Is gs 13 good

Is gs 13 good DEFAULT

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In 2021, federal employees received a 1.0% across-the-board increase and no adjustment to locality pay.

Also, What GS level is a masters degree?

GS Levels by Education

GS-1 No high school diploma
GS-7 Bachelor’s degree plus 1 year of full-time graduate study
GS-9 (GS-11 for some research positions) Master’s degree or 2 years of full-time graduate study
GS-9 Law degree (J.D. or LL.B.)

Considering this, How much does a GS-13 get paid?

GS-13 is typically a team lead position with around 10 people directly below them. Starting salary for a GS-13 employee is $79,468.00 per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $103,309.00 per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-13 employee is $38.08 per hour1.

How much does a GS-12 get paid?

Starting salary for a GS-12 employee is $66,829.00 per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $86,881.00 per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-12 employee is $32.02 per hour1.

Hereof, How much does a GS 15 make in retirement? How much does a GS 15 make in retirement? The starting salary for a GS-15 employee is $ 109,366.00 per annum in Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $ 142,180.00 per annum in Step 10. The base salary per hour for a Step employee 1 GS-15 is $ 52.40 per hour1.

Can I get a GS job after military?

There is almost an invisible pipeline from the military to federal employment. Federal jobs are open to all qualified applicants, of course, but service members have an edge because they often get those qualifications during their military careers.

What military rank is a GS-12 equivalent to?

Military and Civilian Pay Grades

Military Grade Rank Civilian Grade
O-5 Commander GS/GM-13/14
O-4 Lieutenant Commander GS-12
O-3 Lieutenant GS-11
O-2 Lieutenant Junior Grade GS-7/9

Is GS-13 good?

D. GS-13 is the 13th paygrade in the General Schedule (GS) payscale, the payscale used to determine the salaries of most civilian government employees. The GS-13 pay grade is generally reserved for top-level positions such as supervisors, high-level technical specialists, and top professionals holding advanced degrees.

What is a GS-13 equivalent to?

Equivalent Civilian to Military Ranks

Civilian Grade Military Rank Army Title
GS-11, GS-12 O-3 Captain
GS-13 O-4 Major
GS-14 O-5 Lieutenant Colonel
GS-15 O-6 Colonel

Can you be a GS-13 without degree?

No you do not need a degree. Just make sure you have your 8570 certs. I have seen plenty of 13’s without degrees, but it also depends on where you are. In DC a 13 is basically a lower level position where in Podunk USA, a 13 may be the director of an agency.

What do the steps mean in GS pay?

Within-grade increases (WGIs) or step increases are periodic increases in a GS employee’s rate of basic pay from one step of the grade of his or her position to the next higher step of that grade.

How much does a GS-15 get paid?

Starting salary for a GS-15 employee is $109,366.00 per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $142,180.00 per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-15 employee is $52.40 per hour1.

What is the average pension of a federal employee?

The average civilian federal employee who retired in FY 2016 was 61.5 years old and had completed 26.8 years of federal service. he average monthly annuity payment to workers who retired under CSRS in FY 2018 was $4,973. Workers who retired under FERS received an average monthly annuity of $1,834.

What military rank is a GS 12 equivalent to?

Military and Civilian Pay Grades

Military Grade Rank Civilian Grade
O-5 Commander GS/GM-13/14
O-4 Lieutenant Commander GS-12
O-3 Lieutenant GS-11
O-2 Lieutenant Junior Grade GS-7/9

Can I retire after 25 years of service?

Those under FERS also may retire at any age with 25 years of such service. Under CSRS/CSRS Offset, they also must have been under CSRS coverage for one out of the last two years before retirement. There is no such requirement under FERS.

What military rank is a GS 14 equivalent to?

Equivalent Civilian to Military Ranks

Civilian Grade Military Rank Army Title
GS-14 O-5 Lieutenant Colonel
GS-15 O-6 Colonel
SES Level V O-7 Brigadier General
SES Level IV O-8 Major General

Is it hard to get a GS job?

Many people believe applying for a federal job is a difficult and complicated process, but it is actually very achievable. The job search process in the federal government can last about 6-18 months, which can be lengthy for many people.

What is a GS 9 equivalent to in the military?

