1 peter 4 8 commentary

1 peter 4 8 commentary DEFAULT

Verse-by-Verse Bible Commentary

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1 Peter 4

Above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, because love covers a multitude of sins.
New American Standard Version

Jump to: Adam Clarke CommentaryBridgeway Bible CommentaryCoffman Commentaries on the BibleAlbert Barnes' Notes on the Whole BibleCalvin's Commentary on the BibleChuck Smith Bible CommentaryExpository Notes of Dr. Thomas ConstableExpository Notes of Dr. Thomas ConstableJohn Gill's Exposition of the Whole BibleMatthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Adam Clarke Commentary

Verse 8. Have fervent charity — αγαπηνεκτενη. Intense love;for love shall cover a multitude of sins. A loving disposition leads us to pass by the faults of others, to forgive offences against ourselves, and to excuse and lessen, as far as is consistent with truth, the transgressions of men. It does not mean that our love to others will induce God to pardon our offences. James 5:20; James 5:20.

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Bibliographical Information
Clarke, Adam. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "The Adam Clarke Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/acc/1-peter-4.html. 1832.

Bridgeway Bible Commentary


Changed lives of Christ’s followers (4:1-11)

Christ’s death dealt with sin once and for all. In that sense he has nothing more to do with sin. Christians are united with Christ in his death, and therefore they too should have nothing more to do with sin. They should live no longer to please themselves but to please God (4:1-2). Christians must have no more involvement with the disgusting practices of their former days, no matter how much their reformed behaviour brings jeers and insults from their former friends (3-4).
Ungodly people must one day face divine judgment and condemnation, but in the case of believers, Christ has already borne that judgment and condemnation. The only judgment of sin that they experience is the suffering of their present physical existence, which reaches its climax in death. Those believers who are now dead believed the gospel that was preached to them while they were still living (i.e. during their earthly lives). Therefore, although they experienced physical death as one of the natural consequences of sin, they now live spiritually with God (5-6).
The final great events of the world’s history could begin at any time. Christians should be alert, but should not get over-excited. They should control themselves, pray, and act with love at all times (7-9). They should use their God-given abilities with diligence, whether in teaching God’s Word or in giving practical help to others. Above all they must work in such a way as to bring praise and glory to God (10-11).

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Flemming, Donald C. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Brideway Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bbc/1-peter-4.html. 2005.

Coffman Commentaries on the Bible

above all things being fervent in your love among yourselves; for love covereth a multitude of sins:

The approaching holocaust was to be met by Christians conscious of the community of their interests and of the deep love that each was to have for every other. A number of other very practical teachings are stressed in order that the Christian community might enter the period of fiery testing with their full moral and spiritual strength.

Love covereth a multitude of sins ... "The meaning is that love will overlook its neighbor's faults." The teaching of this is quite similar to Proverbs 10:12 and James 5:20.

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Coffman Commentaries reproduced by permission of Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. All other rights reserved.

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Coffman, James Burton. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Coffman Commentaries on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/1-peter-4.html. Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. 1983-1999.

Albert Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible

And above all things - More than all things else.

Have fervent charity among yourselves - Warm, ardent love toward each other. On the nature of charity, see the notes at 1 Corinthians 13:1. The word rendered “fervent,” means properly extended; then intent, earnest, fervent.

For charity shall cover the multitude of sins - Love to another shall so cover or hide a great many imperfections in him, that you will not notice them. This passage is quoted from Proverbs 10:12; “Love covereth all sins.” For the truth of it we have only to appeal to the experience of everyone:

  1. True love to another makes us kind to his imperfections, charitable toward his faults, and often blind even to the existence of faults. We would not see the imperfections of those whom we love; and our attachment for what we esteem their real excellencies, makes us insensible to their errors.
  2. If we love them we are ready to cover over their faults, even those which we may see in them. Of love the Christian poet says:

“Tis gentle, delicate, and kind,

To faults compassionate or blind.

The passage before us is not the same in signification as that in James 5:20, “He which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.” See the notes at that passage. That passage means, that by the conversion of another the sins of him who is converted shall be covered over, or not brought to judgment for condemnation; that is, they shall be covered over so far as God is concerned: this passage means that, under the influence of love, the sins of another shall be covered over so far as we are concerned; that is, they shall be unobserved or forgiven. The language used here does not mean, as the Romanists maintain, that “charity shall procure us pardon for a multitude of sins;” for, besides that such a doctrine is contrary to the uniform teachings of the Scriptures elsewhere, it is a departure from the obvious meaning of the passage. The subject on which the apostle is treating is the advantage of love in our conduct toward others, and this he enforces by saying that it will make us kind to their imperfections, and lead us to overlook their faults. It is nowhere taught in the Scriptures that our “charity” to others will be an atonement or expiation for our own offences. If it could be so, the atonement made by Christ would have been unnecessary. Love, however, is of inestimable value in the treatment of others; and imperfect as we are, and liable to go astray, we all have occasion to cast ourselves on the charity of our brethren, and to avail ourselves much and often of that “love which covers over a multitude of sins.”

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Barnes, Albert. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/1-peter-4.html. 1870.

Calvin's Commentary on the Bible

8 And above all things He commends charity or love as the first thing, for it is the bond of perfection. And he bids it to be fervent, or intense, or vehement, which is the same thing; for whosoever is immoderately fervent in self-love, loves others coldly. And he commends it on account of its fruit, because it buries innumerable sins, than which nothing is more desirable. But the sentence is taken from Solomon, whose words are found in Proverbs 10:12,

Hatred discovers reproaches, but love covers a multitude of sins.”

What Solomon meant is sufficiently clear, for the two clauses contain things which are set in contrast the one with the other. As then he says in the first clause that hatred is the cause why men traduce and defame one another, and spread whatever is reproachful and dishonorable; so it follows that a contrary effect is ascribed to love, that is, that men who love one another, kindly and courteously forgive one another; hence it comes that, willingly burying each other’s vices, one seeks to preserve the honor of another. (47) Thus Peter confirms his exhortation, that nothing is more necessary than to cherish mutual love. For who is there that has not many faults? Therefore all stand in need of forgiveness, and there is no one who does not wish to be forgiven.

This singular benefit love brings to us when it exists among us, so that innumerable evils are covered in oblivion. On the other hand, where loose reins are given to hatred, men by mutual biting and tearing must necessarily consume one another, as Paul says (Galatians 5:15.)

