J vs k color diamond

J vs k color diamond DEFAULT

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People are often dismissive of K color diamonds and the rest of the color grades below them. These stones do have a great deal of value and benefits, however, and can make for some gorgeous engagement rings.

The color in K color diamonds call for some planning with the ring design but the end result can be pleasant on the eye and light on the budget.

Contents

The Color Grading System

Diamond color grading chart

Diamond color is graded on an alphabetical scale that goes from D to Z. It’s established by the G.I.A. (Gemological Institute of America) and it’s used worldwide. It has 23 different color grades with the first few being completely colorless and subsequent grades becoming increasingly tinted.

Here are the basic color grades for colorless diamonds:

  • D, E and F – These diamonds are colorless and show no tints. These are also among the most expensive diamonds, all else being equal.
  • G, H, I  and J – These grades are known as near colorless diamonds. Of these, G is noticeably less yellow than a J.
  • K to Z–  These grades are faint yellow diamonds, increasing in intensity with each subsequent grade. Most retailers don’t sell diamonds below the M grade.

K color diamonds fall near the middle of this scale and they do have faint yellow or brownish color hues that can be seen by the naked eye.  

What Does A K Color Diamond Look Like?

  • k color diamond front view
  • Side view k color diamond

See this diamond in 360 degrees here and notice how the color changes depending on the angle the diamond is viewed at.

If you want a completely colorless diamond, the K color grade isn’t for you. Diamonds from this grade are noticeably warmer, especially when viewed from the side. However, with the right metal color and ring setting their color can be used to their advantage.

K Color Diamonds Have Undertones

As you go down the diamond color grading scale and reach the warm diamond categories, you’ll notice something new in the GIA grading report – undertones. This applies to K color diamonds and to all other diamond color grades that follow.

The undertones specification in the report refers to what color the “faint colors” are. With K color diamonds the most common undertones are yellow or brown but if you go into the Very light color and Light color grades you can see other undertones as well.

Choosing between yellow and brown undertones can seem like a trivial choice at first but it actually matters for several different reasons:

  1. The difference is noticeable. Because K color diamonds are sufficiently low on the color grading scale and their color hues are noticeable to the naked eye,  brown toned diamonds like this one and diamonds with yellow undertones, like this, look distinctively different.
  2. The undertones of your faintly colored diamond can guide the type of metal you should choose for your ring or the other way around. K color stones with brown undertones look better with rose gold rings while ones with yellow undertones work best with yellow gold.
  3. Brown undertones in faintly colored diamonds are actually less expansive than yellow ones because the industry has deemed them to be less valuable. This is mostly because they don’t work as well with yellow and white metals, however, if you were going for a rose gold ring anyway, you can lighten your budget a bit by choosing a K color diamond with brown undertones.

G Color Grade vs. Other Color Grades

K color diamonds sit at the top of the third color grade group so they are pretty close to J color diamonds which are considered Near Colorless. This means that while an expert should still be able to tell the difference between a K color diamond and a G color diamond (in addition to the $1,000-$2,000 price difference), it’s much harder to differentiate said K color diamond from a similar J color stone.

Similarly, there are certain slight differences between the K color category and L or M color diamonds – L and M diamonds have a stronger color and usually a 3-digit difference in the price tag.

Best Ring Settings for K Color Diamonds

Faintly colored diamonds such as K color ones are usually paired with non-white metals such as yellow or rose gold. That’s because white gold or other white metals can make the slight color of K diamonds appear more prominent.

Notice the K diamonds in the two rings below. The diamond in the white setting appears warmer, with its hues more visible.

k color diamond engagement ring with yellow gold

K Diamond in Rose Gold Setting. Check Price here.

k color diamond ring with white gold

K Diamond in White Gold Setting. Check Price Here.

As for settings, the common practice is to pick settings that cover the sides of the stone such as halo or bezel settings. This is because the color of diamonds are most easily noticeable when you look at the stone from the side. The drawback here is that covering more of the diamond’s surface reduces its exposure to light and thus lowers its brilliance.

If you want to use a halo setting or other side stone, pave, or channel settings, keep in mind that the white melee or smaller diamonds used in such settings can also cause an unfortunate contrast with the center diamond’s color. The halo of the ring should be set with diamonds of the same color as the center stone, as this blends in with the warm tints of the K diamond.

k color diamond ring halo setting

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When carefully and expertly set, a K diamond will look as good as any other diamond. To reiterate, it’s best to opt for warm toned metals that bring out the sparkle of the diamodn while minimizing its hues.

What are the Pros and Cons of K color diamonds?

These are most of the major things you’ll need to know about K color diamonds. To help you decide whether you should buy a K diamond, here’s a quick rundown of K color diamonds’ Pros and Cons:

Pros:

  • K color diamonds are much more affordable than Colorless and Near Colorless diamonds. This makes them a great way to save some money from the diamond’s total price which you could then use on higher carat size, a better cut or cleaner clarity.
  • While they do have distinct color, K color diamonds are still not too “colorful” and their color tinges can be easily masked or hidden with the right metal color and/or setting.
  • K color doesn’t affect the brilliance of the diamond nearly as much as some would lead you to believe – a K color diamond will still offer a great deal of brilliance and sparkle depending on the quality of the cut.  

Cons:

  • The main con of K color diamonds is self-explanatory – they have visible color hues. If that’s not a big problem for you – great! If it is – your wallet will be grateful.

Should you get a K color diamond for your engagement ring?

