Getting started with aws cli

Getting started with aws cli DEFAULT

How to Use & Install the AWS CLI

What is the AWS CLI? |

The AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) is for managing your AWS services from a terminal session on your own client, allowing you to control and configure multiple AWS services and implement a level of automation.

If you’ve been using AWS for some time and feel comfortable clicking your way through all the services, you may have noticed that there’s more to AWS than the default eye-catching browser console. Using the AWS CLI can help you to unlock further potential when managing your AWS environment. The AWS CLI is a unified tool to manage your AWS services from a terminal session on your own client. With just one tool to download and configure, you can control multiple AWS services from the command line and automate them through scripts.

In this blog, I will show you how to use the AWS CLI and how to install it on your Windows, Linux, Mac, or Unix Operating System. To see the process to configure the AWS CLI in action, check out our beginnerIntroduction to the AWS CLI Hands-on Lab. During this Lab, you’ll learn how to configure the AWS CLI, leverage the built-in help tool, and set up an S3 website using the AWS CLI. The more you use the AWS CLI, the more you’ll see how powerful it is.

Cloud Academy AWS CLI LabAWI CLI Lab

Downloading and installing the AWS CLI

First, you need to download the AWS CLI. Depending on your operating system, it will require a different method.

Linux / macOS / Unix

Prerequisites:

You must ensure that you have at least Python 2 version 2.6.5+ or Python 3 version 3.3+ installed. To verify your current version, run the command:

python --version

Installation:

The recommendation for installing the AWS CLI is to use the bundled installer provided by AWS. The bundled installer includes all dependencies required for the installation.

1. To begin the installation run the following command:

curl "https://s3.amazonaws.com/aws-cli/awscli-bundle.zip" -o "awscli-bundle.zip"

2. Next, you must unzip the downloaded package from step 1:

unzip awscli-bundle.zip

3. Once the package in unzipped, you can run the installation:

sudo ./awscli-bundle/install -i /usr/local/aws -b /usr/local/bin/aws

Using the -b option allows all users to use the AWS CLI from any directory, meaning you will not need to specify the install directory in the user’s $PATH variable. 

Windows

Prerequisites:

You must be running Microsoft Windows XP or later.

Installation:

There are three MSI installers to choose from:

1. Select the option required to download the MSI

2. Run the downloaded MSI installer or the CLI setup file, as required

3. Follow the instructions that appear

Once installed, the program files will be stored as shown:

64-bit version

C:\Program Files\Amazon\AWSCLI

32-bit version

C:\Program Files (x86)\Amazon\AWSCLI

To confirm the installation, use the aws –version command at a command prompt. 

Simple configuration of the AWS CLI

Once you have installed the AWS CLI, you now need to configure the application to be able to connect to your AWS account.  To do so, enter the following from your command prompt:

aws configure

Through aws configure, the AWS CLI will prompt you for four pieces of information. The first two are required. These are your AWS access key ID and AWS secret access key, which serve as your account credentials. You can generate new credentials within AWS Identity and Access Management (IAM) if you do not already have them. The other information you will need is region and output format, which you can leave as default for the time being.

aws configure AWS Access Key ID [None]: AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE AWS Secret Access Key [None]: wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY Default region name [None]: us-west-2 Default output format [None]: json

The default region name simply defines the Region where you requests will be sent to. For all available regions, please see the following: Regions and Endpoints. 

The default output format specifies how the results are formatted. Values that can be used here include: 

The AWS access key ID and AWS secret access key are used to authenticate your AWS account. This authorizes you to carry out specific tasks and functions as defined by your permissions level.  

The AWS access key ID is made up of 20 random uppercase alphanumeric characters, such as the one displayed on screen.

The AWS secret access key is made up of 40 random upper and lowercase alphanumeric and non-alphanumeric characters as displayed.

These access keys can be created for any IAM user who requires authentication from a programmatic perspective, such as when using the AWS CLI.


IMPORTANT: When the access keys are created, you are prompted to download and save the details. The secret access key ID will only be displayed once, and if you lose it, then you’ll have to delete the associated access key ID and recreate new keys for the user.


It’s worth noting that it’s not possible to retrieve lost secret access key IDs as AWS does not retain copies of these for security reasons in case they were compromised. By associating the access keys with the AWS CLI, it ensures that all API requests made to AWS are signed with a digital signature.

You can use the IAM service for creating new access keys for your users. To dive deeper into this service and other authentication and access control mechanisms, go to AWS: Overview of AWS Identity & Access Management (IAM) and Understanding of AWS Authentication, Authorization & Accounting. 

AWS IAM Course

Next steps

With the AWS CLI now installed and configured on your client, you can take the next steps to configuring, managing, and scripting AWS services.

For more commands relating to the AWS CLI, take a look at the officialAWS CLI documentation.