And it ought to be noticed that Solomon does not say that only a few sins are covered, but a multitude of sins, according to what Christ declares, when he bids us to forgive our brethren seventy times seven, (Matthew 18:22.) But the more sins love covers, the more evident appears its usefulness for the wellbeing of mankind.

This is the plain meaning of the words. It hence appears how absurd are the Papists, who seek to elicit from this passage their own satisfactions, as though almsgiving and other duties of charity were a sort of a compensation to God for blotting out their sins. (48) It is enough to point out by the way their gross ignorance, for in a matter so clear it would be superfluous to add many words.

(47) The quotation is from the Hebrew, and the sentence in the Sept. is evidently different. The same words are found also in James 5:20.

(48) ”Though charity, or benevolence, hides the faults of others from the severity of our censure, yet charity or almsgiving is totally unable to conceal our own from the observance of our all-righteous Judge. Indeed, the only cover for these, or to speak more properly, the discharge of all their stains, is faith, — is the blood of Christ, working with repentance towards God.” — Bishop Warburton, quoted by Bloomfield. — Ed.

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Calvin, John. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/1-peter-4.html. 1840-57.

Chuck Smith Bible Commentary

Chapter 4

Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us ( 1 Peter 4:1 )

That is, has gone to the cross.

in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that has suffered ( 1 Peter 4:1 )

Or come to the cross as far as His flesh is concerned.

hath ceased from sin ( 1 Peter 4:1 );

Now this is the same rationale that Paul had in Romans chapter six. As far as baptism is concerned, as far as my old man being crucified with Christ, dead, buried in the water of baptism; as I come up it's the resurrection, it's the new life in the Spirit. And they who are really living the new life in the Spirit have ceased from sin. Paul said, "How are we, who are dead to sin, going to live any longer therein" ( Romans 6:2 ). John tells us in his epistle, and we'll be getting that a couple of weeks, that "whosoever is born of God does not practice sin" ( 1 John 3:9 ), because we have God's seed now in us. We've been born again by the Spirit of God and we cannot practice sin.

Now if you are living a life of practicing sin, then you have better take inventory. The Bible says, "He that thinks he stands take heed lest he fall" ( 1 Corinthians 10:12 ). "There is a way that seems right unto man, but the end thereof is the way of death" ( Proverbs 14:12 ). Whosoever is born of God does not practice sin. We've been born of a new nature, not a sinful nature anymore. You can't lay it on the past, the old nature, because that nature died. And whosoever then has come to the cross has suffered and that is, co-crucifixion with Jesus. "I am crucified with Christ" ( Galatians 2:20 ). Is then dead to the old life of sin. The flesh hath ceased from sin.

That he no longer should live the rest of his life in the flesh following the lusts of men, but he is to live now to fulfill the will of God. For the time past of our life may suffice us to have wrought the will of the heathen, when we walked in lasciviousness, and lusts, in the excess of wine, in revellings, in banquetings, and abominable idolatries: Wherein they think it strange now that you do not run with them to the same excess of riot, speaking evil of you ( 1 Peter 4:2-4 ):

So it used to be that we lived the unbridled life of the flesh; a life of lasciviousness and unbridled lust, revellings, the excess of wine, banquetings, abominable idolatries. A good description of the world scene. And those that are in the world think it's strange that you don't do it anymore. What do you do for fun now, man? You ever had them ask you that? You know, what do you do for fun? You know, you don't get bombed out of your head and make a fool of yourself. So what do you do for fun? And they say, "Ah man, he's got religion, you know, he's no fun anymore." They speak evil of you. But they are going to have to give an account to God themselves. Every man must appear before God, give an account.

They're going to have to account for their lies before the One who will judge both the living and the dead. It's an awesome thing to realize that one day each man will stand before God to be judged. And those that have lived a life of riotousness, lasciviousness, are one day going to have to answer to God for a totally wasted life. What did you do with your life? And they've taken God's precious gift, the gift of life, and they've wasted it. Wasted it upon themselves, upon their own lust, their own desires.

For this cause was the gospel preached also to those that are already dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit. But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer ( 1 Peter 4:6-7 ).

The church has always lived in the consciousness that we are in the last days. And in a sense, that is always true. Every generation is the last days. I'm living in my last days, you know, I'm going to go. If the Lord doesn't come to take the church, it's going to be the last days for me one of these days. You know, who knows? Twenty, thirty, five years from now? Last days.

You know, our days are all limited. When I was a young person it seemed like, you know, life was forever; but now you begin to number your days because you want to use what time you have to the best advantage for the kingdom of God. So that's basically what Peter is saying. He's getting older now and he is coming from a more matured view. The end of all things is at hand. And it was for Peter, not long after this, he was beheaded by Nero. "Be therefore sober, watching and praying."

And above all things have fervent love among yourselves ( 1 Peter 4:8 ):

Among the body of Christ there should be a fervent love.

for love covers a multitude of sins ( 1 Peter 4:8 ).

How true that is. How many things we can just overlook if we love hard enough. How many things we don't see because we love, and how many things we can see when we hate. I mean, we watch like eagles. And every little thing we're ready to pounce on. But love fervently in the body of Christ.

Be hospitable one to another without grudging. As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God ( 1 Peter 4:9-10 ).

Now God has given to each of us gifts, and interestingly enough, there was a gift of hospitality. And there are some people who have that gift of hospitality and they make marvelous hosts and hostesses. You know, they can just have anybody in and they just have that gift of hospitality. Others don't have the gift of hospitality and it's a strain whenever people come over; they get tense, they get nervous. And if you ever seen the person with the gift of hospitality; hey, they don't worry about what they're serving, nothing bother them. They don't have to be perfect, just lay it out on the table. Everybody grab what you want, you know, and you'll feel comfortable. But those that don't have the gift, you go there and you feel strain, you know. I want to make sure you'll eat proper and spill in my shirt, you know, and you only take one of the little hors d'oeuvres and you know. And you always feel under pressure.

But we each of us have various gifts. Use your gifts for the whole body's sake, that the body might be benefited by the gifts that God has given to you, being good stewards of that which God has entrusted to you. God has given to each of us, entrusted to us gifts, abilities, talents. Now I want to be a good steward of that which God has given to me. I want to use it, use it well. It's been entrusted to me and I'm responsible.