The quick answer here is that if you have a limited budget, K color diamonds are one of the best ways to save money on your ring’s stone without compromising with its beauty. K color diamonds can offer excellent brilliance and can look great on the right ring, and they are definitely not anything to feel bad about – don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

On the other hand, if you do want a crystal clear diamond for your engagement ring that’s not only perfectly cut and devoid of any inclusions, but also has no color whatsoever – the K color range is not for you. Any of the Colorless or Near Colorless grades will offer a noticeable difference In color at a price difference of about 4 digits or more.

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J Color Diamonds | Are They Good Or Bad?

Are J color diamonds good or bad?

Finding the right diamond color that balances price with aesthetics is one of the most important aspects of your diamond purchase. Before I dive into the most commonly asked questions, it’s important to say that color is a matter of preference - some people are hypersensitive to it and others are not. I’m going to write this from the standpoint of an average person, someone who doesn’t work with diamonds on a daily basis, and give you the general rules of thumb based on my real experience and the general consensus.

If you’re considering buying your diamond online, make sure you spend some time at a local jeweler looking at different diamond color grades of GIA or AGS certified diamonds to determine what color grades you’re comfortable buying. You should also make sure to see the diamonds in natural light to get comfortable with fluorescence in diamonds such as this 1 carat J VS2 with medium fluorescence from Blue Nile.

J color diamonds are a good choice for diamond buyers looking to get a larger carat size while staying in the near colorless range. The presence of color in a diamond is made more apparent by a number of factors that are important to consider up front. The shape of the diamond, presence of fluorescence, cut quality, and the setting color (white or yellow gold for example) will all affect the appearance of color in your diamond, sometimes in the opposite way you’d naturally expect. We’ll break down the main considerations below, but first let’s talk about what it means to be a J color diamond.

What is a J color diamond?

J color diamonds are part of the near colorless class of diamonds which includes grades G through J on the GIA grading scale. These diamonds can exhibit some color (typically yellow), but this color saturation is most visible when the diamond is viewed from the side. Luckily, diamonds are viewed from above when placed in an engagement ring or other jewelry setting which can help to hide some of the color. The point at which people begin to notice color is generally in the J to K range, which is why K color diamonds are part of the faint color group that includes L and M color as well.

Near Colorless Diamonds

It’s also why J color diamonds are such a steal relative to other diamond colors - people who are fine with going for a larger carat size and more saturation tend to go down to K color (since it is considered “faint colored' they perceive it as a better value play) and people are who are concerned about color tend to steer toward the higher end of the near colorless spectrum. It’s important to mention that J color is itself a range, with the “whitest' J color diamonds looking more similar to I color and the worst looking more similar to K color. We’ll also take this moment to note that some diamonds have a brown hue rather than a yellow color, and these diamonds are less desirable and tend to price lower. We’ll discuss this further momentarily.

What shapes are best for J color diamonds?

The best shape to buy for a J color diamond is round brilliant cut (also known as round cut) because round diamonds typically offer superior light performance and this sparkle can help to hide the appearance of color when the diamond is viewed from above. Since diamonds are typically viewed from above when set in an engagement ring or jewelry, jewelers refer to a diamond that looks white from the top as facing up white. This term is typically used when describing J or K color diamonds that look colorless from above but show their color from the side. The remainder of this post will generally focus on round cut diamonds.

Let's see just how noticeable color in a diamond when viewed from above. Both of the excellent cut, 2 carat, VS1 clarity diamonds below face up white, but one of them is a D color and the other is a J color. One of the below is priced for approximately $50,000 and the other is less than $15,000. Keep reading down the page or click on the images to see the diamonds at Blue Nile and reveal their true color grades, but the point is - if you have to check, does color matter to you as much as you think it does?

2 Carat J Color Facing Up White
2 Carat D Color Diamond Facing Up White

What carat size is best for a J color diamond?

The larger the diamond, the more apparent its color will be to the untrained eye. If you are choosing a larger round cut diamond (say 1.5 carats and up), it may be better to stick to I color or better as color tends to become more visible as the carat weight increases. That said, I’ve seen plenty of great J color diamonds that face up white in diamonds larger than 2.5 carats. In my personal opinion, people get too hung up on color and end up overspending here. Maybe that’s why stepping up a color grade is more expensive than stepping up a clarity grade. Since it’s easier to see color from the side check out the below 1 carat and 5.55 carat J VS1 diamonds. The larger 5.55 carat has a more noticeable yellow hue to it from the side. However, this diamond looks much whiter from above.

What color setting is best for a J color diamond?

Every diamond picks up color from its surroundings, but this is actually a point in favor of J color diamonds relative to colorless diamonds. The difference between colorless and near colorless diamonds becomes less significant once they are viewed in a setting since both pick up some elements of color from the setting and reflect his out the top the stone. White gold and platinum settings do not hide color to the same degree that yellow and rose gold do, but they will still help disguise the diamond's natural coloration to a degree. So, the best setting color for a J color diamond is yellow gold or rose gold, but a platinum or white gold setting will still help to hide some of the natural color in the stone.

Do J color diamonds look yellow?

So, we’ve told you that the larger the diamond the more color will tend to show up to the casual observer, and that’s true. But this is all relative, and J color diamonds don’t look like you just stuck a lemon on someone’s finger. J color diamonds will almost certainly display some yellow (or brown) color when viewed from the side or facedown, however they typically do not show much or any color when viewed from above in an engagement ring setting. To prove the point I picked out a few 2 carat diamonds from Blue Nile’s recently purchased engagement rings page. In my opinion all of these 2 carat diamonds look nice and white in their various color settings.

This J color diamond in a white gold setting is a great example of how white a J color diamond looks even when placed in a simple solitaire setting. Even though the white setting does not help to make the diamond look as white as a gold or rose gold setting would, it looks like it could easily pass for a higher color grade.