For example, a GS-9 is considered comparable to a first lieutenant or lieutenant (junior grade) (O-2), while a GS-15 (top of the General Schedule) is the equivalent grade of a colonel or captain (O-6).

Do GS employees outrank military?

The short answer is no. Civilians cannot outrank military personnel. The long answer is sort of. Government employees fall under what is called the GS system.

What army rank is equivalent to GS 11?

Equivalent Civilian to Military Ranks

Civilian Grade Military Rank Army Title
GS-10 O-2 First Lieutenant
GS-11, GS-12 O-3 Captain
GS-13 O-4 Major
GS-14 O-5 Lieutenant Colonel

What is a GS-15 equivalent to in the military?

For example, a GS-9 is considered comparable to a first lieutenant or lieutenant (junior grade) (O-2), while a GS-15 (top of the General Schedule) is the equivalent grade of a colonel or captain (O-6).

Is it hard to get a GS 13 job?

If you are an IT Specialist, GS-13, is generally the hardest grade to obtain. The reason for this is because the journeyman level for IT Specialist is the GS-12. If I remember correctly roughly 46% of all IT Specialists are at the GS-12 level but only 12% are GS-13; 5% at the GS-14; and 2% are at the GS-15 level.

Is it hard to get a GS 11 job?

Very broad positions (GS 11/12 or lower) are so hard because of the sheer volume of applicants.

Is GS 13 a high position?

The GS-13 pay grade is generally reserved for top-level positions such as supervisors, high-level technical specialists, and top professionals holding advanced degrees. Positions at GS-13 and above are known as Career Competitive.

gs 11 pay scale 2009

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Washington DC Locality Area – General Schedule Localities

GS Grade Step 1 Step 8
GS-12 $87,198 $107,548
GS-13 $103,690 $127,885
GS-14 $122,530 $151,118
GS-15 $144,128 $172,500*

Simply so, How much does a GS-13 get paid?

GS-13 is typically a team lead position with around 10 people directly below them. Starting salary for a GS-13 employee is $79,468.00 per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $103,309.00 per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-13 employee is $38.08 per hour1.

Similarly, Is GS 13 good?

D. GS-13 is the 13th paygrade in the General Schedule (GS) payscale, the payscale used to determine the salaries of most civilian government employees. The GS-13 pay grade is generally reserved for top-level positions such as supervisors, high-level technical specialists, and top professionals holding advanced degrees.

What military rank is a GS 13 equivalent to?

Military and Civilian Pay Grades

Military Grade Rank Civilian Grade
O-5 Commander GS/GM-13/14
O-4 Lieutenant Commander GS-12
O-3 Lieutenant GS-11
O-2 Lieutenant Junior Grade GS-7/9

Furthermore, Can you be a GS 13 without degree?
No you do not need a degree. Just make sure you have your 8570 certs. I have seen plenty of 13’s without degrees, but it also depends on where you are. In DC a 13 is basically a lower level position where in Podunk USA, a 13 may be the director of an agency.

Is GS-13 hard to get?

If you are an IT Specialist, GS-13, is generally the hardest grade to obtain. The reason for this is because the journeyman level for IT Specialist is the GS-12. If I remember correctly roughly 46% of all IT Specialists are at the GS-12 level but only 12% are GS-13; 5% at the GS-14; and 2% are at the GS-15 level.

Is it hard to get a GS 11 job?

Very broad positions (GS 11/12 or lower) are so hard because of the sheer volume of applicants.

Is a GS-13 high?

About Grade GS-13

GS-13 is the most common grade in the General Schedule Pay System. GS-13 is highest grade for many career tracks in the federal government.

Do GS employees outrank military?

The short answer is no. Civilians cannot outrank military personnel. The long answer is sort of. Government employees fall under what is called the GS system.

What GS position is equivalent military?

Equivalent Civilian to Military Ranks

Civilian Grade Military Rank Army Title
GS-9 O-1 Second Lieutenant
GS-10 O-2 First Lieutenant
GS-11, GS-12 O-3 Captain
GS-13 O-4 Major

What GS level is the president?

SES positions are considered to be above the GS-15 level of the General Schedule, and below Level III of the Executive Schedule. Career members of the SES ranks are eligible for the Presidential Rank Awards program. Up to 10% of SES positions can be filled as political appointments rather than by career employees.