Sours: https://cloudacademy.com/blog/how-to-use-aws-cli/

aws-cli

Build Status

This package provides a unified command line interface to Amazon Web Services.

Jump to:

Getting Started

This README is for the AWS CLI version 1. If you are looking for information about the AWS CLI version 2, please visit the v2 branch.

Requirements

The aws-cli package works on Python versions:

  • 3.6.x and greater
  • 3.7.x and greater
  • 3.8.x and greater
  • 3.9.x and greater
  • 3.10.x and greater

On 01/15/2021 deprecation for Python 2.7 was announced and support was dropped on 07/15/2021. To avoid disruption, customers using the AWS CLI on Python 2.7 may need to upgrade their version of Python or pin the version of the AWS CLI. For more information, see this blog post.

On 10/29/2020 support for Python 3.4 and Python 3.5 was deprecated and support was dropped on 02/01/2021. Customers using the AWS CLI on Python 3.4 or 3.5 will need to upgrade their version of Python to continue receiving feature and security updates. For more information, see this blog post.

Attention!

We recommend that all customers regularly monitor theAmazon Web Services Security Bulletins websitefor any important security bulletins related to aws-cli.

Maintenance and Support for CLI Major Versions

The AWS CLI version 1 was made generally available on 09/02/2013 and is currently in the full support phase of the availability life cycle.

For information about maintenance and support for SDK major versions and their underlying dependencies, see the Maintenance Policy section in the AWS SDKs and Tools Shared Configuration and Credentials Reference Guide.

Installation

Installation of the AWS CLI and its dependencies use a range of packaging features provided by and . To ensure smooth installation, it's recommended to use:

  • : 9.0.2 or greater
  • : 36.2.0 or greater

The safest way to install the AWS CLI is to use pip in a :

$ python -m pip install awscli

or, if you are not installing in a , to install globally:

$ sudo python -m pip install awscli

or for your user:

$ python -m pip install --user awscli

If you have the aws-cli package installed and want to upgrade to the latest version you can run:

$ python -m pip install --upgrade awscli

This will install the aws-cli package as well as all dependencies.

Note

On macOS, if you see an error regarding the version of that came with in El Capitan, use the option:

$ sudo python -m pip install awscli --ignore-installed six

On Linux and Mac OS, the AWS CLI can be installed using a bundled installer. The AWS CLI can also be installed on Windows via an MSI Installer.

If you want to run the branch of the AWS CLI, see the Development Version section of the contributing guide.

See the installation section of the AWS CLI User Guide for more information.

Configuration

Before using the AWS CLI, you need to configure your AWS credentials. You can do this in several ways:

  • Configuration command
  • Environment variables
  • Shared credentials file
  • Config file
  • IAM Role

The quickest way to get started is to run the command:

$ aws configure AWS Access Key ID: MYACCESSKEY AWS Secret Access Key: MYSECRETKEY Default region name [us-west-2]: us-west-2 Default output format [None]: json

To use environment variables, do the following:

$ export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=<access_key> $ export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=<secret_key>

To use the shared credentials file, create an INI formatted file like this:

[default] aws_access_key_id=MYACCESSKEY aws_secret_access_key=MYSECRETKEY [testing] aws_access_key_id=MYACCESKEY aws_secret_access_key=MYSECRETKEY

and place it in (or in on Windows). If you wish to place the shared credentials file in a different location than the one specified above, you need to tell aws-cli where to find it. Do this by setting the appropriate environment variable:

$ export AWS_SHARED_CREDENTIALS_FILE=/path/to/shared_credentials_file

To use a config file, create an INI formatted file like this:

[default] aws_access_key_id=<default access key> aws_secret_access_key=<default secret key> # Optional, to define default region for this profile. region=us-west-1 [profile testing] aws_access_key_id=<testing access key> aws_secret_access_key=<testing secret key> region=us-west-2

and place it in (or in on Windows). If you wish to place the config file in a different location than the one specified above, you need to tell the AWS CLI where to find it. Do this by setting the appropriate environment variable:

$ export AWS_CONFIG_FILE=/path/to/config_file

As you can see, you can have multiple defined in both the shared credentials file and the configuration file. You can then specify which profile to use by using the option. If no profile is specified the profile is used.

In the config file, except for the default profile, you must prefix each config section of a profile group with . For example, if you have a profile named "testing" the section header would be .

The final option for credentials is highly recommended if you are using the AWS CLI on an EC2 instance. IAM Roles are a great way to have credentials installed automatically on your instance. If you are using IAM Roles, the AWS CLI will find and use them automatically.

In addition to credentials, a number of other variables can be configured either with environment variables, configuration file entries, or both. See the AWS Tools and SDKs Shared Configuration and Credentials Reference Guide for more information.

For more information about configuration options, please refer to the AWS CLI Configuration Variables topic. You can access this topic from the AWS CLI as well by running .

