Raptor 400 quad

Raptor 400 quad DEFAULT

SHOOTOUT: Yamaha Raptor 700 vs. YFZ450 Special Editions

When it comes to the current state of sport-quad supremacy, Yamaha just might have the market on lockdown. The fuel-injected YFZ450R is pretty much race-ready off the showroom floor, and the EFI-fed Raptor 700 is the only other current big-bore sport quad worth mentioning. These ATVs have proven themselves in nearly every discipline of ATV riding and racing, but if your thing happens to be the sand, the Yamahas are even more of a no-brainer. While Suzuki and Kawasaki are out, and Honda is still pushing the same exact bike it brought us in 2006, Yamaha has continued to invest in improvements year after year. We recently spent a few days with Yamaha in the dunes to really compare these two machines and try to help our readers make that ultra-important decision: 450-class leader or big bore?

Which is the better all-around sport ATV for dunes, trails and tracks, the Yamaha Raptor 700R or the Yamaha YFZ450R? To find out, we compared the Special Edition of each machine at Glamis and the surrounding desert.

HOW DOES COST COMPARE?
If we’re talking apples to apples with the YFZ-R SE and the 700R SE, it’s only a 200-dollar difference in favor of the Raptor. Both machines come with EFI, upgraded aluminum parts, graphics, etc., and they both also come with truly highend, fully adjustable KYB shocks. The difference lies in the front end. If you plan on track or desert riding, you will really appreciate the wider, long-travel front end on the YFZ-R, as it will cost $1000–$2000 to replicate it on the 700. If you’re looking for a lower overall entry point, the standard Raptor 700 can be had for $1100 less than the base YFZ450R, but it is definitely stripped down in terms of suspension quality and accessories. The Raptor 700 is $7699, the 700R is $8199, and the 700R SE is $8799. The YFZ450R is $8799, and the Special Edition is $8999.

WHAT’S NEW FOR 2015?
While the YFZ450R has basically been untouched since 2014, the Raptor 700 received a laundry list of solid upgrades. Yamaha has stuck to its strategy of releasing a great product and then refining it to near perfection over the model run. Apparently, being the most powerful sport quad on the market wasn’t enough; Yamaha engineers pulled 10 percent more horsepower out of the Raptor’s 686cc engine. Compression was increased from 9.2:1 to 10:1, and the engineers completely redesigned the cylinder head. The new head features a completely new single-port exhaust design and an exhaust system to work with it. New cam timing, fuelinjection mapping and a different rod will help the Raptor rev quicker and make more power while still retaining reliability and that super-smooth all-around power curve.

On the exterior, the new Raptor gets a taller 22-inch front tire designed to shift the Raptor’s weight rearward. This improved weight bias works hand in hand with new suspension settings, optimizing traction for the power increase. Shock changes include a 5mm-longer rear spring that increases feel and comfort through the rough and the whoops. The DID T-ring chain was also replaced by the same ultra-durable DID X-ring chain that many of us have been upgrading to for years.

A much taller engine gives the Raptor 700R a roomier layout, and it has a more sedate 10.1:1 compression ratio. The long-stroke engine revs out to 9000 rpm and has dual counterbalancers for less vibration. New 22-inch Maxxis front tires help it float over dune chop and trail garbage.

WHICH YAMAHA IS FASTER?
In an all-out drag race, the biggerbore Raptor 700 is faster. The quicker revving YFZ-R will get out of the hole quicker, but the massive torque and taller gearing of the 700 will slowly walk away from the race-ready 450. When it comes to climbing the biggest hills, the Raptor offers a similar advantage. China Wall, the biggest and steepest dune in Glamis, was chosen for the comparison. With a little run-in and a competent rider, both machines could conquer the beast with ease. The Raptor, however, could start right at the base, whereas the YFZ-R needed a little extra run at it. Climbing “The Wall” also required a bit more clutch work on the 450, while the 700 could pretty much lug up it in third and fourth. If you missed a shift and had to abort your climb, the YFZ-R was the machine you wanted to be on. The lower-slung, wider YFZ-R platform proved much easier to whip around on a steep dune face than the taller, skinnier Raptor. This can really prove advantageous when “turning around” is 500 feet up a very steep dune or hill-climb.

The YFZ450R has a 449cc displacement with 95mm piston, 63.4mm stroke and massive 11.8:1 compression ratio. It’s 48.8 inches wide, has a low center of gravity and sports a steering stem with our positioned handlebar mounts to suit a wide variety of riders. Plastic is designed for maximum body English.

WHICH HAS BETTER DELIVERY?
Power delivery is great with both machines. The harder-hitting YFZ-R power curve is very easy to ride aggressively, but the big torque and super-smooth power curve on the Raptor make it easy to ride in any circumstance. As for overall jetting or “tuning,” we noticed a slight hiccup off the bottom on the YFZ-R, but the Raptor performed flawlessly throughout the entire curve. Tighter emissions standards have called for leaner and leaner fuel mapping. The Raptor seemed unfazed, but we noticed it on the YFZ-R. It exhibited a slightly lean condition at basically zero elevation, but it will undoubtedly be less noticeable or go away at higher elevations.