Is GS-11 entry level?

To qualify for jobs at the GS-7 grade (or equivalent) level and higher, you must have specialized experience. … To qualify for jobs at the GS-9 grade (or equivalent) level you need a master’s degree, and for the GS-11 grade (or equivalent) level you need a doctoral degree.

Can I get a GS job after military?

There is almost an invisible pipeline from the military to federal employment. Federal jobs are open to all qualified applicants, of course, but service members have an edge because they often get those qualifications during their military careers.

Is GS-9 entry level?

Education Req’s

The GS-9 pay grade is generally held by white-collar employees in mid-level positions. GS-9 is the starting grade for most employees directly out of school who have a Master’s Degree or several years of experience in their field.

How long does it take to go from GS-12 to GS 13?

I think it should take only about a year to go from 12 to 13 if your positions tops out at 13. I joined the federal work force as a GS-12 (full performance level)and now am a GS-13. The difference is that I had to apply and compete for the position with others. This all happened within two years.

How do you qualify for GS 13?

Basic Requirements for GS-13 and Above

At least 1 year of that experience must have been specialized experience at or equivalent to work at the next lower level of the position, and must have provided the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform successfully the work of the position.

What is highest GS level?

The General Schedule (GS) is the predominant pay scale for federal employees, especially employees in professional, technical, administrative or clerical positions. The system consists of 15 grades, from GS-1, the lowest level, to GS-15, the highest level. There are also 10 steps within each grade.

What’s higher than a GS-15?

The next pay scale above GS-15 is known as Senior Level Service (SES) and is reserved for high level executive positions are the government’s more renowned researchers. GS-15 pay is capped at level V of the Executive Schedule.

Can you negotiate a GS salary?

It is possible to negotiate a higher federal salary, provided you have some basic information about government pay scales. Each government job has a salary range defined by steps within a pay grade. … If the salary range is $43,000 to $50,000, you should have no problem getting $44,000 or even $48,000 for this job.

What is higher than a GS-15?

The next pay scale above GS-15 is known as Senior Level Service (SES) and is reserved for high level executive positions are the government’s more renowned researchers. GS-15 pay is capped at level V of the Executive Schedule.

What does a GS 7 get paid?

Starting salary for a GS-7 employee is $37,674.00 per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $48,978.00 per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-7 employee is $18.05 per hour1. The table on this page shows the base pay rates for a GS-7 employee.

What is a GS 11 equivalent to?

Equivalent Civilian to Military Ranks

Civilian Grade Military Rank Army Title
GS-11, GS- 12 O-3 Captain
GS-13 O-4 Major
GS-14 O-5 Lieutenant Colonel
GS-15 O-6 Colonel

What military rank is a GS-14 equivalent to?

Equivalent Civilian to Military Ranks

Civilian Grade Military Rank Army Title
GS-14 O-5 Lieutenant Colonel
GS-15 O-6 Colonel
SES Level V O-7 Brigadier General
SES Level IV O-8 Major General

What is a GS 9 equivalent to in the military?

For example, a GS-9 is considered comparable to a first lieutenant or lieutenant (junior grade) (O-2), while a GS-15 (top of the General Schedule) is the equivalent grade of a colonel or captain (O-6).

Is it hard to get a GS job?

Many people believe applying for a federal job is a difficult and complicated process, but it is actually very achievable. The job search process in the federal government can last about 6-18 months, which can be lengthy for many people.

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One of the themes I have written about over the years is the idea that the federal workforce is too varied and diverse to try to make one-size-fits-all programs for the entire workforce. It is a principal reason that measures like OPM’s 80-day hiring model don’t work.

When we look at the differences between agencies or occupations or geographic locations, we find that the experience of one group of federal workers may bear little resemblance to that of another group.

Those of us who have worked in the DC area and in the field can attest to the profound differences between being a federal employee in DC and being a federal employee in Florida, or Ohio, or California, or just about anywhere else.

Some of that difference is the headquarters v. field divide. I have heard both headquarters and field folks complaining about the other, saying they have no idea how things really are.

Field folks tend to think headquarters people just get in the way, while headquarters people think field folks have no understanding of how policy making works, what it is like to deal with Congress, or even with the senior officials in their own agency.