Basic Commands

An AWS CLI command has the following structure:

$ aws <command> <subcommand> [options and parameters]

For example, to list S3 buckets, the command would be:

$ aws s3 ls

To view help documentation, use one of the following:

$ aws help $ aws <command> help $ aws <command> <subcommand> help

To get the version of the AWS CLI:

$ aws --version

To turn on debugging output:

$ aws --debug <command> <subcommand>

You can read more information on the Using the AWS CLI chapter of the AWS CLI User Guide.

Command Completion

The aws-cli package includes a command completion feature for Unix-like systems. This feature is not automatically installed so you need to configure it manually. To learn more, read the AWS CLI Command completion topic.

Getting Help

The best way to interact with our team is through GitHub. You can open an issue and choose from one of our templates for guidance, bug reports, or feature requests.

You may find help from the community on Stack Overflow with the tag aws-cli or on the AWS Discussion Forum for CLI. If you have a support plan with AWS Support, you can also create a new support case.

Please check for open similar issues before opening another one.

The AWS CLI implements AWS service APIs. For general issues regarding the services or their limitations, you may find the Amazon Web Services Discussion Forums helpful.

More Resources

Sours: https://github.com/aws/aws-cli
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The AWS Command Line Interface (CLI) is a unified tool to manage your AWS services. With just one tool to download and configure, you can control multiple AWS services from the command line and automate them through scripts.

The AWS CLI v2 offers several new features including improved installers, new configuration options such as AWS Single Sign-On (SSO), and various interactive features. 

 

Windows
Download and run the 64-bit Windows installer.

MacOS
Download and run the MacOS PKG installer.

Linux
Download, unzip, and then run the Linux installer

Amazon Linux
The AWS CLI comes pre-installed on Amazon Linux AMI.

Release Notes
Check out the Release Notes for more information on the latest version.

aws-shell is a command-line shell program that provides convenience and productivity features to help both new and advanced users of the AWS Command Line Interface. Key features include the following.

  • Fuzzy auto-completion for
    • Commands (e.g. ec2, describe-instances, sqs, create-queue)
    • Options (e.g. --instance-ids, --queue-url)
    • Resource identifiers (e.g. Amazon EC2 instance IDs, Amazon SQS queue URLs, Amazon SNS topic names)
  • Dynamic in-line documentation
    • Documentation for commands and options are displayed as you type
  • Execution of OS shell commands
    • Use common OS commands such as cat, ls, and cp and pipe inputs and outputs without leaving the shell
  • Export executed commands to a text editor

To find out more, check out the related blog post on the AWS Command Line Interface blog.

$ aws ec2 describe-instances

$ aws ec2 start-instances --instance-ids i-1348636c

$ aws sns publish --topic-arn arn:aws:sns:us-east-1:546419318123:OperationsError --message "Script Failure"

$ aws sqs receive-message --queue-url https://queue.amazonaws.com/546419318123/Test

You can get help on the command line to see the supported services,

the operations for a service,

and the parameters for a service operation.

$ aws autoscaling create-auto-scaling-group help

New file commands make it easy to manage your Amazon S3 objects. Using familiar syntax, you can view the contents of your S3 buckets in a directory-based listing.

$ aws s3 ls s3://mybucket

        LastWriteTime            Length Name

        ------------             ------ ----

                                PRE myfolder/

2013-09-03 10:00:00           1234 myfile.txt

You can perform recursive uploads and downloads of multiple files in a single folder-level command. The AWS CLI will run these transfers in parallel for increased performance.

$ aws s3 cp myfolder s3://mybucket/myfolder --recursive

upload: myfolder/file1.txt to s3://mybucket/myfolder/file1.txt

upload: myfolder/subfolder/file1.txt to s3://mybucket/myfolder/subfolder/file1.txt

A sync command makes it easy to synchronize the contents of a local folder with a copy in an S3 bucket.

$ aws s3 sync myfolder s3://mybucket/myfolder --exclude *.tmp

upload: myfolder/newfile.txt to s3://mybucket/myfolder/newfile.txt

Sours: https://aws.amazon.com/cli/
AWS CLI on Amazon EC2 Tutorial

Step 3.1: Set Up the AWS Command Line Interface (AWS CLI)

Add a named profile for the administrator user in the AWS CLI config file. You use this profile when running the AWS CLI commands. For more information about named profiles, see Named Profiles in the AWS Command Line Interface User Guide.

For a list of available AWS Regions and those supported by Amazon Polly, see Regions and Endpoints in the Amazon Web Services General Reference.

Note

If you're using the Region supported by Amazon Polly that you specified when you configured the AWS CLI, omit the following line from the AWS CLI code examples.