The YFZ450R is 3.3 inches wider than the Raptor, and the seat height is 0.8 inch lower at 31.9 inches. Both Special Editions have high-end KYB piggyback shocks with separate high- and lowspeed compression adjusters and rebound and ring preload for the progressive-rate springs. The YFZ also has a quick-adjust clutch perch and Dzus fasteners for quick plastic removal
Out back the two sport Yamahas look alike, although the YFZ has almost an inch more rear travel and a wider axle. The YFZ also has a more track-ready, lower-profile, 20x10-9 rear Maxxis. The Raptor SE has black powdercoated aluminum heel guards, and the shock is re-tuned with slower rebound and more progressive compression damping.

WHAT ABOUT HANDLING?
The Raptor is the lazy man’s ride of choice. Everything happens at a little slower pace. Steering is a little slower and less abrupt, as is the slightly easier
to-ride power curve. The YFZ450R, on the other hand, handles better than any other stock machine we’ve ever ridden. Back in ’08–’09, the YFZ-R had the track-ready LT450R as a solid competitor for the overall best-handling sport machine, and shootouts between the two machines were very close and even closer in the handling department. It was a very tough call to pick a winner back then, but the YFZ-R has continued to progress and is a much better machine than it was in 2009. If you want the best-handling sport ATV you can buy off the showroom floor, buy a YFZ450R.

Both Yamahas have strong brakes with two-piston hydraulic front calipers, aggressive serrated footpegs and blacked-out rims. The YFZ450R has square-profile Maxxis meats for aggressive cornering, while the Raptor’s new 22-inch front tire is designed more for comfort and cruising.

WHICH HAS BETTER SUSPENSION?
Once again, the Raptor suspension is amazing for a lazier ride through the dunes or trails, but the performance of the YFZ-R is over the top. The Raptor, especially the 700R SE model, comes with very adjustable suspension that can be fine-tuned to please just about any rider. It’s plush and forgiving, yet will still soak up the bigger hits like G-outs and big jumps. Riding the YFZ450R is like riding a completely built race bike that doesn’t require the additional maintenance and extremely deep pockets of a full-aftermarket setup. The slightly stiffer spring setup will make slowspeed riding a little more abusive than on the Raptor, but you just can’t beat it when it comes to aggressive play riding or racing. The YFZ-R’s wider MX-track-width front end is an improvement in just about any type of riding. The wider platform increases stability, improves corner speed and also gives the machine more suspension travel. Unless you are riding in extremely tight woods, we can’t think of a situation where you would prefer the narrower front end and its handling characteristics over the wider YFZ450R’s front end.

The quick-revving, short-stroke engine has five titanium valves and tuning to produce a fun, fast and furious hit, along with strong mid and top power. It has a trick assist and slipper clutch that locks under power for better acceleration and helps the suspension soak up braking bumps.

WHICH IS BETTER IN DUNES?
The big-bore, big-power Raptor is a great overall duning machine, but it really depends on whom you ask. If your ideal trip to the dunes involves being in the saddle from sun up to sun down, the Raptor’s roomy chassis, smooth power curve and forgiving suspension will undoubtedly win you over. If your dune trips revolve around racing your buddies around worm tracks, jumping the biggest hits you can find, and all-around hauling the mail in every direction, then the YFZ-R is your machine. Once again, the YFZ-R is by far the most race-ready machine you can purchase, and all those traits are valuable to an aggressive dune rider. Rider height and overall body size might also have a lot to do with this decision. The Raptor is a big machine, and it truly fits the plus-size rider.

Anyone over 6-foot-1 might feel a little cramped on the YFZ-R, but the Raptor is incredibly roomy. A good friend, who happens to be a 6-foot-4, 330-pound ex-NFL lineman, rides the wheels off of his Raptor 700 but makes the YFZ-R look like a circus toy.

WHAT ABOUT TRACKS AND TRAILS?
Both machines are surprisingly good on tracks and trails. The Raptor may never use all its massive horsepower and taller gearing on an average trail ride, but it’s still very smooth and ridable off the bottom end. The 46-inch width is great on tighter trails, and the reverse gear can really come in handy. The big-bore Raptor is also surprisingly good on an MX track. While not really a match for the race-ready YFZ-R, it’s truly impressive. Jumping the Raptor is easier than you would think, and the smooth, massive power curve can get you over the biggest jumps with ease. As we’ve already stated, the race ready YFZ-R is the best track machine you can buy. It offers quality, low-slung, wider suspension; great power that revs to the moon; and the best overall MX handling in the business. All this track ready performance doesn’t necessarily ruin it for the trail, though. The YFZ-R comes with an all-around 21-inch and 20-inch tire setup that is decent on any track but gives you the clearance you need down the trail. The motor is snappy and a bit more aggressive than the Raptor’s, but its EFI system still keeps it manageable and rideable. If the trails are not too narrow, the YFZ-R is a blast to trail ride on, but it doesn’t have reverse and can be a handful when the trails get really tight.