And if any man speaks, let him speak as the oracle of God ( 1 Peter 4:11 );

Or as a spokesman for God.

if any man ministers [that is, serves], let him do it with the ability which God gives to him ( 1 Peter 4:11 ):

That's so important, you know. You can't be more than what God has enabled you to be. So just do it with the ability that God gives you and then don't worry about it. You've got to learn to just do our best and then just commit the rest. Now this is hard for a person who is a perfectionist. They do their best and then they worry about the rest. Why didn't I say this? Why didn't I do that? Oh, did I do the right thing? Oh, you know. And they're constantly worried about what they have done. Hey, was it your best? Oh my, yes you know. So, let it go. God doesn't require more than your best. So "whatsoever you do in word or deed, do all to the glory of God" ( 1 Corinthians 10:31 ). So "if you speak, speak as a spokesman for God. If you minister, do it with the ability God gives."

that God in all things may be glorified ( 1 Peter 4:11 )

You see, it isn't to bring glory to you. As we minister, we need to minister to bring glory to God.

through Jesus Christ, to whom be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen. Now beloved, don't think it's strange concerning the fiery trials which are going to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you ( 1 Peter 4:11-12 ):

Boy, one of the weirdest things happened to me the other day. I went through one of the worst trials. Hey, no, no, no; it's not strange the fact that your faith is going to be tried.

Rejoice, inasmuch as you are partakers of Christ's sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, you may be glad also with exceeding joy ( 1 Peter 4:13 ).

Jesus is coming again to be revealed in glory before the world and those that are His will, He bring with Him at His coming. Great gladness and joy, exceeding joy in that day when we come with Jesus to establish God's kingdom upon the earth. And so rejoice that we were able to suffer with Him that we might reign with Him.

If you're reproached for the name of Christ, oh, how blessed you are; for the spirit of glory and of God is resting upon you: on their part he is evil spoken of, but on your part he is glorified. But let none of you suffer as a murderer, or as a thief, or as an evildoer, or as a busybody in other men's matters ( 1 Peter 4:14-15 ).

In other words, there are things that you are blessed for suffering for, and there are things that you're not so blessed if you suffer for them. If you're a thief and you're caught and you, you know, get sent to jail, it's no big glory in that.

Yet if any man suffers as a Christian ( 1 Peter 4:16 ),

Jesus said, Persecuted for my sake and the gospel's.

let him not be ashamed; let him glorify God on this behalf ( 1 Peter 4:16 ).

And of course, in those days many of them were put in prison for being Christians. Now if you're put in prison because you're a murderer, no big glory. But if you're put into prison because you're a Christian, then you know, rejoice; that's great, that's good. Now if you were arrested for being a Christian, could they find enough evidence to convict you? Something to think about.

For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it begins with us, what shall the end be to those that obey not the gospel ( 1 Peter 4:17 )?

I mean, if God is going to judge the believer, what about those who don't even believe?

And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where will the ungodly and the sinner appear? Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator ( 1 Peter 4:18-19 ).

Now this suffering, of course, is going back, the whole context is suffering persecution because you're a child of God. And if you suffer persecution because you're a child of God, then just commit your life to God, the keeping of your souls to God. He's a faithful Creator. And you've got to just learn to just commit yourself.

Chapter 5 "



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Copyright © 2014, Calvary Chapel of Costa Mesa, Ca.

Bibliographical Information
Smith, Charles Ward. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Chuck Smith Bible Commentary". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/csc/1-peter-4.html. 2014.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

D. The Importance of Mutual Love in End-Times Living 4:7-11

To prepare his readers to meet the Lord soon, Peter urged them to make the best use of their time now that they understood what he had written about suffering.

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Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/1-peter-4.html. 2012.

Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable

In relation to their fellow Christians, Peter considered it most important that his readers keep their brotherly love at full strength (1 Peter 1:22; Romans 13:8-10; 1 Thessalonians 5:8; 1 Thessalonians 5:15; 1 John 4:7-11). The same expression occurs in non-biblical Greek to describe a horse at full gallop and a runner straining for the tape at the finish line of a race.

The person with this kind of love is willing to forgive and even covers a multitude of the sins of others committed against himself or herself rather than taking offense (Proverbs 10:12; James 5:20). We cannot compensate for our own sins by loving others. Peter was not saying that. The proper way to deal with our sins is to confess them (1 John 1:9).

"Love hides them from its own sight and not from God’s sight. Hate does the opposite; it pries about in order to discover some sin or some semblance of sin in a brother and then broadcasts it, even exaggerates it, gloats over it." [Note: Lenski, p. 195. Cf. 1 Corinthians 13:5.]

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These files are public domain.
Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Used by Permission.

Bibliographical Information
Constable, Thomas. DD. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Expository Notes of Dr. Thomas Constable". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/dcc/1-peter-4.html. 2012.

John Gill's Exposition of the Whole Bible

And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves,.... And especially for the following reason,

for charity shall cover the multitude of sins; referring to

Proverbs 10:12 not a man's own sins, but the sins of others; and not from the sight of God, for from that only the blood and righteousness of Christ cover sins, even all the sins, the whole multitude of the sins of God's elect; but from the sight of men, both of those against whom they are committed, and others; since charity, or true love, thinks no ill, but puts the best constructions upon the words and actions of fellow Christians, and does not take them up, and improve and exaggerate them, but lets them lie buried in oblivion: it takes no notice of injuries, offences, and affronts, but overlooks them, bears with them, and forgives them, so that they are never raked up, and seen any more; which prevents much scandal, strife, and trouble. The Alexandrian copy, and some others, and the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions, read, "covereth", as in

Proverbs 10:12.

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The New John Gill's Exposition of the Entire Bible Modernised and adapted for the computer by Larry Pierce of Online Bible. All Rights Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.
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Bibliographical Information
Gill, John. "Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "The New John Gill Exposition of the Entire Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/1-peter-4.html. 1999.

Matthew Henry's Complete Commentary on the Bible

Sobriety, Watchfulness, and Charity; Improvement of Talents. 66.

      7 But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.   8 And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins.   9 Use hospitality one to another without grudging.   10 As every man hath received the gift, even so minister the same one to another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God.   11 If any man speak, let him speak as the oracles of God; if any man minister, let him do it as of the ability which God giveth: that God in all things may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.

      We have here an awful position or doctrine, and an inference drawn from it. The position is that the end of all things is at hand. The miserable destruction of the Jewish church and nation foretold by our Saviour is now very near; consequently, the time of their persecution and your sufferings is but very short. Your own life and that of your enemies will soon come to their utmost period. Nay, the world itself will not continue very long. The conflagration will put an end to it; and all things must be swallowed up in an endless eternity. The inference from this comprises a series of exhortations.

