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  •  REAL VS GUMMY FOOD CHALLENGE FOR 24 HOURS | FUNNY MUKBANG & CRAZY SITUATION BY CRAFTY HACKS

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    REAL VS GUMMY FOOD CHALLENGE FOR 24 HOURS | FUNNY MUKBANG & CRAZY SITUATION BY CRAFTY HACKS #1

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  •  GUMMY FOOD VS REAL FOOD CHALLENGE | EATING CRAZY FOOD FOR 24 HOURS | EDIBLE CANDY & REAL FOOD

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  •  CHOCOLATE VS REAL FOOD CHALLENGE | CRAZY MUKBANG! TASTE TEST LAST TO STOP EATING WIN BY CRAFTY HACKS

    CHOCOLATE VS REAL FOOD CHALLENGE | CRAZY MUKBANG! TASTE TEST LAST TO STOP EATING WIN BY CRAFTY HACKS

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    Sours: http://stage.rimadesio.it//to/real-vs-gummy-food-challenge-for-24-hours-funny-mukbang-crazy-situation-by-crafty-hacks.xhtml

    American Mukbang: Why We Love to Watch People Eat

    Bethany Gaskin, aka Blove, sits in front of the screen with a wide smile on her face, casually chatting with her audience as she indulges in a fresh Cajun seafood boil. You can hear the cracking sound of the hard shell crab legs breaking as Blove extracts the delectable, juicy crab meat. Her loyal fanbase of over one million viewers loves watching her eat, but they also enjoy her funny running commentary. 

    Within recent years, food obsessives have turned to a new video genre taking over YouTube. It’s launched personalities with hundreds of thousands, even millions of followers. This is mukbang.

    The word mukbang is a mash-up of the Korean words “muk-ja” (let’s eat) and “bang-song” (broadcast). If you’re unfamiliar with the video genre, it’s (often) live footage of a host eating copious amounts of food in front of a camera while interacting with their audience. The trend originated in South Korea, where the videos became popular via live stream channels like Afreeca TV and Twitch. 

    It was virtually unheard of in the United States until 2015, when Fine Brothers Entertainment uploaded their video of popular YouTube stars reacting to the Korean eating shows. As a result, the term skyrocketed on Google searches with people wanting to learn more about mukbang.

    American YouTube content creators took notice and started doing their own spin on the trend. Mukbang went viral and a new crop of content creators started their own channels. Bethany Gaskin, who runs Bloveslife and Bloves ASMR Eating Her Way, has garnered over 2 million subscribers for her YouTube channels with her lively chats. She often hosts celebrity guests over a sprawling seafood boil -- a popular choice of food in the American mukbang community.

    While the trend originates from South Korea, the American iterations have some significant differences. Unlike Korean muckbangers, Americans do not typically livestream. Koreans plan their streams around dinnertime hours so viewers can feel like they are sharing a meal with a friend. And yet Americans tend to be more conversational in their videos, even though their performances are pre-recorded. This conversational aspect gives the audience a deeper connection with the host beyond the food.

    American YouTubers vary more widely in ethnic background, gender, and cultural background than Korean, of course, from Nicholas Perry, also known as Nikocado Avocado (two million subscribers) to Kim Thai’s Eat with Kim, (over 400,000 subscribers).

    Another difference is that Korean mukangers tend to eat traditional Korean dishes. In contrast, American mukbangers eat a wider variety of foods, from rare tropical fruit to ramen to smoked alligator, often based on theme challenges.

    But why are millions of people so drawn to watching perfect strangers eat in the first place? It’s a combination of sensory, psychological, social, emotional, environmental -- even neurological factors, says Rachel Herz, a neuroscientist and adjunct professor at Brown University Alpert Medical School as well as the author of Why You Eat What You Eat. Her specialty is analyzing how food triggers our senses and develops our behavior when it comes to what we like to eat.