Power is increased on the 700R by 10 percent with a new singleport exhaust, cam timing, higher-compression piston, connecting rod, balancer shaft, air-injection system and head work. Reverse gives the Raptor a big advantage in tight spots, but it doesn’t have a quickchange clutch cover like the YFZ.

WHAT ABOUT WRENCHING AND DURABILITY?
Both the Raptor and YFZ-R have proven to be very reliable. The earlier YFZ-Rs suffered from a few slight electrical gremlins, but they are about as solid as you can get now. The YFZ-R has also been designed around ease of maintenance, including easily removable plastic panels, a quick-change clutch cover, and rear fenders that can be removed without completely unhooking the battery and wiring. The Raptor does not have a quick-change clutch cover, and while its clutch has proven pretty durable, it is right at the heart of a whole lot of power transfer.

WHICH HAS STRONGER BRAKES?
The two Yamahas both have excellent brakes. While it would be hard to fault either of them, if we were required to pick a braking performance winner, it would have to be the lighter weight 450R. Both have excellent lever feel, can stop on a dime and share the super-trick, removable Yamaha parking brake lever.

WHAT’S OUR FINAL ANSWER?
With riders having different riding styles and body sizes, it is nearly impossible to pick an outright winner between these two machines. Our expert-level and younger test riders would opt for the YFZ-R every time, yet they couldn’t complain about its bigger brother, the Raptor 700R. The more experienced in our group felt the same way about the smoother and plusher ride of the Raptor. Both machines are great in the dunes, super fun on the trails and will surprise you on the track. If the track is your main venue, the choice is easily the raceready YFZ450R. But, if all-around riding enjoyment is more your thing, the choice is going to be a little more difficult.

R700vYFZ10_DY5T0005_2_

2015 YAMAHA 2015 YAMAHA
RAPTOR 700R SE YFZ450R SE
ENGINE/TRANSMISSION
Engine type Liquid-cooled, 4-valve, SOHC 4-stroke single ……………………..Liquid/oil-cooled, Ti 5-valve, DOHC 4-stroke
Displacement ………………………………………….686cc …………………………………………………………………. 449cc
Bore x stroke …………………………… 102.0 x 84.0mm ……………………………………………………95mm x 63.4mm
Compression ratio ……………………………….. 10.0:1:1 ………………………………………………………………….11.8:1
Lubrication system ……………………………… Dry sump ………………………………………………………………Dry sump
Induction ….EFI w/position sensor, 44mm throttle body …………………………………………………….42mm Mikuni EFI
Starting/back-up ………………Electric push-button/none ………………………………………… Electric push-button/none
Starting procedure ………… Engage clutch, push button ………………………………………… Turn on key and hit button
Air filter:
Type ………………………………… Washable oiled foam ……………………………………………………………………Foam
Access ….Remove seat, airbox lid (4 clips) & wingnut ……………. Release seat and 4 quick release; remove 1 bolt
Transmission ………………… Manual 5-speed w/reverse ………………………………………………. Fully manual 5-speed
Reverse procedure..1st gear, engage clutch, turn knob ………………………………………………………………….. None
on right fender, downshift
Transmission pattern …………………….. R-1-N-2-3-4-5 …………………………………………………………..1-N-2-3-4-5
Drive system …………………………………………….2WD ……………………………………………………………………2WD
Final drive …………………………………520 O-ring chain ……………………………………………………………………Chain
DIMENSIONS/CAPACITIES/WEIGHTS
Fuel capacity ………………………………………… 2.9 gal. ……………………………………………………………….. 2.6 gal.
Wheelbase ……………………………………………… 50.4” …………………………………………………………………….. 50”
Overall length/width/height …………..72.6”/45.5”/43.9” ………………………………………………….. 70.7”/48.8”/41.9”
Seat height …………………………………………….. 32.7” ………………………………………………………………….. 31.9”
Ground clearance ……………………………………….. 4.4” ……………………………………………………………………. 4.5”
Claimed wet weight ………………………………….422 lb. ……………………………………………….. 403 lb.; SE, 405 lb.
ROLLING CHASSIS
Frame …………………………… Hybrid aluminum & steel ……………………………………………… Steel/aluminum hybrid
Suspension/wheel travel:
Front ………….. Dual A-arms w/ prel.-adj. shocks/9.1” ……………………..Dual A-arms w/ adj. hi/lo comp./reb./prel.
piggyback shocks/9.8”
Rear ……………. Swingarm reb./prel.-adj. shock/10.1” …………………………Swingarm w/ adj. hi/lo comp./reb./prel.
piggyback shock/11.0”
Brakes/actuation:
Front ……. Two-piston hydraulic discs/right-hand lever …………………..Twin-piston hydraulic discs/ right-hand lever
Rear ……………………. Hydraulic disc, right-foot pedal …………………………………….Hydraulic disc/right-foot pedal
Parking ……………………… Lever lock on left-hand lever ………………………………………………….Left-hand lever/lock
Tires:
Front ……………………….AT 22×7-10 Maxxis M971Y ……………………………………………………..21×7-10 Maxxis
Rear ………………………..AT 20×10-9 Maxxis M976Y ……………………………………………………..21×7-10 Maxxis
DETAILS
Battery capacity …………………………………..8 amp/hr …………………………………………………………………….. N/A
Instruments … Neutral, reverse, coolant temp, low fuel …………………………………………………….Temp/fuel/neutral
Lighting:
Front ………..Two removable 30W Krypton headlights ……………………………………..Two 30W Krypton headlights
Rear ………………….. LED 0.5W/3.9W tail/brake light …………………………………….3.9/0.5W LED tail/brake light
Colors …………………………….Blue/white; SE black/red ………………………Blue, white w/ graphics kit; SE black/red
Minimum recommended operator age ……………….. 16 ……………………………………………………………………….16