      1. To sobriety and watchfulness: "Be you therefore sober,1 Peter 4:7; 1 Peter 4:7. Let the frame and temper of your minds be grave, stayed, and solid; and observe strict temperance and sobriety in the use of all worldly enjoyments. Do not suffer yourselves to be caught with your former sins and temptations, 1 Peter 4:3; 1 Peter 4:3. An watch unto prayer. Take care that you be continually in a calm sober disposition, fit for prayer; and that you be frequent in prayers, lest this end come upon you unawares," Luke 21:34; Matthew 26:40; Matthew 26:41. Learn, (1.) The consideration of our approaching end is a powerful argument to make us sober in all worldly matters, and earnest in religious affairs. (2.) Those who would pray to purpose must watch unto prayer. They must watch over their own spirits, watch all fit opportunities, and do their duty in the best manner they can. (3.) The right ordering of the body is of great use to promote the good of the soul. When the appetites and inclinations of the body are restrained and governed by God's word and true reason, and the interests of the body are submitted to the interests and necessities of the soul, then it is not the soul's enemy, but its friend and helper.

      2. To charity: And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves,1 Peter 4:8; 1 Peter 4:8. Here is a noble rule in Christianity. Christians ought to love one another, which implies an affection to their persons, a desire of their welfare, and a hearty endeavour to promote it. This mutual affection must not be cold, but fervent, that is, sincere, strong, and lasting. This sort of earnest affection is recommended above all things, which shows the importance of it, Colossians 3:14. It is greater than faith or hope, 1 Corinthians 13:13. One excellent effect of it is that it will cover a multitude of sins. Learn, (1.) There ought to be in all Christians a more fervent charity towards one another than towards other men: Have charity among yourselves. He does not say for pagans, for idolaters, or for apostates, but among yourselves. Let brotherly love continue,Hebrews 13:1. There is a special relation between all sincere Christians, and a particular amiableness and good in them, which require special affection. (2.) It is not enough for Christians not to bear malice, nor to have common respect for one another, they must intensely and fervently love each other. (3.) It is the property of true charity to cover a multitude of sins. It inclines people to forgive and forget offences against themselves, to cover and conceal the sins of others, rather than aggravate them and spread them abroad. It teaches us to love those who are but weak, and who have been guilty of many evil things before their conversion; and it prepares for mercy at the hand of God, who hath promised to forgive those that forgive others, Matthew 6:14.

      3. To hospitality, 1 Peter 4:9; 1 Peter 4:9. The hospitality here required is a free and kind entertainment of strangers and travellers. The proper objects of Christian hospitality are one another. The nearness of their relation, and the necessity of their condition in those times of persecution and distress, obliged Christians to be hospitable one to another. Sometimes Christians were spoiled of all they had, and were driven away to distant countries for safety. In this case they must starve if their fellow-christians would not receive them. Therefore it was a wise and necessary rule which the apostle here laid down. It is elsewhere commanded, Hebrews 13:1; Hebrews 13:2; Romans 12:13. The manner of performing this duty is this: it must be done in an easy, kind, handsome manner, without grudging or grumbling at the expense or trouble. Learn, (1.) Christians ought not only to be charitable, but hospitable, one to another. (2.) Whatever a Christian does by way of charity or of hospitality, he ought to do it cheerfully, and without grudging. Freely you have received, freely give.

      4. To the improvement of talents, 1 Peter 4:11; 1 Peter 4:11.

      (1.) The rule is that whatever gift, ordinary or extraordinary, whatever power, ability, or capacity of doing good is given to us, we should minister, or do service, with the same one to another, accounting ourselves not masters, but only stewards of the manifold grace, or the various gifts, of God. Learn, [1.] Whatever ability we have of doing good we must own it to be the gift of God and ascribe it to his grace. [2.] Whatever gifts we have received, we ought to look upon them as received for the use one of another. We must not assume them to ourselves, nor hide them in a napkin, but do service with them one to another in the best manner we are able. [3.] In receiving and using the manifold gifts of God we must look upon ourselves as stewards only, and act accordingly. The talents we are entrusted with are our Lord's goods, and must be employed as he directs. And it is required in a steward that he be found faithful.

      (2.) The apostle exemplifies his direction about gifts in two particulars--speaking and ministering, concerning which he gives these rules:-- [1.] If any man, whether a minister in public or a Christian in private conference, speak or teach, he must do it as the oracles of God, which direct us as to the matter of our speech. What Christians in private, or ministers in public, teach and speak must be the pure word and oracles of God. As to the manner of speaking, it must be with the seriousness, reverence, and solemnity, that become those holy and divine oracles. [2.] If any man minister, either as a deacon, distributing the alms of the church and taking care of the poor, or as a private person, by charitable gifts and contributions, let him do it as of the ability which God giveth. He who has received plenty and ability from God ought to minister plentifully, and according to his ability. These rules ought to be followed and practised for this end, that God in all things, in all your gifts, ministrations, and services, may be glorified, that others may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven (Matthew 5:16), through Jesus Christ, who has procured and given these gifts to men (Ephesians 4:8), and through whom alone we and our services are accepted of God (Hebrews 13:15), to whom, Jesus Christ, be praise and dominion for ever and ever. Amen. Learn, First, It is the duty of Christians in private, as well as ministers in public, to speak to one another of the things of God, Malachi 3:16; Ephesians 4:29; Psalms 145:10-12. Secondly, It highly concerns all preachers of the gospel to keep close to the word of God, and to treat that word as becomes the oracles of God. Thirdly, Christians must not only do the duty of their place, but they must do it with vigour, and according to the best of their abilities. The nature of a Christian's work, which is high work and hard work, the goodness and kindness of the Master, and the excellency of the reward, all require that our endeavours should be serious and vigorous, and that whatever we are called to do for the honour of God and the good of others we should do it with all our might. Fourthly, In all the duties and services of life we should aim at the glory of God as our chief end; all other views must be subservient to this, which would sanctify our common actions and affairs, 1 Corinthians 10:31. Fifthly, God is not glorified by any thing we do if we do not offer it to him through the mediation and merits of Jesus Christ. God in all things must be glorified through Jesus Christ, who is the only way to the Father. Sixthly, The apostle's adoration of Jesus Christ, and ascribing unlimited and everlasting praise and dominion to him, prove that Jesus Christ is the most high God, over all blessed for evermore. Amen.

Copyright Statement
These files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.

Bibliographical Information
Henry, Matthew. "Complete Commentary on 1 Peter 4:8". "Matthew Henry Complete Commentary on the Whole Bible". https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/1-peter-4.html. 1706.