    A big part of that neurological factor is the ASMR (autonomous sensory-motor response) mukbang videos can elicit. ASMR is commonly described as a brain-tingling feeling, and people find it very relaxing. The familiar sounds of eating (slurping, chewing) and the imagery of mukbang videos supposedly trigger ASMR for many viewers.

    “The sound has a huge impact [and] is an extremely [important] aspect of it because you are not getting the sensory piece part of the experience yourself,” says Herz.

    This genre has proven to be very lucrative for content creators, often earning them sponsorships from popular food chains and restaurants in exchange for the exposure. According to NPR, Korean mukbang hosts reportedly can earn up to $10,000 per month and that standard is quickly traveling to America, with brands like DoorDash and Popeye’s Chicken sponsoring the most popular YouTubers. Kim Thai, for example, has been earning upwards of $100,000 a year.

    The trend has not come without its criticism, however, with many saying that mukbang triggers those with eating disorders, and that vulnerable viewers could potentially develop unhealthy eating habits from watching. YouTuber Nicholas Perry has received criticism from viewers over abusive behavior and raised concerns over his mental health. He later revealed in a podcast interview that he left mukbang to focus on a vegan lifestyle and minimize the health concerns that came from his extreme eating.

    For YouTubers, chasing mukbang stardom means taking on a high-calorie diet, which can cause health problems. Registered dietician and wellness YouTuber Abbey Sharp has been very critical about the mukbang wave. In a viral video she condemns the negative side effects.

    She points out that Korean-style mukbang is focused much more on the companionship of sharing a meal. In her video she says, “what I do have a problem with is that Americans have appropriated this concept of mukbang to no longer be about companionship, but rather to these over-the-top, sensationalized eating challenges,” which in a clinical setting would constitute disordered eating.

    Sharp doesn’t like the “restrict, binge, repent, repeat” cycle of American mukbang. And she’s concerned that because many mukbangers look thin (and even, in some cases, produce wellness content in other videos), this reinforces double standards for eating behaviors for thin people versus fat people. “We cannot judge a book by its cover when it comes to their health and wellness.” 

    Herz has a more nuanced take. "It can work in both ways. Someone with a binge eating disorder may [feel triggered] to start gorging on something. But at the same time, the vicarious experience of watching could resolve that urge for them to binge," she explained to Thrillist. “It would depend on the person and how these triggers affect them.”

    Food culture in the United States is complicated, to say the least. It seems like half of us are devoted to a healthy lifestyle with exercise and a nutrient-dense diet, while the other half of us are caught up in patterns of overconsumption, particularly of highly-processed, low-nutrient foods. Americans love food and we consume a lot of it. As our habits change and we spend more and more of our social engagement on social media, it’s only a matter of time before it affects our behavior around food. Despite the criticism, American mukbang continues to thrive on the Internet and it doesn’t look like it’s slowing down anytime soon.

    Sign up here for our daily Thrillist email, get Eatmail for more food coverage, and subscribe here for our YouTube channel to get your fix of the best in food/drink/fun.

    Dana Givens is a Thrillist contributor.

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    Sours: https://www.thrillist.com/eat/nation/what-is-mukbang
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    What is 'mukbang'? Inside the viral Korean food YouTube trend

    For years, people have been heading to YouTube to spend upwards of 60 minutes at a time to watch strangers consume 4,000 or more calories in one sitting. Not only that, many of these viewers are paying to indulge in this binge-viewing, binge-eating privilege. Today, this viral trend is only growing in the U.S.

    What does mukbang mean?

    It’s called mukbang (pronounced "mook-bong"), and it translates to “eating broadcast” in South Korea, where professional mukbangers can make up to $10,000 a month — not including sponsorships from food and drink brands.

    Simon Stawski, a Canadian blogger who co-founded Eat Your Kimchi, moved to South Korea in 2008. Mukbanging first came onto his radar in 2014, but it wasn’t until 2015 that it became the kind of phenomenon that crosses continents.