Sours: https://utvactionmag.com/yamaha-raptor-700-vs-yfz450-special-editions/

ATV Riders Forum > Sport ATV Model Information > Honda TRX 400EX & 400X ATV Info > For woods trails 400ex or Raptor 700


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View Full Version : For woods trails 400ex or Raptor 700



grump

08-17-2009, 05:23 PM

I didn't get any response on the Raptor Forum, so I'll run this by the 400ex guys.

I'm looking to get a bike in Nov. and I've finally narrowed it down to either a 400ex or a Raptor 700. I can still find a few new '07 400ex's for great deals and I'm sure by Nov the '08's will be just as good of a deal. The Raptor 700 would have to be used and I'd be looking for an '07 or newer and as stock as possible.

My main concern is that I want to be able to ride slow trails with my wife. I know either one can open up and be fun when I ride with my buddy who has a Raptor 660, but my wife likes to take old jeep trails at a snails pace and I'm concerned the Raptor might require too much clutching.

I'm 6'2" 200lbs and have been riding trikes/quads and dirt bikes since '83, so I'm not really worried about handling the bike and I'm not exactly new to this. I'm selling my YZ250 to help pay for the bike as all my buddies that I can ride with are now on quads and they are totally different beasts when it comes to riding.

So what's a better woods/trail quad, the 400ex or the Raptor 700? And of course, why?


honda400ex2003

08-17-2009, 05:42 PM

400 in my opinion it handles better and has a lower center of gravity. it is a great slow riding machine with a ton of low end to get you through any riding day with excitement no matter how slow you go. you can always give it some gas and take off reaching for the sky. lol, you would walk all over a raptor in the woods too when you ride with your buddies. my .02 though, since i have ridden with a couple and have done this myself. steve


Raptors are too top heavy for my liking. It just doesn't feel at home with all the tight turns and such in the trails. My 400 on the other hand feels much more comfortable and stable through the woods at almost any speeds. It has the power when you need it and has a very soft ride too.

The only thing I really like about the Raptor is the amount of torque it has.... but to gain all that extra torque, you will need a ginormous and heavy 700cc engine, heavier duty components, and whatnot. These things are heavy.

Either way you go you will walk all over your buddies 660... But, my vote goes for the 400.


buster024

08-17-2009, 06:30 PM

I have spent time in the saddle on both 400ex's and Raptor 700's, and I'm not a Honda homer. I think Yamaha makes a sweet bike, and in reality would prefer a YFZ to an R, but between the 700 and a 400 for woods and trail riding I dont feel it's even a contest. The Honda is a much better trail, logging road, dirt style bike. If you were a sand-duner, then by all means get the Raptor. The 700 would be the very last bike I would choose for the trails. Way to much torque. I most definitely prefer the low end grunt (the unbeatable 2nd gear) the 400 offers.

.....and I agree with 0101....You'll blow up virtually any Raptor on the trails with a 400, and with all the extra dough you'll save, you can (and should) buy some new suspension.


Ryan'07400ex

08-17-2009, 07:55 PM

You said u were looking for stock but are you keeping it stock is the question. I'd say the 700 has better stock suspension for trails, i've only ridden one a little but my friend seems as capable as us 400's. He has trouble keeping front end down sometimes.

I personally don't like the way you are leaning over the tank so much though and would take a 400ex over it anyday cept maybe a stock to stock 5th gear race.

Just trying to show 2 sides haha


Ba9801

08-17-2009, 08:07 PM

I have ridden many different quads now on tight trails and I still think that I made the best choice with the 400ex. I have tried a 2005 Honda 450R, 2006 Suzuki LT R450 QuadRacer, a couple Yamaha Warrior 350's, Yamaha Raptor 350, Yamaha Blaster, etc.. Unfortunately I have never ridden a Raptor 700. But of all the bikes I have ridden the 400ex has the best overall feel and agility out on the trails. Of coarse if you get in an all out straight away some other bikes will beat you but most of the time you will be leaving them behind on the trails. The 450r's you are on the clutch all the time and the Suzuki is just way to wide for some of the tighter trails. The 400ex has a great balance of width, center of gravity and power. And best of all it has proven Honda powertrain.