Sours: https://docs.aws.amazon.com/polly/latest/dg/setup-aws-cli.html

Cli getting started with aws

AWS CLI: A Beginners Guide

(Update) We recommend reading How to Use AWS CLI blog post if you’re interested in learning more about AWS CLI. Also, the Cloud Academy’s AWS CLI Course is your go-to course if you want to start studying this topic.


The AWS CLI is for managing your AWS services from a terminal session on your own PC, allowing you to control and script multiple AWS services.

So you’ve got yourself an AWS account and, after a few months, you’re feeling pretty comfortable clicking your way through all the services. But you definitely get the feeling that there may be a little more to this AWS thing than their eye-catching browser console.

Maybe it’s time you checked out the AWS CLI (Command Line Interface).  The AWS CLI is a unified tool to manage your AWS services from a terminal session on your own PC. With just one tool to download and configure, you can control multiple AWS services from the command line and automate them through scripts. In this article, I will show you how to install the AWS CLI on your Windows PC or on a Linux, Mac, or Unix Operating System.

The more you use the AWS CLI, the more you’ll see how powerful it is. Cloud Academy has a terrific course on the AWS CLI that can guide you through some of the interface’s more sophisticated uses. In any case, here’s how it works:

AWS CLI setup: Download and installation on Windows

  1. Download the appropriate MSI installer.

    Note

    The 64-bit version of the AWS CLI does not currently work with Windows Server 2008 (version 6.0.6002). Please use the 32-bit installer with this version of Windows.

  2. Run the downloaded MSI installer.
  3. Follow the instructions that appear.

Confirm the installation

To confirm the installation, use the  command at a command prompt (open the START menu and search for “cmd” if you’re not sure how to find the command prompt).
64 Bit
The CLI installs to C:\Program Files\Amazon\AWSCLI

C:\Program Files\Amazon\AWSCLI>aws --version aws-cli/1.7.24 Python/2.7.9 Windows/8

32 Bit
The CLI installs to C:\Program Files (x86)\Amazon\AWSCLI

C:\Program Files (x86)\Amazon\AWSCLI>aws --version aws-cli/1.7.24 Python/2.7.9 Windows/7

OK. That was pretty easy. However, we’ve only installed AWS CLI on your PC. To be able to connect to your AWS account, you’ll need one more step.
For Windows, in my opinion, the…

aws configure

…command is the fastest way to set up your AWS CLI installation.

Through aws configure, the AWS CLI will prompt you for four pieces of information. The AWS Access Key ID and AWS Secret Access Key are your account credentials. Those you will definitely need to provide. You can probably leave the other two – region and output format – as default for the time being.

aws configure AWS Access Key ID [None]: AKIAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE AWS Secret Access Key [None]: wJalrXUtnFEMI/K7MDENG/bPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY Default region name [None]: us-west-2 Default output format [None]: json

That should be it. Try out the following command from your cmd prompt and, if you have any s3 buckets, you should see them listed

aws s3 ls

Install the AWS CLI on Linux, Mac or Unix Operating System

Prerequisites 

  • Linux, OS X, or Unix
  • Python 2.6.3 or later

Check your Python installation:

$ python --version

If your computer doesn’t already have Python installed, or you would like to install a different version of Python, follow the procedure in Install Python.

Follow these steps from the command line to install the AWS CLI

$ curl "https://s3.amazonaws.com/aws-cli/awscli-bundle.zip" -o "awscli-bundle.zip" $ unzip awscli-bundle.zip $ sudo ./awscli-bundle/install -i /usr/local/aws -b /usr/local/bin/aws

Add your Access Key ID and Secret Access Key to ~/ using this format:

[default] aws_access_key_id = <access key id> aws_secret_access_key = <secret access key> region = us-east-1

Protect the config file:

Optionally, you can set an environment variable pointing to the config file. This is especially important if you want to keep it in a non-standard location. For future convenience, also add this line to your ~/.bashrc file:

That should be it. Try out the following from your command prompt and if you have any s3 buckets you should see them listed:

aws s3 ls

Here is the basic AWS CLI command structure. Keep in mind that any commands you enter in the CLI will have this standard format:

aws <command> <subcommand> [options and parameters*]

*Parameters can take various types of input values, such as numbers, strings, lists, maps, and JSON structures.

How to use AWS CLI

So, hopefully, you now have the AWS CLI installed on your PC. What next? Maybe the first thing would be to get a CLI-driven feel for what you have on your S3 account.

Here are some suggestions:

List all your users and display the output in a table:

aws iam list-users --output table

List all your EC2 tags:

aws ec2 describe-tags --output table

Play around with outputs, help, or whatever:

aws ec2 describe-spot-price-history helpaws ec2 describe-instances
Sours: https://cloudacademy.com/blog/aws-cli-a-beginners-guide/
AWS re:Invent 2020: AWS CloudShell: The fastest way to get started with AWS CLI

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