2 carat j color diamond in solitaire platinum or white gold setting

This J color diamond in a platinum halo setting shows how side stones can help to disguise the color of the center stone. If you want to make your J color diamond pop you could choose side stones that are K color since the eye picks up on the differences in color and this will emphasize the whiter center diamond. J color side stones will also look nice and consistent.

2 carat j color diamond in solitaire platinum or white gold setting

J color diamonds in gold or rose gold settings often look much whiter than they would as a loose diamond, as you can see in the picture below. A higher color grade of diamond would be wasted on a gold or rose gold setting because the human eye picks up the relative difference in color and this stark contrast makes the center stone really pop, even in a K color.

2 carat j color diamond in solitaire yellow gold setting

Which fluorescence grade is best for a J color diamond?

The intensity of fluorescence within a diamond can directly impact the way that diamond interacts with UV light and thus affects the way our eyes perceive color. When the natural yellow color within a diamond meets the blue hue of a fluorescence revealed by UV light (including sunlight), the colors cancel each other out to a degree. For this reason, it is often a good thing to find faint, medium, or even strong fluorescence in a J color diamond and these diamonds don’t sell for much of a discount to those without fluorescence. In fact, sometimes they cost more. To understand the impact fluorescence has on pricing for J color diamonds check out this chart from our diamond fluorescence blog post.

diamond fluorescence price changes chart

The Final Verdict

Diamonds are a big investment, and one of the worst mistakes you can make from a financial perspective is overspending on color. The price increase from a 2 carat J VS2 to a 2 carat I VS2 is nearly 28% according to our diamond price calculator, a difference of $3,700. That’s a massive increase for a single color grade. For perspective, the same diamond would only cost 12% more to step up from I to H color, and the price increase from K to J color is just 14%. This means there is a huge price gap at this point of the market, indicating that this is where people feel the most sensitive to a change in color grade. If you’re willing to take the leap to purchase a J color over an I color, that single color grade could save you more money than any other decision you make this year.

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Complete Guide to Buying a K Color Diamond October 11, 2021 – Posted in: Jewelry Blog

One of the most spoken about of the 4Cs of diamond appraising is the color. In this article, we will discuss one of the most misunderstood colors; the K color diamond.

The color scale against which all diamonds are graded actually runs from D to Z. The reason there are no A-C grades is historical and pre-dates the official GIA scale used today.

What is a K Colored Diamond?

11930 Diamond Engagement Ring

A K-colored diamond is a natural diamond with a yellowish tint that falls between J and L on the diamond color scale. A K color diamond will typically show a yellowish hue that will be easy to spot as you bring the diamond close to your eye.

How Does Diamond Color Scale Work?

Diamond Color Range

Prior to the 1940s, several scales were in use to grade diamonds on their color. There were scales that used Roman numerals, words like “water” and “river”, and one which used A, B, and C. This made things very confusing as dealers had to know how each scale worked based on where in the world they were. Even more confusing was the way the alphabetical scale used A, AA, AAA etc for increasing quality.

To cut ties with the old ways completely, GIA started the scale we know today at D. Now, this is the de-facto scale used around the world by all diamond dealers and jewelers. Click here to learn how to read a GIA certificate.

To most of us, a D color diamond is just about impossible to differentiate from a J color diamond. This is a key reason why an appraisal certificate from a recognized body is essential when buying a diamond. Without it, you’d have no reliable way of knowing what the color actually was.

Shop K Color Diamonds

Feel free to browse our collection of K color diamond rings. If you want to see our full collection, contact us using the form below.

  • Georgian Yellow Gold and Silver Earrings - Hazelwood Earrings
    Hazelwood Earrings. Circa 1830.
  • Antique Art Deco Platinum Ring Circa 1920 - Bellefontaine Ring
    Normandy Ring. Circa 1920
  • 1.11ct Diamond and Sapphire Platinum Engagement Ring 13281 TV
  • Diamond Victorian Style Cluster Gold and Silver Ring 13278
  • 1.25ct Diamond and Sapphire Double Halo Platinum Engagement Ring 13128
  • 1.09ct Three Stone Old European Cut Diamond Engagement Ring 12965
  • Genesee SB9808 Asscher Cut Diamond Engagement Ring
  • Lawrence 5 Carat Old European Cut Diamond Ring TV 12964
  • Dutchess 5.01ct Cushion Cut Diamond Ring
  • 1-ct Vintage Style Solitaire Ring with Old European Cut Diamond 12702 TV
  • Warwick Ring Top View
  • McKinney Ring Top View

What Makes A Diamond White?

Examining an engagement ring with a loupe

Actually, it’s what doesn’t make a diamond white.

Traces of other elements are what cause otherwise white diamonds to be yellow, brown, and even red or blue.

In the most common non-white color of yellow, it is nitrogen that is responsible for the color being present. Nitrogen, whilst being the most abundant element in the atmosphere, isn’t particularly common in the earth’s crust. This makes it a little surprising that Nitrogen is the element most commonly found in diamonds, after carbon.

By the time we get to K on the color scale, the yellow tint is starting to become more pronounced. Based on this, you’d be forgiven for thinking that anything below J would be discarded and considered unsuitable for fine jewelry. But you’d be wrong to write off K color stones quite so easily.

How Yellow is a K Color Diamond?

K Color Asscher Cut Diamond

As we’ve mentioned above, it’s unlikely that you or I would be able to see much yellow color in a K color diamond unless, perhaps, we had a colorless diamond sat beside it for comparison.  On the old color scales, K was the equivalent of what was called “Tinted White”, as opposed the next grade of “Tinted Color”. This is a good indication that K belongs more to the top end of the scale than the bottom.