All of those are partly  true, wrapping biases and misperceptions in a kernel of truth. But they are such sweeping statements that they don’t hold up under closer examination.

Types of Jobs

One area where there is significant difference is the type of jobs we see. In DC, the grade levels are much higher, leading to higher pay.

As you can see in the following table, the average pay of feds in DC* is more than $31,000 higher than the overall federal workforce. It is more than $35,000 higher than feds in Florida and Georgia, and more than $39,000 than those in North Carolina.

There is an obvious explanation why that is so – Washington, DC is the seat of government and OPM classification standards give greater credit to headquarters jobs that drive agency policy.

That does not explain why non-headquarters jobs in the DC area tend to be one or two grade levels higher than their counterparts in the field. Competition for scarce talent is the most likely cause of that discrepancy.

Image of a table showing data comparing federal employees by grade level and salary in Washington, DC to a sampling of states

Another difference is the percentage of trade and craft jobs outside of DC. Roughly 10 percent of federal jobs are blue collar, while only 2 percent in DC are. Those jobs tend to pay less than general schedule and other white collar jobs series.

Supervisory Ratios

Another difference is in supervisory ratios. Even though grade levels are much higher in DC than in the rest of the country, the number of supervisors per employee is almost twice the number in Ohio, Georgia, or any other state.

The difference is partly caused by the type of work in the field. We typically see more jobs that are done in larger teams. In DC, we see smaller work units that are more specialized.

LocalitySupervisory Ratio
DC1:5.3
Florida1:9.0
California1:10.8
Georgia1:9.6
Ohio1:9.5
Pennsylvania1:9.3
New York1:9.6
North Carolina1:10.1
Washington1:8.0

The fact that there are good reasons for the differences in grade levels, types of work, pay and the number of supervisors does not make the effect of those differences any less important. Being in an organization where 55 percent of the employees are GS-13, 14, 15 or SES is much different from one where only 12 percentare at those levels. The same applies when you work in a town where the majority of the total workforce are either federal employees or federal contractors.

I spent 10 years working in Jacksonville, Florida. The Navy was the biggest employer in town, due to having 3 Navy bases. Even so, most people were not involved with the Navy or the federal government. That difference changes the mindset of the federal workers, because the town did not live and breathe government.

Another big difference in field locations is the expectation of promotions. In the DC area, getting promoted to GS-13, 14 or 15 is far easier, because half the jobs are at those grades. In the field, where only 1 in 10 jobs are GS-13s and only 1 or 2 in 100 are GS-15s, the expectation of where a career might top out is different. Getting to GS-13 is a big deal.

Other Differences

There are some other big differences.

In the field it is uncommon to find anyone who has testified before Congress, or who has worked with the agency head and most senior officials. In DC that is not such a big deal.

When we talk about the federal workforce, all of these differences are important. What might be important for the GS-9 in the field may be of no interest to the DC federal worker, and vice versa. That isn’t bad, it is just reality.

Those who try to lump all federal workers into one big pot are doing a disservice to federal workers and are probably not doing themselves any favors either. The politician who fed bashes because s/he is taking potshots at the GS-15s and SESers in DC is also talking about the GS-11 in the field who does not get involved in policy and other DC-oriented tasks.

We would all be better off if we recognize the differences and the similarities between DC and field employees. I’m not optimistic that we will see that any time soon.

* Data for the entire national capital region is much harder to come by, so this information includes the District of Columbia only. Because a significant number of federal employees in the NCR are in Maryland and Northern Virginia, state level totals for those states are not included.

This column was originally published on Jeff Neal's blog, ChiefHRO.com, and has been reposted here with permission from the author. Visit ChiefHRO.com to read more of Jeff's articles regarding federal human resources and other current events along with his insights on reforming the HR system.

© 2021 Jeff Neal. All rights reserved. This article may not be reproduced without express written consent from Jeff Neal.

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About the Author

Jeff Neal is author of the blog ChiefHRO.com and was previously the chief human capital officer at the Homeland Security Department and the chief human resources officer at the Defense Logistics Agency.

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Boogie Down Productions‎ - 13 And Good (LP Version)

 

Old10-30-2016, 01:40 PM
 

Location: Central New Jersey

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Was very easy when I got hired back in 1991. Retired a few months ago at the age of 46. That was the perk going in. I knew after 25 years I could just walk away with a very nice monthly pension and free medical benefits.