tx07400ex

08-17-2009, 09:16 PM

im with these guys one of my friends has a 700 and on trails he cant keep up if we r going slow he gets to hot if we try to speed up he is too worried about rolling. i have flew down trails on my 400 and dropped in a hole with half the bike about a foot and a half doing 55 or 60 and it came out fine on the stock suspension. the 700 is just built too much for racing and not enough for trail riding


Snipe

08-17-2009, 09:24 PM

Also the narrower width of the 400 gives you way much better turning, I can leave my dad behind on his DS650 just cause im so much narrower. 450's have problems in tight places cause of the turning radious is longer. The plus's of the 400 outweigh the raptor in the trails, but its still a good bike none the less.


wrekd

08-17-2009, 11:13 PM

Being 6'2", I would go with the Raptor. Its better suited to bigger riders. Im 6'1" 270 and the 400 feels like a Blaster to me. When I get on my friends Raptor I feel so much better. Not as cramped, and way more low end grunt to haul my fat arse around. To me, it'd be a no brainer, 700 hands down.

I love my 400 but I can't wait to get my Raptor 700. Oh and 1 more thing, the Raptor is liquid cooled. BIG + in my book. The 400 gets wayyyy to hot.


Originally posted by tx07400ex
the 700 is just built too much for drag racing and not enough for trail riding

fixed!


VTredneckgames

08-18-2009, 05:18 AM

Originally posted by wrekd
Being 6'2", I would go with the Raptor. Its better suited to bigger riders. Im 6'1" 270 and the 400 feels like a Blaster to me. When I get on my friends Raptor I feel so much better. Not as cramped, and way more low end grunt to haul my fat arse around. To me, it'd be a no brainer, 700 hands down.

I love my 400 but I can't wait to get my Raptor 700. Oh and 1 more thing, the Raptor is liquid cooled. BIG + in my book. The 400 gets wayyyy to hot.

I respectfully disagree. Im 6'5" 240 and I love my 400. Even my wife and I double 40% of the time on mine. Plenty of room.


08-18-2009, 06:48 AM

Whoever started this thread,
You can't expect to post this question in the 400ex section and have everyone say the Raptor. Post this in the raptor section and it will be just like this thread, only biased towards the raptor.

The Raptor is NOT built for "drag racing":rolleyes: Yamaha built the raptor for one reason.. trails. One of the reason's the old 660's were so tippy, they were 4in's narrower then the 400ex in the front.

The new 700's are nothing like the old 660's. It's a completely different motor, that with an exhaust, filter, and programmer is a complete monster. Depending on what year you get, they come with piggyback fully adjustable shocks. They have the hybrid steel/aluminum frame, and fuel injection.

I find them really comfortable, and they aren't THAT heavy. I guess a couple more pounds then the 400ex makes it super heavy and bad.:ermm:


katch26

08-18-2009, 12:56 PM

the only place the 400 shines over (insert bike here) in the woods is really really tight stuff. The turning radius on the 400 is ridiculous and can literally turn circles around the larger bikes......from my experience


Pipeless416

08-18-2009, 01:28 PM

i wish i had a 700R.. :scary:


bigbad400

08-18-2009, 02:17 PM

pipeless you always say things that i was gonna say. lol.

i too would love the 700 in the woods i ride it wouldnt perform any better than my 400, i also ride with ds650s and they are about the same too. but comming into the straits its nice to have the real launch like a 700 or 650, but why spend money on a big 700 when you could buy a 450 that will smoke both and if you leave it stock then width wont be a problem, my 400 is wider than stock 450 and i go down some tight windy trails. with plus 3's on iv never had to worry about width. all around they say the yfz450 is the best, (not at all a yamaha fan either) for an all around rider.
and the 450 will smoke the raptor 700. but of the 2 choices you gave in the deep deep stuff the 400 will prevail. but honestly id get the raptor, or a 450 of any brand.


grump

08-18-2009, 07:33 PM

Thanks for the replies guys. Actually I originally had post this in the Raptor section, but nobody wanted to comment.

Most of the woods stuff is going to be slow, so even though I like the Raptor I'm just worried it will require a lot of clutch work which would just take the fun out of it. Like I said, to open it up the 700R would be a blast but I know the 400 will move fast enough for the area.

As far as leaving them stock, well with time I'm sure I'd make a few changes. For the Raptor, seriously I'd only consider a tire size change. I think a 23 front and 22 rear would suite the terrain better. For the 400ex, again the tires would eventually change to the 23/22 and both would get sprocket changes to match - with the intent to bring it back to stock performance. I'm sure with the 400 I'd probably add a muffler and beef up the oil cooling system. I'd have to jet it too, regardless, since I'm at 7000' and ride it year round from 20f to 100f weather along with elevation changes from 5000' to 10000'.

I've been leaning toward the 400ex logically, but in a way I'd kind of like to have the 700r. But if 10-20mph on old jeep trails and fire roads peppered with large rocks is going to be a problem then I'd definitely stick to the 400ex. I just can't bring myself to ride a utility all the time, especially since I like to get out with the guys once in a while and open it up too.