When set with platinum or white gold, the yellow tint in a K color diamond may start to become noticeable. However, this would still require close examination. With the usual viewing distance that you’d expect for an engagement ring (about 15-inches or so), any observer would be hard pushed to see anything but a colorless diamond.

Conversely, in a yellow gold setting, the slight warmth of the K color would be exaggerated. This versatility makes a K color diamond one of the most versatile there is.

J Color vs K Color?

Diamond color group scale

Deciding between getting a J color or K color is a much more common question that you would believe. And it’s also a very hard question to answer objectively.

Here is a list of things to consider so that you can answer the question by yourself:

  • The difference in yellow-ish color is not so noticable (especially if the K color is an antique diamond)
  • The price difference is quite noticable especially in diamonds larger than 2 carats.
  • J Color diamonds are a little easier to sell and are more desirable (and rarer)
  • Many feel that once a diamond already has a little bit of color (j color), it doesn’t really matter to have a little more in K color.
  • J and K are in two different color brackets on the color-scale chart.

Undersanding Antique K Color Diamonds

Antique Cushion Cut K Color Diamond

Antique diamonds are becoming harder to find, but those that do survive, though, have a couple of distinct advantages over a modern cut diamond. This is especially true of those “officially classed as K color”.

Antique diamonds have something that modern stones will never have, a big advantage in the color.

Diamond grading is always done at 10x magnification, which makes seeing inclusions, flaws, and color tints much easier. With antique cuts like old mine and old European, the cut itself is a huge help to the apparent color.

Although classed as K color, most antique diamonds will actually present themselves quite differently from a top view angle. Many K color antique diamonds compare favorably to a modern J or even I color stone.

The old cuts somehow mask any tint at this level, making them appear much whiter than a 10x loupe examination would establish.

K Color Diamond Value

K Color Diamond Prices

So, if a K color antique diamond looks like a J color, for example, is it such a big deal? Well, we’ve already said that the difference between J and K colors is very difficult for the naked eye to see, but it is still important.

The reason it is important is very simple. Cost.

Whereas a J color diamond will be around half the price of a D color with all other things being equal, so a K diamond may be as much as 20-30% lower in price than a J color. Most jewelers will consider K color to be the start of the tinted diamonds when really it should be the end of the colorless. When we consider the added benefits of the antique cuts in hiding color, the financial advantage becomes even more pronounced.

Final Thoughts

77501 engagement rings for $80000

If you remember the information above next time you’re shopping for a diamond or a finished ring, you can grab yourself a real bargain by refusing to be seduced by letters. Think “antique” and think “K”, when shopping, and you’ll have more of your money in your pocket when you leave than you might have expected.

If you have doubts, ask to see both J and K colors side by side. We doubt you’ll be able to tell the difference, especially if the K is an old mine or old European cut.

D color diamonds are truly beautiful things, but there’s a reason why they are out of reach for many of us. Being a bit savvier about what colors down the scale really mean will make a difference.

Click here to browse our collection of K-color diamond rings and jewelry.

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Diamond Color Buying Guide: Comparing color \u0026 3 tips to save you money on your engagement ring

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Deal Alert! 25% off James Allen settings and 15% off Blue Nile settings!

Considering a J color diamond? J color diamonds can be a great choice in certain situations For example a diamond like this one from James Allen is stunning and will look perfect in certain engagement rings. Many people may gravitate towards a diamond like this from James Allen, and in certain setting types, you may have to. But if they are in cetain settings, you would not be able to tell the difference and you will save $1,560 (a savings of more than 25%).

There are several things you’ll want to be aware of before you buy a diamond in this color grade. These include the diamond shape, the cut quality, and even the type of setting you choose for the diamond. 

Below, we’ve explained everything you need to know about J color diamonds, from their color and general appearance to how they stack up next to better color grades, both in looks and in terms of value for money. 

What Are J Color Diamonds? 

As we’ve explained in our guide to diamond color, all diamonds receive a color grade ranging from D (nearly colorless) to Z (visibly yellow) from the GIA. 

J color diamonds fit into the “Near Colorless” range of the scale, meaning that while they may display some hints of color, they still appear primarily colorless when they’re looked at with the naked eye. 

The J color grade is actually the lowest color grade that’s considered near colorless using the GIA’s color scale. 

To a certain extent, this has created a false perception that J color diamonds have an obvious, visible color that makes them less beautiful than diamonds in better color grades. 

Because of this, a lot of consumers — often aided by jewelers wanting to sell more expensive diamonds — ignore J color diamonds in favor of G, H and I diamonds. 

The reality is that a high quality, beautifully cut J color diamond can look absolutely stunning in an engagement ring or other jewelry, all while costing significantly less than an almost identical diamond with a better color grade.

With this said, there are a few downsides to J color diamonds that you’ll need to be aware of if you’re considering a diamond with this color grade. We’ve covered these further down the page, along with more information on the best ways to buy J color diamonds. 

How J Color Diamonds Compare to Other Color Grades

As we explained above, J color diamonds are the lowest color grade that’s still considered near colorless by the GIA. 

By far the most common concern people have about J color diamonds is whether or not they’ll look colorless once they’re set in an engagement ring. Below, we’ve compared the color of a J color diamond (left) to a D color diamond (right, the highest color grade):

D-J round diamond front comparison

Both of these diamonds are from James Allen. Aside from their color, they’re identical in terms of quality — 1.00 carat, VS2, excellent cut round brilliant cut diamonds. 

As you can see, the J color diamond looks slightly more yellow than the D color diamond — a difference that’s quite subtle but easy to notice when the diamonds are compared side by side under bright light and with magnification. 