    “In Korea, it’s not common for people to go out to eat by themselves,” Stawski told TODAY Food in 2018. “Dining is a social activity, and you don’t sit and eat alone. For those that can’t eat with others, they’ll more than likely stay home to eat alone, but they’ll still have the urge to socialize while eating, which is what I think mukbangers replicate.”

    Why do people watch mukbang?

    A big part of the mukbanging experience is the potential ASMR component. ASMR stands for “autonomous sensory meridian response” and people who experience this phenomenon claim they receive immense pleasure from watching or listening to everyday habits like whispering, hair brushing, folding clothes and more. ASMR artists, such as American YouTuber Trisha Paytas, often perform in videos with food, and sounds like slurping, chewing, crunching and many other noises emitted while eating, give many devotees the "tingles." For mukbang fans like Sammy Bosch, who admits she initially thought watching and listening to other people eat was weird, it’s almost hypnotic.

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    “I prefer the seafood, crab and ramen videos,” Bosch told TODAY in 2018, who credits the videos for helping curb her hunger and relieve her stress. “While watching others eat rich food you can fantasize that you are eating it. For me, I associate food with pleasure. So, watching these videos makes me feel happy.”

    It’s people like Bosch (and celebrities like Lisa Rinna's model daughters, who admitted to watching mukbang on this season's "The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills") who keep mukbangers like Christi Caston in business. Caston, a Texas native, is the host of YummyBitesTV, an “ASMR/mukbang” YouTube channel where she claims she makes twice as much money as she made working a 9-to-5. “I mukbang every day,” Caston told TODAY, “And I make a comfortable living from it.”

    Mukbangers may chow down on everything from dozens of bowls of ramen, to buckets of KFC, multiple pizzas, piles of crab legs, pails of candy and even heaping helpings of salad.

    But how much are these YouTubers really making?

    "It really depends on how you use your platform," Soo Tang, whose YouTube channel, MommyTang, has over 496,000 subscribers, told TODAY. Tang, like all of the top YouTubers with monetized videos, takes a share of the ad revenue generated by views. "I'm based in the U.S., so payout is different from mukbangers in Korea.

    "However, once you get popular, you can make close to $100,000 a year here in the U.S. There are many endorsements, e-book and product review payouts."

    Another popular American mukbanger, Erik Lamkin, aka Erik the Electric, told TODAY in 2018 that most of his revenue comes from YouTube ads and sponsorships. (Although he said he's never been compensated by Krispy Kreme or In-N-Out Burger, which both frequently appear in his videos.) In South Korea, mukbangers are also able to cash in on digital donations from viewers, with direct money transfers from fans.

    Lamkin, whose YouTube video "The All American 'Mukbang'" has over 627,000 views, said it’s hard to put a number on how much money he’s made in the two years since he started mukbanging about once a week. But, he can quantify how it has grown his social following. “I’ve gained about 258,000 subscribers on my YouTube Channel and almost 30,000 followers on Instagram,” said the 26-year-old who is based in California and credits cycling and powerlifting for maintaining his 180-pound weight. Now, he's amassed 1.28 million YouTube subscribers and 135,000 Instagram followers.

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    As for the most craziest thing he's ever eaten? "The most outrageous thing I've ever eaten in one sitting [was] a 12-pound burger, now called the 'Lamkinator' that I had named after me after completing it in a restaurant here in San Diego," Lamkin told TODAY. He said his foreign audience members generally like to see him eat typical American fast food items like french fries, chicken nuggets and burgers.

    But Lamkin added that when he’s not publicly eating large quantities of food, he sticks to a very healthy diet.

    Despite the sensory allure of mukbangers' videos, doctors and dietitians warn that this viral trend can be dangerous to both types of consumers.

    “Although some viewers report they watch these videos as a way to satisfy their own food cravings to help them stay on track with their weight loss plans, the nature of mukbang videos can trigger disordered eating patterns in susceptible viewers,” Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, told TODAY. And for the mukbangers themselves, there’s a plethora of risks, including triggering a heart attack and developing insulin resistance.