Sours: https://www.studylight.org/commentary/1-peter/4-8.html

What Does 1 Peter 4:8 Mean?

No wonder Peter emphasised the need for us all to have a deep, heartfelt and intense love for our Lord, and a similarly deep, impassioned, fervent love for one another. Does not He Who loved us so deeply, even to the point of death on the cross, demand that we display unselfish love towards others? Is He not worthy to receive the same depth of love that He showed towards us when we were dead in sin and at enmity with God, a sacrificial love, a dedicated love, a complete, unselfish, and holy love?

Should not we who have received such a depth of love and forgiveness from our precious Saviour, not show forth His love to others? "Love one another as I have loved you," was the command Christ gave to the Church. Should not our love for one another reflect that pure, selfless love that the Lord Jesus demonstrated toward us, in that while we were yet sinners Christ died for us?

Such love does not wink at sin, nor does it translate imperfections into destructive criticism, but is gracious toward the faults of others and patient with their defects. Such love applauds the good qualities they find in others while speaking the truth in love. They encourage others in their Christian walk. They forgive past offenses. They understand their foibles and are wisely insensible of their errors.

Peter knew that God is love. He understood that he who dwells in love dwells in God, and God in him. No surprise that Peter exhorts us, "above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, for love covers a multitude of sins." When the love of God through Christ, abounds in our hearts, then the offenses of others, together with our own sins, are covered in Christlike forgiveness. A God-given, unconditional forgiveness.

As far as the east is from the west, is the distance that our Heavenly Father in His grace, has removed our transgressions from us. Surely we should cover the sins of those who sin against us and be grateful that our own, innumerable sins are also covered in Christ's forgiveness?

By faith, we have received God's eternal forgiveness. His unconditional and unrestricted forgiveness. There is nothing that can separate us from His love, for past, present, and future sins have been washed in the sea of His amazing forgiveness, and His vast ocean of forgetfulness, and we are cleansed by the Blood of the Lamb. 

Should not we who have had the sordid sins of our blackened souls washed, covered, cleansed, and eternally forgiven by our gracious God, reflect His tender-hearted forgiveness, His warm gentleness, His deep compassion and fervent love in our dealings on our brothers and sisters in Christ? Should not we above all things have fervent love one for another, knowing that the love of Christ covers a multitude of sins?

My Prayer

Heavenly Father, thank You for Your unconditional and unrestricted forgiveness. Thank You that as far as the east is from the west, is the distance that my sins have been removed from me. Thank You for this truth, that love covers a multitude of sins. I pray that I would not misuse this verse and simply tolerate all sin, or wink at sin, but love as Christ loved me, loving and forgiving in grace and truth. I pray, that I may reflect Christlikeness in all my dealings with others, so that the glory goes to You. In Jesus' name, AMEN.

Choose a Verse from 1 Peter 4

Sours: https://dailyverse.knowing-jesus.com/1-peter-4-8
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1 Peter 4 – Serving God in the Last Days

A. Attitudes for end-times believers.

1. (1-2) In the last days, Christians should have an attitude of commitment.

Therefore, since Christ suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same mind, for he who has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin, that he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh for the lusts of men, but for the will of God.

a. Since Christ suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same mind: The commitment God calls us to have is nothing greater than the commitment Jesus had in enduring suffering for our salvation. In the last days we need to have a commitment to God that will endure through great struggles.

i. Jesus communicated the same idea when He told us that anyone who would come after Him must take up his cross and follow (Matthew 16:24). Taking up the cross meant that you were absolutely committed and not looking back.

ii. Arm yourself with the same mind: Many of us are defeated in our battle against sin because we refuse to sacrifice anything in the battle. We only want victory if it comes easily to us. Jesus called us to have the kind of attitude that would sacrifice in the battle against sin (Matthew 5:29-30).

b. He who has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin: When a person suffers physical persecution for the sake of Jesus, it almost always profoundly changes their outlook regarding sin and the pursuit of the lusts of the flesh. That one is more likely to live the rest of his time in the flesh not for the lusts of men, but for the will of God.

i. “Whoever has suffered for doing right, and has still gone on obeying God in spite of the suffering it involved, has made a clear break with sin.” (Grudem)

ii. Hiebert observes that the phrase has ceased from sin “Depicts the spiritual state of the victorious sufferer. It carries a note of triumph; he has effectively broken with a life dominated by sin. It need not mean that he no longer commits any act of sin, but that his old life, dominated by the power of sin, has been terminated.”

iii. If we have not physically suffered for following Jesus Christ, we can still connect ourselves by faith to Jesus, who has suffered for us in the flesh. “I beg you to remember that there is no getting quit of sin – there is no escaping from its power – except by contact and union with the Lord Jesus Christ.” (Spurgeon)

c. He no longer should live the rest of his time: Peter gave us two time references that are helpful in having the right attitude in our following of Jesus Christ.

· First, no longer should we live in sin, and we should answer every temptation and sinful impulse with the reply, “no longer.”

· Second, we should carefully consider how to live the rest of our time. God has appointed us some further days on this earth; when each of us must answer to Him how we live this time.

2. (3-6) In the last days, Christians should live with an attitude of wisdom.

For we have spent enough of our past lifetime in doing the will of the Gentiles—when we walked in lewdness, lusts, drunkenness, revelries, drinking parties, and abominable idolatries. In regard to these, they think it strange that you do not run with them in the same flood of dissipation, speaking evil of you. They will give an account to Him who is ready to judge the living and the dead. For this reason the gospel was preached also to those who are dead, that they might be judged according to men in the flesh, but live according to God in the spirit.

a. For we have spent enough of our past lifetime in doing the will of the Gentiles: Peter realized we have all spent enough time living like the world. Now we are called to live like Christians. It is a profound and foolish waste of time for Christians to live like the world, and we must simply stop being double-minded and start living as Christians.

i. Sadly, many Christians (in their heart of hearts) think that they have not spent enough time doing the will of the ungodly. They want to experience more of the world before they make a full commitment to godliness. This is a tragic mistake and takes a path that leads away from eternal life.

b. Lewdness: This word begins a list of sins that Peter understood should only mark the past life of Christians and not the present. This word means to live without any sense of moral restraint, especially in regard to sexual immorality and violence.