However, viewed with the naked eye away from bright lighting, it’s much harder to see the color difference between these two diamonds.

Despite this subtle difference, there’s a significant difference in price between the D color and J color diamonds. The D color diamond costs $6,000 on James Allen without a setting, while the J color diamond from James Allen is available for $3,920 — almost $2,080 less. 

Part of the reason the color difference between these diamonds is quite subtle is the cut. Round brilliant diamonds have a cut that’s designed for optimal brilliance. Because they reflect so much light, they’re very good at concealing differences in color when viewed from above. 

For example, take a look at the same two diamonds, this time viewed from the side rather than from above:

D-J round diamond side comparison

From this angle, the difference in color between the two diamonds is much more obvious and visible.

The difference in appearance between the J color grade and better color grade is also much more obvious with other diamond shapes, especially those that have a different facet pattern from the round brilliant cut. 

For example, compare this 1.01 carat J color emerald diamond from James Allen (left) to this D color emerald diamond also from James Allen (right) of similar cut, clarity and carat weight:

As you can see, the difference in color is a bit more obvious with this cut. Other shapes with a similar facet pattern to the emerald cut, such as the Asscher, cushion, radiant and princess cuts, may also display the slight yellow color of a J color diamond more than the round brilliant cut.

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J Color Diamond Pricing

The color of a diamond has a huge impact on its price, with diamonds in the colorless range (D, E and F grades) significantly more expensive than diamonds in the near-colorless range.

The price difference between a D color diamond and a diamond of the same cut quality, clarity and carat weight with a J color grade is significant. For example, the D and J round brilliant cut diamonds we compared above had a price difference of $1,940.

As well as being significantly cheaper than colorless diamonds, J color diamonds can also be more affordable than other diamonds in the near-colorless range.

For example, this 1.00 carat, VS1 clarity, excellent cut, J color round brilliant cut diamond sells for $4,300 from James Allen. This G color diamond, also from James Allen, with identical cut quality, carat weight and color is priced at $6,000. That’s a $1,700 difference in price. 

There’s also a reasonably significant difference in price between the J and I color grades, even though they’re only one grade apart. For example, this 0.8 carat I color princess cut diamond from Blue Nile is $3,216, while this J color diamond also from Blue Nile is more than 20% cheaper at $2,523. 

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When is a J Color Diamond a Good Choice?

As we mentioned above, the visible difference between the J grade and better color grades is more obvious in certain cuts than others. 

It’s also more visible in certain settings and metals than others. For example, metals like rose and yellow gold will both pass some of their color into a diamond, making it look slightly more yellow than it really is, even if it has a flawless color grade. 

Because of the effect, these metals have on a diamond, picking a J color diamond for a yellow or rose gold setting is a smart buy. The difference in color is almost impossible to notice due to the strong hue of the metal, giving you more money to spend on cut quality or larger carat weight. Sometimes it’s even possible to go lower than J, to K color diamonds.

On the other hand, white-colored metals like platinum and white gold can make the slight yellow tint of a J color diamond more visible if you choose a diamond shape that emphasizes color. 

This usually isn’t an issue with round brilliant cut diamonds (we actually recommend the J color grade for any solitaire settings), but it can be an issue with diamonds in other shapes, as we’ve explained below. 

For Round Diamonds

For round brilliant cut diamonds, we think the J color grade can be an excellent choice. While J color diamonds do have a very slight color, the round brilliant cut’s facet pattern and its ability to reflect light means you won’t notice this color once it’s set in a solitaire ring.

J color round brilliant cut diamonds can look great in all metals, including white metals like white gold and platinum. As we covered in our guide to the round cut, you can actually drop down to a K or L color grade for yellow gold solitaire rings, all without the color looking too obvious. 

By choosing a J color diamond instead of a diamond with a better color grade, you’ll be able to set aside more of your budget for cut quality and carat weight — two factors that have a bigger impact on the diamond’s appearance.

For Other Diamond Shapes

While the J color grade can be a great value choice for round diamonds, it isn’t always a good choice for other diamond shapes.

Not all diamond shapes reflect light as well as the round brilliant cut, meaning they tend to show their color more obviously. This is particularly true for diamond shapes like the Asscher, emerald and princess cuts, all of which have a large table that makes their color quite visible. 

For more of these shapes, you’ll generally want to stick with a color grade of I or better to avoid the stone looking too yellow (for some cuts, such as the marquise cut, a grade of H or better is recommended). 

If you do choose a J color diamond in any of these cuts, we recommend avoiding white gold or platinum settings, both of which will make the slight yellow tint of the diamond more visible. 

If you’re considering a diamond in any shape other than a round brilliant cut, check our diamond shape guide for specific recommendations. Each shape-specific guide lists our recommendation for diamond color grades that look the best, all while offering the best value. 

Not sure which color and shape combination is best? Feel free to contact us to get personalized help from our diamond experts. 

J Color Diamonds and Halo/Pavé Settings

Beyond your choice of metal, the design of the setting you choose can also have an impact on how good a J color diamond looks. This isn’t an issue with a solitaire setting, although it can be something worth considering for settings that feature separate diamonds. 

If you’re considering a halo, pavé or side stone setting for your J color diamond, it’s important to check that the diamonds used in the engagement ring setting are similar in color to your chosen center stone. 

With three-stone and side stone settings, and particularly those with reasonably large side stone diamonds (that are certified), we recommend that side diamonds always either match the color of the center stone or are slightly darker. 

This can often be difficult to do with a J color diamond, meaning you may want to choose a G, H or similar near colorless diamond if you like this type of setting.