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Old10-30-2016, 01:44 PM
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by joee5View Post

Was very easy when I got hired back in 1991. Retired a few months ago at the age of 46. That was the perk going in. I knew after 25 years I could just walk away with a very nice monthly pension and free medical benefits.

That was before the Feds became the employer of choice. Most candidates shunned it because of lower pay. But maximum security and great retirement are things young people often ignore.
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Old10-30-2016, 02:45 PM
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by selharsView Post

More than 23 years in the field (with the right experience) and a Master's Degree. I was more than qualified. In the private sector I just think there's less institutional BS, that's all.

A coworker told me a friend of his pulled a job announcement, rather than give it to a less unqualified vet because of points. Is that hearsay, just an anecdote? I believe it.

I don't know your specific situation, but a lot of private sector think they are qualified for GS13 or higher because of their income, but in reality most likely only qualify at the 11/12 level. There are just so many misconceptions about GS pay and work expectations. Now days it's a bit easier to get in at the 13 level because the pay scale is so out of whack with the market that jobs are getting artificially graded higher than normal just to have competitive pay. But esp back in the early 90s, a GS13 was a career pinnacle, not an entry job.


What I tell folks is to get a rough comparison, is subtract $20-$30K from your current salary and that is roughly the GS grade equivalent. Now like I mentioned, we are seeing some agencies start to grade high just to get the pay up to market because of that big lag between the GS scale and market rates.
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Old10-30-2016, 08:18 PM
 

Location: here

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Eevee17View Post

The thing about landing any kind of government job is you're competing against people who have a connection. Even if you do eventually get the job, you're always going to the lowman on the totem pole. If lay offs come around, you're more likely to get cut than say so and so's daughter even if she recently started. I live in NJ. The only advice I would give is if you have no connections is do volunteer work, such as campaigning. However, if you do that it will limit where you work and who you work for. I.e don't volunteer in Town X and expect that to get you a government job in Town Y.

None of this is true.

How would campaigning help you get a government job? I've worked local govt for a long time and we do not talk about politics in the office. My work has nothing to do with politics, and if I campaigned for anyone or anything, no one at work would even know.
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Old10-31-2016, 12:29 PM
 

81 posts, read 67,653 times

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Eevee17View Post

The thing about landing any kind of government job is you're competing against people who have a connection. Even if you do eventually get the job, you're always going to the lowman on the totem pole. If lay offs come around, you're more likely to get cut than say so and so's daughter even if she recently started. I live in NJ. The only advice I would give is if you have no connections is do volunteer work, such as campaigning. However, if you do that it will limit where you work and who you work for. I.e don't volunteer in Town X and expect that to get you a government job in Town Y.

So not true. As I posted earlier, I got my job through an honors program. I didn't know anyone in government when I applied. I also didn't have connections at the other agencies that offered me a position.
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Old11-01-2016, 01:14 AM
 

Location: Los Angeles CA

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I work for the government I been here a long time now
But I got this job because they were looking for college students to hire as paid interns and they got me
For IT especially it seems some guys rather work for the private sector than public sector.

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Old11-01-2016, 01:19 AM
 

Location: Los Angeles CA

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pvande55View Post

That was before the Feds became the employer of choice. Most candidates shunned it because of lower pay. But maximum security and great retirement are things young people often ignore.

Don't forget
Government jobs and Federal jobs treat you like a human being
Unlike most of the private sector that treats you like a robot
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Old11-01-2016, 10:54 AM
 

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You are going to have a very hard time breaking into the feds as GS-13. Most feds don't reach that level throughout their careers.

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Old11-01-2016, 01:43 PM
 

Location: Chicago, IL

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Quote:

Originally Posted by treemoniView Post

You are going to have a very hard time breaking into the feds as GS-13. Most feds don't reach that level throughout their careers.

This isn't an absolute truth. Like everything in life, it depends. If you have an advance degree (i.e. PhD or similar advanced health-related degree or policy-related degree) along with experience related to the posted job, you should be relatively competitive at the GS 13 level or potentially higher depending on your experience, for federal jobs at the right agencies (STEM related). The fact that the federal government receives so many applications is where the difficulty comes in and has nothing to do with the GS 13 level. In fact the higher the level, you can argue that it is easier to get in because people will self-select themselves out or will be eliminated due to lack of experience.