Snipe

08-18-2009, 07:43 PM

no the 450's are not bad for tight stuff just the stem dont allow for as tight of turn. my cousin always get stuck on his lol he isnt that great at spinning the tires.

I wouldnt say no to a 700R there heavier yeah but its by 11lbs the raptor 660 or 700 is actually the lightest in the class even against the new honda and older KFX.


Muzzgit

08-19-2009, 12:11 AM

To me the Rappy 700 is too tall and tippy - you sit up on it, not down in it.

The expense of making a 700 less tippy outweighs the expense of making a 400EX perfect ----- 2" wheel spacers on the rear axle, handle bar risers, nurf bars and a good slip-on pipe & air filter.


wrekd

08-19-2009, 12:20 AM

Originally posted by grump

Most of the woods stuff is going to be slow, so even though I like the Raptor I'm just worried it will require a lot of clutch work which would just take the fun out of it.


The Raptor is suited very well for tight trails, reverse, torque out the *****, and if you wanna get up and go, it does that very well too. The 700's 1st gear is actually geared pretty low from the factory. Alot of people say its pretty much useless. My buddy has 1up on the front sprocket with 21" Mudsharks and he could putt around slower then I can on my 400 with stock gearing. Its just a very torquey motor.

Every time I get on my buddy's Raptor I dont even want to get back on my 400. I cant wait to get a Raptor already. The 400's a good quad, but its just outdated.


MtnEX

08-19-2009, 02:46 AM

Originally posted by grump
Thanks for the replies guys. Actually I originally had post this in the Raptor section, but nobody wanted to comment.

Most of the woods stuff is going to be slow, so even though I like the Raptor I'm just worried it will require a lot of clutch work which would just take the fun out of it. Like I said, to open it up the 700R would be a blast but I know the 400 will move fast enough for the area.

As far as leaving them stock, well with time I'm sure I'd make a few changes. For the Raptor, seriously I'd only consider a tire size change. I think a 23 front and 22 rear would suite the terrain better. For the 400ex, again the tires would eventually change to the 23/22 and both would get sprocket changes to match - with the intent to bring it back to stock performance. I'm sure with the 400 I'd probably add a muffler and beef up the oil cooling system. I'd have to jet it too, regardless, since I'm at 7000' and ride it year round from 20f to 100f weather along with elevation changes from 5000' to 10000'.

I've been leaning toward the 400ex logically, but in a way I'd kind of like to have the 700r. But if 10-20mph on old jeep trails and fire roads peppered with large rocks is going to be a problem then I'd definitely stick to the 400ex. I just can't bring myself to ride a utility all the time, especially since I like to get out with the guys once in a while and open it up too.


Well, I wasn't going to click on this thread, but now I am glad I did...

Let me put it to you like this...

I have a Polaris Sport 400 (Scrambler 2x4) which happens to be the only one of mine my wife can ride.

When I bought my 400EX it had 14/38 gearing (down 1 tooth in front) and after riding with her on the auto... and putting the kids around on it, I decided to stay with that gearing. So you know I like the grunt... eases the clutch work... which gets real old to me.

I still have my 400EX... but when I went to trade it, the Raptor 700R was on my list.

I make no bones about it... the newer ones with fully adjustable suspension all the way around.... they are GREAT bikes. I take nothing away from them.

In stock form they are just a little tall is all... and the center of gravity is higher, which there is nothing you can do for...

But bottom line is... this bike has VERY good bottom end. It didn't seem to be a clutch hound at all.

The 450's are the clutch hounds... lots of work to ride slow unless you add a $600 Rekluse clutch kit...


Anyways, between those 2... go with the 700R man... I found a few for $5,000 when I was looking... worth it!!!

Get the 700R and put some good sport tires on it... Maxxis, ITP, GBC, Kenda... and stick to 20" rears... 22's don't handle well and you have to fool around with gearing to get your slow going back...

Anyways, like I say... 700R... 20" sport tires.... then unlock those preload rings on top of the springs and give up as much as you can stand... The object being to get it as low as possible, while still being able to take the rough stuff without beating you to death.

You'll be very happy you did...


Not trying to knock the 400EX for this type of riding at all because this is what it does best... but the 700R is just so much more machine for the money.... Good suspension, good tall tank to knee lock against, liquid cooling, fuel injection so you don't have to fool with re-jetting for the altitude.... and my lord, knocking on near TWICE the displacement!!!!


When I'm riding really slow tight trails on the 450R... in some places I catch myself wishing for the EX... and then I have a slight moment of regret where I wish I had just got the 700R and DUMPED my 400EX period.

If I had the money, I'd swap my 400EX for a 700R tomorrow. Then I would have an unreal trio of quads....


boosted3g

08-19-2009, 05:32 AM

Sounds like you should put the 700xx on your list. I love riding that thing in the woods. You can hit the nastiest or holes and it just glides over it. It does not turn sharp but that irs is worth the trade off. After spending hours on my buddys 700 its my next trail bike. I bought a brand new 400ex in october of 07 and its already gone, it simply needs more power and a watercooled engine.