    Still, if the allure of getting a few more followers, and perhaps a few more dollars, has you tempted to try eating an entire pizza, then washing it all down with a giant bottle of Diet Pepsi in front of an audience, Lamkin has a few words of advice: “Be prepared for people to critique how you eat.”

    Related

    EDITOR'S NOTE (August 14, 2020, 11:30 a.m. EST): This article was originally published Feb. 23, 2018 and has since been updated with new information.

    Sours: https://www.today.com/food/what-mukbang-inside-viral-korean-food-phenomenon-t123251
    mukbang/asmr FAILS that make me laugh

    So, there isn’t a lot of research to unpack on the topic, but mukbangs share similarities with “gastro porn.” Known more colloquially as food porn, these are images of desirable foods that you might find on cooking shows, on food blogs, and on your best friend’s Instagram.

    Most of us can agree that eating is sensory as well as functional, with the visual component of food adding to or subtracting from the overall experience. “Scholars have talked of the imagined consumption of imagery as both spurring and satisfying the appetite,” Anna Lavis, Ph.D., lecturer in medical sociology and qualitative methods at the Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, tells SELF.

    Watching other people eat can trigger something Lavis, who studies how the internet impacts disordered eating behaviors, calls “eating through the other.” “Visceral viewing becomes a moment of eating from afar,” she explains.

    Lest you think mukbangs are all about watching someone devour almost unbelievably large meals, they are also about the sound: the crack of a crab leg, the slurp of soup, the crunch and munch of Flamin’ Hot Cheeto-dusted meat being pulverized by teeth, and the nearly imperceptible squish of a seafood morsel hitting a mound of cheese sauce.

    I normally despise eating sounds. I might leave a room if someone moans over their meal or stop mid-chew if I think my own eating might annoy others. Yet, somehow, listening to YouTubers crack, crunch, moan, chew, and giggle as they eat doesn’t bother me at all. It could be that I don’t freak out because we’re not actually face-to-face—I can always hit the pause button, after all—or it could be that intentionally exaggerated food sounds start to sound like something a little more pleasant.

    The joy I get from mukbangers’ eating noises could be attributed, at least in part, to the “brain tingles” that come from listening to or seeing something the brain perceives as pleasant. These tingles are known as autonomous sensory meridian responses (or ASMR). Popular ASMR videos involve people whispering, brushing hair, tapping on surfaces, or even kneading putty or slime. But there are significant differences between mukbangs and typical ASMR eating videos.

    “Mukbang is a louder and exaggerated style of eating, while ASMR-style eating is gentler and subtler,” Craig Richard, Ph.D., professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences at Shenandoah University and founder of the website ASMRUniversity, tells SELF.

    It’s not totally clear why such different sounds can both produce these brain tingles, but we might be able to just chalk it up to the diversity of human nature. “Preferences for different stimuli are a common occurrence, so it isn't surprising,” Richard says. “People generally have different preferences for foods, songs, TV shows, and fashion.”

    It would make sense that the same brain regions that cause ASMR tingles are at least partially involved in my love of mukbangs, Richard explains. But it may be less about the actual sounds than it is about the people making them and how they act. The brain regions that seem implicated in ASMR, including the prefrontal cortex and inferior frontal gyrus, are also “the brain regions that are activated when someone is receiving positive attention from another individual,” Richard says. The brain tingles I and others feel in response to these types of videos could be coming from how kind or caring these YouTubers are as they speak or eat. When these YouTubers radiate gentleness and affection through the screen, they basically mimic “affiliative behaviors,” or the loving way people treat friends and family, Richard explains. Receiving this kind of positive attention causes the brain to release feel-good chemicals like endorphins, dopamine, and oxytocin, he adds.

    Sours: https://www.self.com/story/is-it-weird-that-i-love-to-watch-mukbangers-eat-on-youtube

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