Conclusion

J color diamonds can look absolutely stunning, provided they’re the right shape. If you’re looking for a round brilliant cut diamond for your solitaire setting, picking one with the J color grade allows you to save anywhere from hundreds to thousands of dollars, depending on the cut quality, clarity and carat weight.

This lets you allocate more of your budget towards a larger diamond or a diamond with a better quality cut — two factors that will affect its appearance more than its color. 

If you need help buying a J color diamond or aren’t sure which color grade is best for you, contact us. Our experts can help you find the highest quality diamond for your tastes and budget.

About the author

Michael Fried

Michael Fried

Mike learned the diamond business from the ground-up at Leo Schachter Diamonds - one of the world's top diamond manufacturers. He has been recognized as a diamond industry expert by Time, People, Money, The Daily Mirror, NerdWallet, The Times Herald, Yahoo Finance Australia, The Art of Charm, The Washington Diplomat, The Next Web, and more.

James Allen James AllenJames Allen is the leader in online diamond sales. Their imaging technology is the same as inspecting a diamond with a jeweler's loupe. They have the largest exclusive loose diamond inventory online and fantastic prices. They also have the nicest collection of lab created diamonds online. Save 10% off select Lab Grown Diamonds and 25% on setttings!

Click to Visit

What we love about them:

  • No questions asked returns within 30 days of shipment. James Allen will send you a paid shipping label to return the ring.
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • Free International Shipping
  • Free prong tightening, repolishing, rhodium plating and cleaning every 6 months
  • Provide insurance appraisals
  • One free resizing within 60 days of purchase
  • Free ring inscriptions
  • Best-in-class high quality imagery of all diamonds in stock
  • 24/7 Customer Service
  • Best-in-class packaging
Arrow down
Arrow up

Blue Nile Blue NileBlue Nile is the largest and most well known internet jewelry seller. They have a very large exclusive online inventory. Their high quality images are catching up to James Allens' and their prices are amazing. Blue Nile have generously offered our readers an exclusive one-time use coupon. (Click Here to save $100 off engagement ring settings)

Click to Visit

What we love about them:

  • No questions asked returns within 30 days of shipment. Blue Nile will send you a paid shipping label to return the ring.
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • Free Shipping
  • Free prong tightening, repolishing, rhodium plating and cleaning every 6 months
  • Provide insurance appraisal
  • One free resizing within the first year of purchase
  • High quality images of about half of their diamonds
  • 24/7 Customer Service
  • 100% credit towards future upgrades (must be at least double in value)
  • Best in class fulfillment
Arrow down
Arrow up

Still afraid of getting ripped off?

Before you buy a diamond, get personal buying advice from industry veterans. We'll help you get the best diamond for the money.

Ask your diamond purchase question here

DISCLAIMER: We don't use your email for marketing. Period.

Sours: https://www.diamonds.pro/education/j-color-diamonds/

Diamond k color j vs

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Deal Alert! 25% off James Allen settings and 15% off Blue Nile settings!

A K color diamond is not always a bad choice. It can make a beautiful choice with the right shape, cut quality and setting style. For example, this 1.05 carat K color diamond from Blue Nile would look stunning in a yellow gold or rose gold setting like this solitaire engagement ring. While K color diamonds do have a slight tint to them, in certain settings and shapes, the color is so slight it’s not noticeable to the naked eye. 

K color diamonds can also save you significant cost when compared with other diamond color grades. For instance, this 1 carat K color diamond from James Allen with VS2 clarity and excellent cut costs $2,000, while this 1 carat D color diamond also from James Allen with the same clarity and cut quality costs $4,800. The K color diamond provides a savings of $2,800 — almost 60%. 

But before buying a K color diamond, there are a few things to keep in mind. Below we’ll explain the best diamond shapes, cut quality and settings for K color diamonds. We’ll also explain when it’s best to choose a higher color grade, such as a J or I color diamond. 

Overall, the goal is to find a beautiful diamond that fits your style without paying more than you need to. K color diamonds, when done right, can be a great way to get a gorgeous diamond at a fantastic price point.

What are K color diamonds?

K Colored Diamonds

K color diamonds are categorized as a “faint tint” on the GIA diamond color scale, meaning that they have a hint of color, usually yellow, that’s noticeable to the naked eye. The tinting isn’t too dark, though, as there are several color grades that are lower than K. 

All diamonds certified by the GIA receive a color grade that ranges from D (nearly colorless) to Z (visible tint). On the scale, the K color grade is right next to the nearly colorless range of H to J. 

The tint of a K color diamond is ever so slight. When in certain shapes and paired with the right setting color, these diamonds can look just as colorless as a higher graded diamond. A lot of consumers ignore K color diamonds because they feel the tint will be too strong, but that isn’t always the case. You can find beautiful K color diamonds if you know what to look for and what type of engagement ring to put them in. 

Choosing a K color diamond can save you considerable money, and still give you a beautiful diamond. 

That said, there are a few downsides to K color diamonds that you should be aware of when considering this color grade. These considerations are covered below on our page along with information on when it’s best to buy K color diamonds.

K color diamonds vs. other color grades

As explained above, K color diamonds are adjacent to the nearly colorless range by the GIA and are considered as having a faint tint. 

The most common concern about K color diamonds is whether they’ll look colorless in an engagement ring. Below, we’ve compared the color of a K color diamond from James Allen (left) to a D color diamond from James Allen (right, the highest color grade):

Both diamonds are from James Allen. Besides their color grades, they’re identical in terms of quality — 1 carat, VS1 clarity, excellent round brilliant cut diamonds. 

As the image shows, the K color diamond appears slightly more yellow than the D color diamond. The difference is subtle, but still noticeable when placed side by side under a bright light and magnification.  

