1 moves to c1, and Rook on a1 moves to d1.

The Small castling: King on g1 moves k1 and the Rook on m1 moves to j1.


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BOARD(7)

7) For k=7, we have the (2x7+1) x (2x7+1) chess game, or the 15 x 15 chess game. Two players oppose each other. One has white pieces, the other has black pieces. Each player has 2 Rooks, 6 Knights, 6 Bishops, two Queens, 1 King, and 15 pawns. The initial arrangement of pieces (pawns) is as in board(8). The Rook, Bishop, Queen move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. The knight has the option of moving 3 squares vertically and three squares horizontally and vice-versa, or like the Knight of the 8x8 chess. The King can either move one, or two squares at a time. He moves horizontally, vertically or diagonally. The castling is as follows:

Small Castling: King on h1 moves to m1, and Rook on o1 moves to l1.

Great castling: King on h1 moves to c1 and Rook on a1 moves to d1.

At the start of the game, the pawn has the option of moving one, two, three or four squares at a time. Then he can only move one square at a time.


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BOARD(8)

The lack of the Queen in this game is compensated by the presence of the 6Knights and 6 Bishops in both side of the King.

8) For k=8, we have the (2x8 + 1) x (2 x8 +1) chess game, or the 17 x17 chess game. Two players oppose each other. One has white pieces, the other has black pieces. Each player has 2 Rooks, 6 Knights, 6 Bishops, 2 Queens, 1 King and 17 Pawns. The initial arrangement of piece(pawns) is as in board (9). The Rook, the Queen move and capture as those of the 8x8 chess game. The Bishop can only move a maximum of 5 squares in diagonal. The King can move one, two, three or four squares at a time. At the start of the game, the pawn has the option of moving one two, three, four or five squares at a time The prise en passant is still valid in this game. The knight can either move like the knight of the 13x13 chess, or 15x15 chess.

The castling is as follows:

Small castling: King on i1 moves to n1, rook on q1 moves to m1

Great castling: King on i1 moves to d1, Rook on a1 moves to e1


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BOARD(8)

The 17 x17 chess game can be also played as a four handed 8x8 chess game, see board (10).

FOUR HANDED 8x8 CHESS GAME


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BOARD(10)

This game is played between four persons each one has an 8x8 chessboard.

9) For k=9, we have the (2x9+1) x (2x9+1) chess game, or the 19 x 19 chess game. Two players oppose each other. One has white pieces, the other has black pieces. The initial arrangement of pieces(pawns) is as in board(11). Each player has 2 Rooks, 8 knights, 8 Bishops, 1 King, and 19 pawns. The pieces move and capture as those of the 17 x17 chess game. The Knight can move 4 squares vertically and three squares horizontally and vice-versa. At the start of the game, the pawn has the option of moving 6 squares at a time, then he can move, one or two squares at a time. The prise en passant is still valid. The King can move one, two or three squares at a time. The castling is as follows:

Small castling: The King on j1 moves to p1, and the Rook on s1 moves to o1.

Great castling: The king on j1 moves to d1 and the Rook on a1 moves e1.

In this game, the lack of the Queen is compensated by the presence of 8 knights and 8 bishops on both sides of the King. This game can be also played as a four handed 9x9 chess game.


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BOARD(11)

We can continue the sequence of (2k+1) x (2k+1) chess games, for k a positive integer.

In this article I will limit the sequence to the 19 x19 chess game which is still playable and cannot take longer than the 8x8 chess game if we use the extended moves of the pieces. What we observe in the sequence of (2k+1) x (2k+1) chess games is that the King is always the point of symmetry and in both sides of it are specific number of Knights, and Bishops for specific positive integers k.

Mathematical Remarks

The following table(1) gives the number of Knights, Bishops, Queens and pawns used in the sequence of (2k+1)x(2k+1) chess games:

Now, for each positive integer k, there are two Rooks, k pawns and 1 king for the player( with white or black pieces). From the above table(1) we can deduce that for the sequence of (2k +1)x (2k +1) chess games, k a positive integer, the number of Knights, resp. Bishops and Queens used are given by:

X = ( 2s Bishops, resp Knights and 0 Queen) if k is odd, greater than 2, and s is a positive integer.
Y = (2m Bishops, resp Knights and 2 Queens) if k is even greater than 2, and m is a positive integer

The castling follows the equality:

Small Castling: King moves 2q squares, q is a positive integer, and the Rook moves 2 squares.

Great Castling: King moves 1 square and the Rook moves 2d squares, d is a positive integer.

k Chess # BISHOPS # Knights #Queens # PAWNS .............................................................. ...............................................................