Even if you have lots of experience, it's just competitive to get in from the outside. If you're well qualified for an upper GS position (13 or higher), your best bet is to apply to positions with "few" or "many" vacancies. Along with making sure your resume is strong and in proper "federal government format." The more specific the position/job duties (which are usually the upper GS positions), sometimes the easier if you have an advanced degree and related experience (although insiders still have a leg up). Very broad positions (GS 11/12 or lower) are so hard because of the sheer volume of applicants.
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Old11-01-2016, 02:42 PM
 

Location: Fort Benton, MT

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I'd like to make a comment as a current federal employee. The Fed's have moved to an entirely automated grading system for applications. A computer program scans your resume and looks for "key words" that HR has selected. The more you have, the higher you rise up the scale. Once this has been completed, you are then given "points" for veterans status, education, and experience. The top 5 per position are then placed on a best qualified list, and sent to the selecting official for interviews. So it doesn't matter how many people apply, only the top 5 move on. This process was implemented to take humans and potential bias out of the hiring process.


Now, most Fed employees at the higher end are underpaid. Scientists, lawyers, CPA's, doctors, nurses, etc. Blue collar workers make more than the private sector. This is due to the stringent background checks. For instance, a janitor in a V.A. hospital will start a $12.00 an hour. Much more than a private sector employee. However, if that janitor gets a D.U.I., he will loose his job. Private sector, not a problem. On the other end, doctors for the V.A. get paid anywhere from 120k to 230k a year, based on specialty. Those same doctors could be earning double that in the private sector. I have worked with cancer doctors who are paid 380k a year, at small community hospitals. They could never earn that amount in government.


Where the numbers go out of the window is in law enforcement. Federal law enforcement officers get paid huge salaries. It is because of them, and the DOD, that the federal pay gets skewed. Senior federal agents earn over 100K a year. Supervisors get into the 120's. Many civilian DOD jobs earn over 100k a year.


In my current position, the top pay is 65k. I would have to get into management to get above that, and I would have to be a senior level manager to ever get above 100k. However in the private sector, I would have a base rate of pay plus commissions for working in the finance industry. So I am earning less.


I would like to add however, that if you are disabled, government jobs are superior. That is why I continue to work for uncle sam. Federal law REQUIRES that they accommodate me, and I am protected. In the private sector, I could be fired for having too many doctors appointments, or taking too long to get back from the bathroom, etc.

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13 good gs is

How long does it take to become a GS-14?

To qualify for a position at the GS-14 level, you must have a minimum of one year of experience at the GS-13 level. Depending on the position, candidates may be able to substitute education for some of the required experience. Job titles for GS-14 employees include the following: Administrative officer.

How hard is it to get a GS-13 job?

You are going to have a very hard time breaking into the feds as GS-13. Most feds don’t reach that level throughout their careers. You are going to have a very hard time breaking into the feds as GS-13. Most feds don’t reach that level throughout their careers.

How long does it take to get to GS-13?

Another year of good performance and recommendation would get you your GS-11, another year to pick up 12 and then finally another year of good performance to make GS-13 and be at the full performance level of your position. So 4 years altogether if you start as a college grad GS-7.

Can a GS 12 apply for a GS-14 position?

Is is possible to be considered and hired for a GS-14 from a GS-12 after 1 or 2 years in the GS-12 position without being on a GS-13 role.

How long does it take to go from GS 11 to GS-12?

At least 1 year of your specialized experience must be equivalent to the next lower grade level. For example, to qualify for a GS-12 grade (or equivalent) level, you must have a minimum of 1 year of specialized experience equivalent to a GS-11 grade (or equivalent) level.

How much does a GS-12 MAKE per hour?

Starting salary for a GS-12 employee is $/b> per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $/b> per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-12 employee is $31.70 per hour1. The table on this page shows the base pay rates for a GS-12 employee.

Is GS-9 entry level?

Education Req’s The GS-9 pay grade is generally held by white-collar employees in mid-level positions. GS-9 is the starting grade for most employees directly out of school who have a Master’s Degree or several years of experience in their field.