While the difference in appearance is subtle, the difference in price is significant between K color and D color diamonds. The D color diamond costs $8,190 while an otherwise identical K color diamond costs $3,540 — saving you $4,650, or 57%. 

The color difference between these diamonds is subtle, partly due to the cut. Round brilliant diamonds are cut for maximum brilliance. They reflect so much light that they are great at concealing differences in color when viewed from the top. 

As an example, look at the same two diamonds, but this time viewed from the side instead of from above:

At this angle, the color difference is more noticeable. The diamond on the left has a distinct yellow hue to it. 

The difference between a K color diamond and a better color grade is also more obvious with other diamond shapes. For instance, those with a different facet pattern than the round brilliant show color more easily.  

As an example, compare this K color Asscher diamond from James Allen (left) to this D color Asscher diamond from James Allen (right) with a similar cut quality, clarity grade and carat weight:

With this comparison of Asscher cut diamonds, the color difference is a little more obvious. Shapes such as asscher, cushion, radiant or emerald cut diamonds, show the tinting of the K color grade more readily than a round brilliant diamond.

TheDiamondPro

Think You’re A Diamond Pro?

These diamonds look identical in a ring.
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The J color at $4082
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K color diamond prices

A diamond’s color grade plays a large role in how it’s priced. Diamonds in the colorless range (D, E and F grades) are considerably more expensive than diamonds in the nearly colorless range (G, H, I, and J grades). 

The price difference between a K color diamond and a D color diamond of the same carat weight, cut quality and clarity is sizable. For instance, the round K and D color diamonds in our comparison above carry a price tag difference of $4,650. 

K color diamonds are also significantly less expensive than diamonds in the colorless range and those in the nearly colorless range. 

For instance, this 1 carat K diamond from James Allen is priced at $3,540. This 1 carat H color diamond also from James Allen with identical cut quality and clarity is $6,130. The price difference is $2,590 — a massive 42% less.  

Even though they’re only one grade apart, there’s even a big difference in price between K and J color diamonds. As an example, this 1.57 carat K color diamond from Blue Nile with VS2 clarity and an excellent cut is $6,817, while this 1 carat J color diamond from Blue Nile with the same clarity and cut grades is $7,304. That’s a savings of $487 or almost 7%.

    Ringo™ Approved Eye Clean Diamonds

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Are K Diamonds too Yellow for an Engagement Ring?

As mentioned above and shown in the examples, the visible difference between K color diamonds and better color grades is more noticeable in certain shapes than others. 

The color difference is also more distinct with certain settings and metals. For instance, rose gold and yellow gold pass some of their tone onto the diamond, making the diamond appear slightly more yellow than it is, even if it’s a D or E color diamond. 

Because of the impact these slightly darker metals have on a diamond, choosing a K color diamond for a rose or yellow gold engagement ring like this one from Blue Nile can be a savvy buy. The difference in diamond color is almost impossible to notice due to the strong hue of the metal, giving you more money to spend on carat weight or cut quality (the most important aspect of a diamond’s beauty). 

Remember, though, that white gold and can make the faint tint of a K color diamond more noticeable, so we recommend avoiding these two metal colors for K diamonds of any shape.

For Round Diamonds in Yellow Gold or Rose Gold Settings

Because round brilliant cut diamonds hide color better than other shapes, the K color can be an excellent choice when set in yellow gold or rose gold rings. Even though K color diamonds carry a slight color, the round brilliant facet pattern disguises some of the color. 

Still, we recommend a yellow gold or rose gold setting, because with a lighter metal color like white gold or platinum, the tint of a K color round brilliant can still be seen with the naked eye. 

Opting for a K color diamond allows you to save some of your budget, either for a better cut quality or higher carat weight. Because cut quality impacts a diamond’s beauty more than any other feature, a well-chosen K color diamond can allow you to have a gorgeous diamond ring at a phenomenal price point.

K color diamond ring

Certain Diamond Shapes in Yellow Gold or Rose Gold Settings

A K color diamond can be an excellent value for round brilliant diamonds set in yellow or rose gold. Because higher graded diamonds will look slightly yellowish in yellow gold anyway, it can be beneficial to save your budget and choose a K color diamond.

You can also choose a K color diamond for other shapes set in yellow or rose metals, but not all shapes are a good choice. Some diamond shapes show color more easily than round brilliants. Even in a rose gold or yellow gold setting, a K color diamond in certain shapes might show too much tint.

If you want a shape other than a round brilliant, consider emerald, asscher and princess cuts. Besides round brilliants, these diamond shapes conceal color the best. With a K color grade, they can still look white when placed in a yellow gold setting. For example, this gorgeous yellow gold solitaire ring from James Allen showcases a beautiful 1.31 carat K color princess cut.

For all other diamond shapes, including cushion cuts and radiant cuts, color is more noticeable. A K color diamond in these shapes will likely have a noticeable tint no matter the setting color. That’s why we recommend choosing a better color grade, such as J or I, for yellow and rose gold settings. Cushion cut and radiant cut diamonds with a J or better color grade can still look white when placed in a yellow gold or rose gold setting. For example, this gorgeous yellow gold solitaire ring from James Allen showcases a beautiful 0.91 carat J color radiant cut.

You can also check out our diamond shape guide for color recommendations for each shape while still getting a good value. 

Not certain which color grade and shape combination is best for your budget? Contact us for personalized help.

K color diamonds and halo, pavé and side-stone settings

The setting style you choose also impacts how a K color diamond appears. With a solitaire setting, the center diamond is the only diamond. But in other settings, such as a halo or three-stone setting, the other diamonds play a role in how the center diamond looks. 