i. Lewdness “denotes excesses of all kinds of evil. Involving a lack of personal self-restraint, the term pictures sin as an inordinate indulgence of appetites to the extent of violating a sense of public decency.” (Hiebert)

ii. When we look at this list (lewdness, lusts, drunkenness, revelries, drinking parties, and abominable idolatries), we see just how little fallen man has progressed in the last 2,000 years. These problems have not been solved in the time since Peter wrote this letter.

c. They think it strange that you do not run with them in the same flood of dissipation: When the world looks at our godly living, they think it strange that we do not follow them in their flood of dissipation (wastefulness). If life lived after the flesh is anything, it is a waste.

i. Speaking evil of you: When we don’t participate in the sin around us, we convict those who practice their sin, and they don’t like that – so they speak evil of us.

ii. “It does not matter how your good deeds are received by men. If you are like God, you will find them received with contempt and ingratitude.” (Meyer)

iii. “Since heathen religious ceremonies were part and parcel of ordinary life (e.g., all civic and national activities were bound up with them) the Christians were compelled to avoid what would have seemed to their fellows a wholly innocuous co-operation and to go much further than merely separate themselves from actual heathen worship.” (Best, cited in Hiebert)

d. They will give an account to Him who is ready to judge: When this account is required, all who live in the sins Peter described will clearly see how foolish they have been. Even if one seems to live the “good life” living by the world’s rules, his life will be a waste in the measure of eternity.

e. For this reason the gospel was preached also to those who are dead: Peter also says that because of this eternal judgment the gospel was preached to the dead. The righteous dead know and live on in constant awareness of the reality of eternity – and are rewarded by this understanding as they live according to God in the spirit.

i. Peter has already told us that Jesus preached to the spirits in prison, preaching a message of judgment (1 Peter 3:19). Apparently during this same time Jesus also preached a message of salvation to the faithful dead in Abraham’s Bosom (Luke 16:22) who anticipated the work of the Messiah for them. This preaching to those who are dead was not the offer of a second chance, but the completion of the salvation of those who had been faithful to God under their first chance.

ii. In doing this, Jesus fulfilled the promised that He would lead captivity captive (Psalm 68:18 and Ephesians 4:8) and He would “proclaim liberty to the captives and the opening of the prison to those who are bound” (Isaiah 61:1 and Luke 4:18).

iii. It may also be that Peter here had in mind those in the Christian community who had already died, perhaps even dying as martyrs. If this is the case then Peter used their heroic example as a way to encourage his suffering readers to also be faithful.

3. (7) In the last days, Christians should live with an attitude of serious prayer.

But the end of all things is at hand; therefore be serious and watchful in your prayers.

a. The end of all things is at hand: If we really believe that we live in the last days, it is all the more appropriate that we give ourselves to prayer (therefore be serious and watchful in your prayers).

i. “The assertion that the end of the age does indeed stand near and may break in at any time well represents the view of the early church.” (Hiebert)

ii. Many Christians who believe that Jesus is coming soon based on prophecy charts and political events fail to apply that belief in the proper way. They fail to apply themselves to more diligent prayer.

b. Therefore be serious… in your prayers: We must give ourselves to serious prayer. As we see the weight of eternity rushing towards us, we dare not take the need for prayer lightly.

c. Therefore be… watchful in your prayers: We must give ourselves to watchful prayer, primarily having our hearts and minds watching and ready for the return of Jesus Christ. But this also means watching ourselves and watching this world, measuring our readiness for Jesus’ coming.

4. (8-11) In the last days, Christians should live with an attitude of love.

And above all things have fervent love for one another, for “love will cover a multitude of sins.” Be hospitable to one another without grumbling. As each one has received a gift, minister it to one another, as good stewards of the manifold grace of God. If anyone speaks, let him speak as the oracles of God. If anyone ministers, let him do it as with the ability which God supplies, that in all things God may be glorified through Jesus Christ, to whom belong the glory and the dominion forever and ever. Amen.

a. Above all things have fervent love for one another: If these are the last days, then it is important for us to love those we are going to spend eternity with. In light of eternity, we must have fervent love for one another.

b. For “love will cover a multitude of sins”: Love does cover a multitude of sins, both the sins of the one loving and the sins of the one who is being loved.

i. “Where love abounds in a fellowship of Christians, many small offences, and even some large ones, are readily overlooked and forgotten. But where love is lacking, every word is viewed with suspicion, every action is liable to misunderstanding, and conflicts about – to Satan’s perverse delight.” (Grudem)

c. Be hospitable to one another without grumbling: Love will show itself in hospitality. Christians should often open their homes to others and doing it all without grumbling.

i. “‘Without grumbling’ is a frank recognition that the practice of hospitality could become costly, burdensome, and irritating. The Greek term denotes a muttering or low speaking as a sign of displeasure. It depicts a spirit that is the opposite of cheerfulness.” (Hiebert)

d. As each one has received a gift, minister it to one another: Love will show itself as we give to the church family what God has given us as gifts. As we do so, we are good stewards of the many-faceted (manifold) grace of God given to us.

i. In 1 Corinthians 15:10 Paul makes it clear that he was what he was only by God’s grace. But at the same time, “His grace toward me was not in vain” because Paul put his own God-inspired efforts to work with God’s grace. The idea is that if we are bad stewards of the manifold grace of God, it is as if that grace was given to us in vain. That grace is wasted, because it only comes to us and doesn’t move through us.

ii. “Manifold grace is many-coloured grace. As when a ray of light breaks into a spray of many hues, so each of us receives God’s grace at a different angle, and flashes it back broken up into some fresh colour.” (Meyer)

e. If anyone ministers, let him do it as with the ability which God supplies: Every part is important; each has its job to do. Even the smallest, seemingly least important part of the body of Christ is important.

i. A man was rebuilding the engine to his lawn mower, and when he finished, he had one small part left over, and he couldn’t remember where it went. He started the engine and it ran great, so he figured that the part was useless – until he tried to stop the lawn mower, and it wouldn’t stop! Even the smallest, seemingly least important part of the body of Christ is important.

ii. As we serve one another, we do it with the strength God provides, the ability which God supplies – so that to Him belong the glory and the dominion forever and ever.

B. Understanding your time of trial.

1. (12-13) Enduring trials with the right attitude.