How much is a Grade 9 salary?

Starting salary for a GS-9 employee is $/b> per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $/b> per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-9 employee is $21.86 per hour1.

What GS level is entry level?

GS-7

What does a GS-11 get paid?

The GS-11 pay grade is generally held by white-collar employees in mid-level positions. Starting salary for a GS-11 employee is $per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-11 employee is $26.45 per hour1.

How much does a GS-15 get paid?

GS-15 pay is capped at level V of the Executive Schedule. Starting salary for a GS-15 employee is $/b> per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $/b> per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-15 employee is $52.40 per hour1.

How much does a GS 13 get paid?

Starting salary for a GS-13 employee is $/b> per year at Step 1, with a maximum possible base pay of $/b> per year at Step 10. The hourly base pay of a Step 1 GS-13 employee is $37.70 per hour1.

How much does a GS 13 make in retirement?

If he retires with 30 years of service, his FERS basic retirement will provide 30 percent of his high-three average salary. He’s been at the GS 13-10 level for the past three years. His current salary is $113,007.

What is the average pension of a federal employee?

The average monthly annuity among civilian federal employees who retired under CSRS in FY2018 was $4,973, whereas new FERS annuitants received an average annuity of $1,834 per month.

How much does a GS-12 make in retirement?

The pay for a GS-12, Step 10, Rest of US, is $95,388 in 2018. Using that as the high-3, and with 30 years and under age 62, that equates to an annuity of $28,616 ($25,754 with survivor benefit). At age 62 or more, it would be $31,478 ($28,330).

Is it worth buying back my military time?

Another benefit to buying back military time is that in addition to the higher retirement pension, you may be eligible to retire sooner. So if you’re right on the ‘cusp’ of being eligible to retire – buying back your military time might make you eligible to retire sooner than you had thought.

How much does it cost to buy your military time?

But, if they make the decision to buy back their military time of 5 years of honorable service, they’re estimated pension will be $2,085 per month (an increase of $297 per month). If we factor in the assumption of living to the age of 90, that adds an additional $99,972 to their total lifetime pension earnings.

How many years of military service can I buy back?

three years

What does it mean to buy your military time back?

The Military Buyback Program is a benefit for all veterans with active duty military service time to receive credit for their military service time to be added to their years of civil service with the government and increases their retirement annuity.

Should I buy years of service?

The main benefit of buying back time is that upon retirement, it appears that the employee worked more years than they actually did. For example, if someone worked 22-years, but buys back 3-years, then their final pension calculation uses 25-years as the basis to calculate the annual pension amount.

How many years do you have to work for the federal government to get a pension?

5 years

What is the federal retirement plan?

FERS is a retirement plan that provides benefits from three different sources: a Basic Benefit Plan, Social Security and the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP). Then, after you retire, you receive annuity payments each month for the rest of your life.

Can I retire with 20 years of federal service?

Under the CSRS, CSRS Offset and FERS systems, it is the employee’s option to retire after reaching minimum age and service requirements. Under CSRS/CSRS Offset, and employee may retire at age 62 with five years of service, 60 with 20, or 55 with 30.

Can I retire after 5 years of federal service?

If you have less than five years of creditable civilian federal service, you’re not eligible for retirement. You can choose to take a refund of your Federal Employees Retirement System contributions. If you have five or more years of service, you’re eligible for a deferred retirement benefit later.

Can I retire after 25 years of service?

Early Retirement Benefits: 25-and-Out Early retirement benefits under the 25-and-Out provision allow you to retire early with reduced lifetime retirement benefits. You must have at least 25 years of service to qualify. The benefit factors for 25-and-Out are based on your years of service and range from 2.2% to 2.4%.

How much money do I need to retire at 55?

Experts say to have at least seven times your salary saved at age 55. That means if you make $55,000 a year, you should have at least $385,000 saved for retirement. Keep in mind that life is unpredictable–economic factors, medical care, how long you live will also impact your retirement expenses.

Can you retire after 10 years of work?

Since you can earn 4 credits per year, you need at least 10 years of work that subject to Social Security to become eligible for Social Security retirement benefits.

Sours: https://www.mvorganizing.org/how-long-does-it-take-to-become-a-gs-14/
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