08-19-2009, 08:32 AM

Originally posted by boosted3g
Sounds like you should put the 700xx on your list. I love riding that thing in the woods. You can hit the nastiest or holes and it just glides over it. It does not turn sharp but that irs is worth the trade off. After spending hours on my buddys 700 its my next trail bike. I bought a brand new 400ex in october of 07 and its already gone, it simply needs more power and a watercooled engine.

Bleh.. for an IRS trail quad don't buy that turd.

No offense to people that own them, but I think they're super sluggish and WAYYYY too heavy.

It never hit me until now, but you should look into the Outlaw grump. The 525 KTM engine is very powerful and has broad torque (and is just as fast as the 700 unless the 700 gets some mods) Not only that, it has IRS with Fox suspension all around, douglas rims, maxxis tires, and in my opinion it's a real nice bike. I feel very comfortable and roomy on it.


Muzzgit

08-19-2009, 08:37 AM

I talk regularly to a quad mechanic who has a customer with the IRS outlaw. It has blown the engine twice since new (he races similar to BAJA) and it chews out the rubber boots on the rear uni joints which is a pain in the butt to repair.


MtnEX

08-22-2009, 01:07 AM

Both of the final dealers I was working with were Kawasaki / Yamaha / Polaris dealers....

And I will tell you... IF I could have left my better judgment in the truck, I would have came home with an Outlaw 525 IRS.

I almost came home long ago with an Outlaw 500 IRS because the value was right... but the dealer messed up the deal.


I think they are very nice bikes, especially for trail riders... like me... riding rough eastern XC woods trails...

I cuss myself for not doing it every time I HIGH-CENTER on the rear skid... and every time I get a hard side-to-side kick from one rear tire hitting something...

And I love my other Polaris too. But I am not a brand loyal guy... and in the end I couldn't bring myself to... because of many things, and one of them was VALUE.

I wanted the combination of the KTM 525 and the IRS... and thought both were OK... and the 08's were great looking to me too...

But it was the rest of it on past what seemed like a good idea. Actually the Polaris part of the bike is what did it for me... Much as I like my other Polaris, I just don't feel like the fit-n-finish is as well executed as it is on the Japanese sport quads.

The final comfort, ergos and confidence was not there. My man-parts did not like the way the front of the seat curled upwards to the tank... The bars and controls were terrible... and the feel of the bike was sort of clunky rather than tight...

Also, I knew if I got it, it would become an immediate money pit... I know I would have laid a wad into suspension, protection and trying to keep up or make the moving parts more reliable.

And when I compared apples to apples on the straight axle versions, there was no way I was going Outlaw over the KFX 450R.


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Fail Crash Yamaha Raptor - ATV quad compilation 2015 #2

THE MIGHTY RAPTOR: BRIEF HISTORY

THE MIGHTY RAPTO: BRIEF HISTORY

The 1990s maintained a stagnant state of limbo for ATV manufacturers of sport quads. Of the potential manufacturers, Yamaha was the strongest player with the famed Banshee 350 and Blaster 200 two-strokes and the Warrior 350 four-stroke. Yamaha had a strong hold on the market, but it also knew that those beloved two-strokes would slowly be forced from the line-up by increasingly strict emissions standards.

The fight to stay ahead of the competition lit a fire beneath the Japanese mega manufacturer’s feet. The legendary two-stroke Yamaha Banshee had to be replaced with new technology—a machine that was more powerful with better handling. The first big-bore sport quad of its kind was born, our beloved torque monster, the 2001 Raptor 660.

Nearing the end of the two-stroke revolution, the age of potent four-stroke powerplants arrived. Soon enough, Kawasaki was hot on Yamaha’s heels with its release of the KFX700 in 2004. Honda took a little longer to breech the 700 class with the 2008 TRX700XX that had rear independent suspension. However, just like the Can-Am DS650 that was released in 2000, none of these machines could match the sales, performance and acceptance of the Raptor.

THE MIGHTY RAPTO: BRIEF HISTORY

A MONSTER WAS BORN

Honda provided the spark that ignited Yamaha’s thirst to build the Raptor—a machine that some called the sport quad king. The 1999 Honda TRX400EX came out 10 years after the TRX250R two-stroke faded out of the market. That machine, derived from the ultra-popular Honda XR400R trail bike, brought new life to the industry with its instant success.

Racers had been building custom sport quads utilizing engines from four-stroke dirt bikes. Here was Honda making a machine that provided the durability and smooth, torquey power of a four-stroke that you could get at a dealer. Yamaha couldn’t let Honda steal the leadership it had held for so long, thus they assembled its best design team to begin creating the Raptor.

First, the team needed an engine. While they had a few to choose from, only one of the engines in other Yamaha ATVs and motorcycles provided the power and technology that the company wanted to implement into what they believed would be a market-changing machine. Yamaha picked a motor from a dual-sport-style motorcycle that most of us have never even heard of, the MZ Baghira. MZ was an East German manufacturer that was instrumental in the early design of two-stroke engines, but once the Soviet Union met its demise, they had to join forces with Yamaha to survive.