For instance, if you have a ring with side stones, it’s important to check the color grade of the smaller diamonds. If they have a higher color grade such as H or I, they could make a K color diamond appear darker when side by side. For instance, placing a K color diamond in a side-stone engagement ring like this one from James Allen next to the smaller G-H color stones would make the K diamond look yellow in comparison. 

With three-stone, pavé, halo and side-stone settings, especially those with large enough side stones to be certified, we recommend the side diamonds always match the color of the center stone or be slightly darker. This can be a particular challenge for K color center diamonds, as many settings use G, H, I or even higher color grade side stones. 

For K color diamonds, it’s best to consider settings without additional stones, such as solitaire, bezel, tension or cathedral settings. For instance, this rose gold nouveau solitaire setting from James Allen would be stunning with a K color diamond, along with this yellow gold bezel ring. 

If you like a setting with side stones, such as a halo or pavé band, you may want to up the color grade of your center diamond and choose an H or I color center stone.

Best K Colored Diamond Rings in Yellow Gold

0.50 Carat Yellow Gold Ring

This gorgeous 0.52ct K SI1 round diamond from Blue Nile in this 14K yellow gold East-West solitaire engagement ring setting

1 Carat Yellow Gold Rings

This 1.00ct K VS1 princess cut diamond from James Allen in this beautiful 14K yellow gold cross prong solitaire setting

1.50  Carat Yellow Gold Rings

This 1.50ct K VS1 round cut diamond from James Allen in this floral 14K yellow gold Modern Tulip solitaire engagement ring setting

2 Carat Yellow Gold Rings

This 2.06ct K VVS1 emerald cut diamond from James Allen in this special Twisted Shank Contemporary solitaire setting

How do I choose a K color diamond?

Choose a high-quality K color diamond by paying attention to shape, cut grade and clarity. 

  1. Select a shape that’s appealing to you. Round brilliants, emerald, asscher and princess cuts are all great choices for K color diamonds that will be set in yellow or rose gold. 
  2. Ensure that the diamond’s cut is excellent or ideal. A diamond’s cut impacts its beauty and brilliance more than any other feature. 
  3. Look for a diamond that is eye-clean. In general, we recommend looking at diamonds graded between SI1 and VS1. They will be clean to the naked eye but cost much less than higher-graded diamonds.

By following these tips, you’ll find a stunning K color diamond for your engagement ring.

Conclusion

K color diamonds can be a stunning and affordable choice, provided they’re set in a yellow or rose gold setting. Round brilliant K color diamonds are the best choice for shape because they conceal color the best, but a princess cut or emerald/asscher can also work. 

Solitaire settings or other settings without side stones, such as a solitaire cathedral or bezel setting, are best for K color diamonds. The center diamond stands alone and isn’t placed next to smaller stones with better color grades. In these ring styles, a K color diamond can save you hundreds or thousands in your budget, depending on the carat weight, cut quality and clarity grade.

By choosing a K color diamond for your rose gold or yellow gold ring, you can spend more of your budget on cut quality or carat weight. Or simply save more for your wedding, honeymoon or future together. 

For help finding a stunning K color diamond or deciding which color grade is best for your ring style, contact us. Our diamond experts can help you find the best quality diamond for your budget and style.

About the author

Michael Fried

Michael Fried

Mike learned the diamond business from the ground-up at Leo Schachter Diamonds - one of the world's top diamond manufacturers. He has been recognized as a diamond industry expert by Time, People, Money, The Daily Mirror, NerdWallet, The Times Herald, Yahoo Finance Australia, The Art of Charm, The Washington Diplomat, The Next Web, and more.

James Allen James AllenJames Allen is the leader in online diamond sales. Their imaging technology is the same as inspecting a diamond with a jeweler's loupe. They have the largest exclusive loose diamond inventory online and fantastic prices. They also have the nicest collection of lab created diamonds online. Save 10% off select Lab Grown Diamonds and 25% on setttings!

Click to Visit

What we love about them:

  • No questions asked returns within 30 days of shipment. James Allen will send you a paid shipping label to return the ring.
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • Free International Shipping
  • Free prong tightening, repolishing, rhodium plating and cleaning every 6 months
  • Provide insurance appraisals
  • One free resizing within 60 days of purchase
  • Free ring inscriptions
  • Best-in-class high quality imagery of all diamonds in stock
  • 24/7 Customer Service
  • Best-in-class packaging
Arrow down
Arrow up

Blue Nile Blue NileBlue Nile is the largest and most well known internet jewelry seller. They have a very large exclusive online inventory. Their high quality images are catching up to James Allens' and their prices are amazing. Blue Nile have generously offered our readers an exclusive one-time use coupon. (Click Here to save $100 off engagement ring settings)

Click to Visit

What we love about them:

  • No questions asked returns within 30 days of shipment. Blue Nile will send you a paid shipping label to return the ring.
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • Free Shipping
  • Free prong tightening, repolishing, rhodium plating and cleaning every 6 months
  • Provide insurance appraisal
  • One free resizing within the first year of purchase
  • High quality images of about half of their diamonds
  • 24/7 Customer Service
  • 100% credit towards future upgrades (must be at least double in value)
  • Best in class fulfillment
Arrow down
Arrow up

Still afraid of getting ripped off?

Before you buy a diamond, get personal buying advice from industry veterans. We'll help you get the best diamond for the money.

Ask your diamond purchase question here

DISCLAIMER: We don't use your email for marketing. Period.

Sours: https://www.diamonds.pro/education/k-color-diamonds/
Understanding GIA Diamond Color Part 2: What Diamond Color Is

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