Beloved, do not think it strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened to you; but rejoice to the extent that you partake of Christ’s sufferings, that when His glory is revealed, you may also be glad with exceeding joy.

a. Concerning the fiery trial which is to try you: Instead of thinking of trials (even fiery trials) as strange occurrences, we see them as ways to partake of Christ’s sufferings. And if we partake of His sufferings, we will also partake of His glory and joy.

i. Peter once told Jesus to avoid the suffering of the cross (Mark 8:32-33). “Once it seemed strange to the Apostle Peter that his Master should think of suffering. Now he thinks it strange that He could have imagined anything else.” (Meyer)

b. Partake of Christ’s sufferings: We can only partake of Jesus’ sufferings because He partook of our humanity and sufferings. He became a man and suffered so that our suffering wouldn’t be meaningless. It is good to share anything with Jesus, even His suffering.

c. Rejoice to the extent that you partake of Christ’s sufferings, that when His glory is revealed, you may also be glad with exceeding joy: Our tendency is to embrace the glory and the joy and to avoid any sharing of Jesus’ suffering. Or we morbidly fixate on the suffering and forget that it is but a necessary prelude to the glory and joy.

i. We should never deny the place of suffering in building godliness in the Christian life. Though there is much needless pain we bear through lack of knowledge or faith, there is also necessary suffering. If suffering was a suitable tool to teach Jesus (Hebrews 5:8), it is a suitable tool to teach His servants.

ii. To the extent implies a measure. Those who have suffered more in Jesus will rejoice more at His coming in glory.

2. (14-16) The difference between suffering as a Christian and suffering as an evildoer.

If you are reproached for the name of Christ, blessed are you, for the Spirit of glory and of God rests upon you. On their part He is blasphemed, but on your part He is glorified. But let none of you suffer as a murderer, a thief, an evildoer, or as a busybody in other people’s matters. Yet if anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed, but let him glorify God in this matter.

a. If you are reproached for the name of Christ: Suffering for the name of Christ is a blessing, because it shows that we really are following Jesus, and that we suffer because we are identified with Him.

b. On their part He is blasphemed, but on your part He is glorified: We expect the world to blaspheme Jesus. But He should always be glorified among Christians.

c. Let none of you suffer as a murderer, a thief, an evildoer, or as a busybody: Suffering as an evildoer is deserved and brings shame to the name of Jesus. Peter recognized that not all suffering that Christians experience is suffering in the name of Jesus.

i. We understand when Peter writes about the suffering that might come to the murderer, the thief, or the evildoer. Yet we shouldn’t be surprised that he also includes the busybody in other people’s matters. Such people do suffer a lot of grief and pain, but not for the sake of Jesus.

d. If anyone suffers as a Christian, let him not be ashamed: Suffering as a Christian is nothing to be ashamed about, even though the world may despise the suffering Christian. Instead, we should glorify God in these matters.

i. We don’t glorify God for suffering. But we do glorify Him in suffering, and we glorify Him for what He will accomplish in us and through us with the suffering.

ii. “The name ‘Christian’ (Christianos), built on the name Christ with the suffix –ianos, a Latin formation (-ianus), denotes a partisan follower… Christian categorized the followers of Christ as ‘members of the Christ-party,’ not ‘little Christ’ as some popular explanations would have it.” (Hiebert)

iii. Christians were first known as “disciples,” “believers,” “the Lord’s disciples,” or “those who belonged to the Way” before they were known as Christians, first at Acts 11:26. This is the first of three places in the New Testament where the followers of Jesus are named Christians.

· In Acts 11:26 it tells us the disciples were first called Christians in Antioch.

· In Acts 26:28 Agrippa told Paul, You almost persuade me to become a Christian. This shows that between Acts 11:26 and 26:28 Christian had become a popularized name for the followers of Jesus.

· In 1 Peter 4:16 the idea is that some are suffering because they are identified as Christians. This shows that the name had become very widely used, so much so that one could be persecuted for being numbered as a Christian.

3. (17-19) Committing your soul to God in the midst of suffering.

For the time has come for judgment to begin at the house of God; and if it begins with us first, what will be the end of those who do not obey the gospel of God? Now

“If the righteous one is scarcely saved,
Where will the ungodly and the sinner appear?”

Therefore let those who suffer according to the will of God commit their souls to Him in doing good, as to a faithful Creator.

a. For the time has come for judgment to begin at the house of God: In the context of suffering, Peter tells us that judgment begins at the house of God. Right now, God uses suffering as a judgment (in a positive, purifying sense) for Christians (the house of God).

i. It is right for judgment to begin at the house of God. “There is equity in it; for Christians profess to be better than others, and so they ought to be. They say they are regenerate, so they ought to be regenerate. They say that they are a holy people, separated unto Christ; so they ought to be holy, and separate from sinners, as he was.” (Spurgeon)

ii. Now is our time of fiery trial (1 Peter 4:12); the ungodly will have their fire later. The fire we endure now purifies us; the fire the ungodly will endure will punish them. Yet we always remember that there is never any punishment from God for us in our sufferings, only purification. For the Christian, the issue of punishment was settled once and for all at the cross, where Jesus endured all the punishment the Christian could ever face from God.

iii. The same fire that consumes straw will purify gold. The fire is the same, but its purpose in application is different, and its effect is different upon the straw and the gold. Even so, Christians do suffer some of the same things the ungodly do, yet the purpose of God is different and the effect is different.

b. If it begins with us first, what will be the end of those who do not obey the gospel of God? Peter’s sobering application is clear. If this is what God’s children experience, what will become of those who have made themselves His enemies? How can they ever hope to stand before the judgment and wrath of God?

i. Christians can rejoice that the sufferings they face in this life are the worst they will ever face throughout all eternity. We have seen the worst; those who reject Jesus Christ have seen the best of life their eternal existence will ever see.

c. If the righteous one is scarcely saved: Since this is true – that the salvation of the righteous does not come without difficulty – then it should make us pause if we ourselves or others seem to have an easy salvation.

i. It isn’t that our salvation is difficult in the sense of earning it or finding a way to deserve it; it is all the free gift of Jesus Christ. Yet our salvation is hard in the sense that the claims of discipleship challenge us and demand that we cast away our idols and our sins. Real discipleship and genuine following after Jesus Christ is sometimes a hard thing, so we understand why Peter quoted the passage from Proverbs 11:31, “the righteous one is scarcely saved.”

d. Those who suffer according to the will of God: Peter again made a distinction between those who suffer according to the will of God and those who suffer otherwise. Not all suffering is the will of God.

e. Commit their souls to Him: The ancient Greek word translated “commit” is a technical one, used for leaving money on deposit with a trusted friend. Such a trust was regarded as one of the most sacred things in life, and the friend was bound by honor to return the money intact. It is the very word Jesus used when He said, “Father, into Your hands I commit My spirit” (Luke 23:46).

i. So when Christians commit their souls to Him, they leave their souls in a safe place. God is a faithful Creator, and we can give ourselves to Him as pliable clay in His hands.

f. Faithful Creator: Much of the agony we put ourselves through in times of trial and suffering has to do with our disregard of God’s faithfulness or of His place as Creator. He is our sovereign Creator, with the right to do with us as He pleases. Yet He is faithful, and will only do what is ultimately best for us.