The Baghira engine was packed with technology that made it powerful, reliable and easy to work on. The 660cc engine had four valves, a bore and stroke of 100mm x 84mm, was liquid-cooled and had a single-overhead camshaft. A five-speed manual transmission was paired to it, except a reverse gear was added to it, which the Baghira didn’t have.

Dual Mikuni 33mm carburetors were used due to the two intake valves, which allows a better flow of fuel and air than a single large carburetor could provide. The size of the engine made it tricky to design a frame for the Raptor. Yamaha had to rotate the motor forward by redesigning the cases to get it to fit snuggly in the frame. That same lack of space meant that the radiator of the big bore had to be placed higher on the front of the frame right below the handlebars. Finally, Yamaha had to strengthen the clutch so it could handle the extra weight and traction load of the axle and second rear wheel of the Raptor.

The Banshee 350 has been a favorite choice of ATV riders since its inception in the late ’80s, but one thing was always certain about the machine—it never handled well enough for the power of the engine. Turning the Banshee wasn’t the easiest, either. Yamaha took those facts to the drawing board and made sure that the Raptor 660 outmaneuvered the Banshee since the engine was already going to be more powerful.

The front end produced 9.1 inches of wheel travel out of the front dual-A-arm design with 8.7 inches of travel from the rear swingarm. While the suspension numbers were equivalent to the Banshee, the updated frame and suspension geometry of the Raptor helped it turn easier and better than its two-stroke counterpart.

After a few years on the market, the Yamaha Raptor 660 was a hit with consumers, but Kawasaki and Can-Am tried to steal market share. Yamaha began updating the Raptor, and a new model was born.

 

THE MIGHTY RAPTO: BRIEF HISTORY

THE NEXT STEP

The Raptor 700 was the next step in the evolution of the 660, and it was released to an eager public as a 2006 model. The engine was redesigned with a larger-bore aluminum cylinder for 686cc to provide more torque, electronic fuel injection was implemented through a single throttle body and the bodywork was upgraded over the previous sport quad king. Yamaha continued on to make a new frame that had a steel undercarriage with aluminum spars and an aluminum subframe.

The suspension was also updated with better geometry that allowed the machine to gain more shock travel in the rear. Ultimately, that gave the Raptor 700 better handling characteristics, an even more powerful engine and a sleeker look. Multiple models of the 700 were released through the years, including a base-model 700 in 2012 that came with lower-level preload-adjustable shocks. The 700R came with compression- and rebound-adjustable shocks, and Special Edition renditions had limited graphics and plastic colors, as well as GYTR parts.

THE MIGHTY RAPTO: BRIEF HISTORY

Kawasaki’s overly heavy CVT-equipped KFX700 didn’t stand a chance against the Raptor in the end, and the Can-Am DS650 met the same fate. Honda took some time, but eventually released the TRX700XX to compete with the Raptor 700R. Unfortunately, Honda came into the game at the wrong time. In 2008 the economy tanked.

Year after year we saw our beloved racing 450 quads and other sport quads dwindle as their model lineups fell out of the market. The sad truth was that not many could afford buying toys, so new sport quad development faded as well. Sometimes you can catch a Dirt Wheels editor wiping away a tear after recollecting memories of the good old days.

 

THE MIGHTY RAPTO: BRIEF HISTORY

What we didn’t expect was that the infamous Yamaha Raptor 700 would become the best-selling ATV around. It fought through the rise and fall of our economy. The 700 outlived the two-stroke era and battled the sales of race-inspired sport 450 ATVs that boomed since their introduction in 2004. The Raptor 700 offered most of the performance of a 450, but with a reliable, long-lived engine with modest upkeep needs. There is no need to rev the guts out of it, even in the dunes. To this day, we get reader submissions of Raptors that have been upgraded or kept pristine through the years, and plenty of brand-new ones fill the pages in this magazine too. The Yamaha Raptor 700R is a force to be reckoned with!

 

THE MIGHTY RAPTO: BRIEF HISTORY

THE CUSTOM KING

One of the best places to find Raptor masterpieces prowling for weaklings to defeat in straight-line supremacy is at the sand dunes. Stretch it, enhance the handling, beef up the engine and you will fit right into a tribe of fire-breathing warriors. We have covered or built customized Raptors with turbo kits, advanced suspension, big-bore kits and more over the years. The Raptor can be turned into your ultimate trail quad, sand-dune shredder, motocross track master or desert dueler.

The amount of upgrading that can be done to this machine is almost endless, and we have seen our fair share of impressive, gas-guzzling, monster Raptors. If you have an awesome Yamaha Raptor 660 or 700, share it with us by sending photos of it with your full name, city and state, and some info on it to [email protected] Go to www.dirtwheelsmag.com to check out project Raptors, readers’ rides and info on the 2018 Yamaha Raptor 700 lineup as well!

Sours: https://dirtwheelsmag.com/history-of-the-raptor-660700-a-sport-quad-still-alive/

400 quad raptor

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