Now, for each positive integer k, there are two Rooks, k pawns and 1 king for the player( with white or black pieces). From the above table(1) we can deduce that for the sequence of (2k+1) x (2k+1) chess games, k a positive integer, the number of Knights, resp Bishops and Queens used are given by:

X =( 2s Bishops, resp Knights and 0 Queen) if k is Odd and greater than 2, and s is a positive integer
Y = (2m Bishops, resp Knights and 2 Queens) if k is even and greater than 2, and m is a positive integer.

The castling follows the equality:

Small Castling: King moves 2q squares, q is a positive integer, and the Rook moves 2 squares.

Great Castling: King moves 1 square and the Rook moves 2d squares, d is positive integer.

By applying the same approach of the sequence of the (2k+1) x (2k+1) chess games to the 2k x 2k chess games, where k is a positive integer difeerent from the powers of two, we can derive the following chess games, some of which were already established (the 10x10 chess, 12x12 chess and the 14x14 chess games). However, the approach we use here is different and, I believe that the study of sequences of chess games ( 2k x 2k, (2k+1) x (2k+1) and 2k x 2k chess games) were not studied as a whole.

Now, let consider the sequence of 2k x 2k chess games:

For k=3, we have the 2x3 x 2x3 chess game, or the 6x6 chess game. The initial arrangement of pieces(pawns) is as follows:

BOARD(1)

In this chess game, each player has 2 pawns, 2 Knights, 1 Firzan and 1 King.

The pawn moves and captures as the pawn of the 8x8 chess. The prise en passant is valid.

When promoted, it can be a knight, a firzan, or a pawn. The knight moves 1 square vertically and 1 square horizontally and vice-versa. The Firzan moves and captures one square diagonally.

The King moves and captures like the King of the 8x8 chess. There is no castling.

For k=5, we have the 2x5 x 2x5 chess game, or the 10 x 10 chess game. The initial arrangement of pieces pawns is as in the board(2). Each player has 2 Rooks, 4 knights, 2 Bishops, 1 King and 1 Queen and 10 pawns. At the start of the game, the Rook, Queen, Bishop and King move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. At the start of the game, the pawn can moves one, two or three squares at a time. The castlings are simply like the castling of the 8x8 chess game.


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BOARD(2)

For k=6, we have the 2x6 x 2x6 chess game, or the 12 x 12 chess game. The initial arrangement is as in board(3). Each player has 2 Rooks, 4 Knights, 4 Bishops, 1 Queen, 1 King and 12 pawns. The Rook, Bishop, Knight, Queen and King move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess game. However, the King has the option of moving one or two squares at a time.

At the start of the game, the Pawn has the option of moving one, two, three, four or 5 squares at a time. The prise en passant is valid. When promoted it can be any of the pieces or a pawn, except for the King. The castlings is as follows:

Small castling: The King on g1 moves to k1, and the Rook on l1 moves to i1 .

Great castling: The King on g1 moves f1, and the Rook on a1 moves to g1.


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BOARD(3)

For k=7, we have the 2x7 x 2x7 chess games, or the 14 x14 chess games. The initial arrangement of pieces (pawns) is as in board(4). Each player has 2 Rooks, 6 Knights, 4 Bishops, 1 Queen, 1 King and 14 pawns. At the start of the game, the pawn has the option of moving one, two, three, four, five or six squares at a time. The Rook, Bishop, Queen move and capture like those of the 8x8 chess games. The King can move one, two or three squares at a time. The castling is as follows;

Small castling: King on h1 moves to l1, and Rook on n1 moves to k1

Great castling: King on h1 moves to g1 and the Rook on a1 moves to h1.


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BOARD(4)

For k=9, we have the 2x9 x 2x9 chess game, or the 18 x18 chess game. Without drawing the 18 x18 chess board we can deduce from the preceding 2k x2k chess boards, that each player will have 2 Rooks, 6 Knights, 6 Bishops, 1 Queen, 1 King and 18 pawns.

Etc...

Probably, I will leave it to the reader to devise the following 2k x 2k chess games for k greater than 9.


Written by: A. Missoum. Edited by Hans Bodlaender; graphics for first five boards by David Howe.
WWW page created: April 2, 1997. Last modified: January 12, 1998.
The html-file was obtained from a document in Wordperfect, which was first converted to Word, and then from Word to html. Both conversions may have introduced errors, apologies for this. Also, Microsoft Explorer might display the tables in a wrong way - Netscape Explorer seems not to have this problem. 
Sours: https://www.chessvariants.com/large.dir/oddchess.html

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