©2018 David Guzik – No distribution beyond personal use without permission

Sours: https://enduringword.com/bible-commentary/1-peter-4/
Living In The Light Of Christ's Return (I Peter 4)

What does it mean that love covers a multitude of sins?

Answer



First Peter 4:8 says, “Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.” Proverbs 10:12 says, “Hatred stirs up conflict, but love covers over all wrongs.” In what way does love cover sin?

To “cover” sin is to forgive it, and forgiveness is associated with love. The best example of a love that covers sin is Jesus’ sacrificial death on our behalf. Jesus’ prayer from the cross, “Father, forgive them,” says it all (Luke 23:34). Jesus’ bearing of our iniquities was an undeniable act of love (Romans 5:8; 1 John 4:10). In fact, Jesus did more than just cover our sin; He did away with it completely (Hebrews 10:12–14).

In 1 Peter 4:8 the apostle is talking about interpersonal relationships. As believers we reflect the love of God by forgiving others. Jesus told His disciples, “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another” (John 13:34–35). First Corinthians 13 tells us that love “keeps no record of wrongs” (verse 5). When we love each other, we are willing to forgive each other. Love covers sin in that it is willing to forgive.

Lovealso covers over a multitude of sins in that it does not gossip about sin. Rather than share the offenses of our brothers and sisters in Christ with anyone who will listen, we exercise discretion and restraint. Matthew 18:15–17 instructs us on the appropriate way to confront those who sin. James 5:19–20 says, “My brothers and sisters, if one of you should wander from the truth and someone should bring that person back, remember this: Whoever turns a sinner from the error of their way will save them from death and cover over a multitude of sins.” It is loving to speak truth to others regarding sin. First Corinthians 13:6 tells us that “love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth.”

Another thing love does is protect (1 Corinthians 13:7). Love does not cover over a multitude of sin by sweeping matters under the rug. Some have appealed to the forgiving nature of love in their attempt to hide indiscretion. For example, rather than report child abuse, a church might cover it up. This is not what true love does. Love protects by helping both the victim and the offender, and it also strives to prevent further offenses.

Love covering sin also does not mean we disregard our own emotions or ignore our personal boundaries. We cannot “cover” sin by denying that it hurt us. We cover sin by acknowledging it and then extending the forgiveness God has given us to others.

“Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres” (1 Corinthians 13:4–7). Another way that love covers over a multitude of sins is choosing not to take offense at everything. Some sins against us are not worth confronting. Personal slights, snide or ignorant remarks, and minor annoyances can be easily forgiven for the sake of love. Proverbs 19:11 says, “A person’s wisdom yields patience; it is to one’s glory to overlook an offense.” If we are patient, not envious or self-seeking, we are much less likely to even take offense. Acting in love means we put others before ourselves. Love can cover a multitude of sin in that, when we act in true love, we are prone to overlook minor offenses, tolerate the provocations, and forgive the sin.

Recommended Resources

Love Is: Meditations for Couples on 1 Corinthians 13 by Les & Leslie Parrott

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Related Topics

What does it mean to cast all your cares on Him (1 Peter 5:7)?

What does it mean that love is not self-seeking (1 Corinthians 13:5)?

What does it mean that love is not easily angered (1 Corinthians 13:5)?

What does it mean that judgment begins at the house of God?

How does love cover all wrongs (Proverbs 10:12)?

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Questions about 1 Peter

What does it mean that love covers a multitude of sins?
Sours: https://www.gotquestions.org/love-covers-multitude-sins.html

4 commentary peter 1 8

1 Peter 4:8
“Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.”

Explanation and Commentary of 1 Peter 4:8

Is this not what was meant by Christ when he said the greatest commandment is to love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your mind, and all your strength, and to love your neighbor as yourself (Mt 22:37-38)? In fact, he said that the whole law is summed up in these two. If one truly loves God and people, it is difficult to sin against God or people. We can only sin when we suspend our love for God and people.

Peter is speaking of the impending “end of all things” (1 Pt 4:7). He is giving instruction for the Church to stay focused on the coming of Christ. Though he has told them to be alert, sober, prayer, hospitable, generous and faithful in stewardship, it is love, above all that will keep them until the great day of the Lord when he will return to judge the earth.

The love that Peter, and Jesus before him, had in mind was the agape that characterizes the love the Father has. It is selfless but also gets something in return because when it is given, it multiplies to the giver. It is not dependent on feelings. It can be given whether it is accepted or not. And when one loves another with the love of the Father, it is considered by God as love for the Father.

Breaking Down the Key Parts of 1 Peter 4:8

#1 “Above all,”
Love is the greatest commandment. Faith and hope will not be necessary in our eternal glory in heaven, but love will remain forever because “God is love” (1 Jn 4:7). Love exists “above all,” because God is “above all.”

#2 “love each other deeply,”
To love each other deeply is easily misunderstood as an emotion. Emotion can be a part of it, but this love is an action, even more, it is an attitude about life, God, and our fellow man. It is a deep and abiding state of being that gives the Christian perfect peace and aligned him or her with God himself, who is love. “This is how we know what love is: Jesus Christ laid down his life for us. And we ought to lay down our lives for our brothers and sisters” (1 Jn 3:16).

#3 “because love covers over a multitude of sins.”
Truly, what sins can be committed when one is in a conscious state of loving God and each other with deep love? Can you hate while you love? No. Can you strike your brother? Can you lie, cheat, or steal when you believe in God and love him? No. We must suspend love and even belief in order to sin against God. To believe in him is to love him. To love him is to obey him out of joy and peace.

Bible Study on 1 Peter 4:8

Expert Overview of 1 Peter

Biblical Translations of 1 Peter 4:8

NIV
Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins.

NLT
Most important of all, continue to show deep love for each other, for love covers a multitude of sins.

ESV
Above all, keep loving one another earnestly, since love covers a multitude of sins.

KJV
And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins.

NKJV
And above all things have fervent love for one another, for “love will cover a multitude of sins.”

1 Peter 4:8 Meaning and Commentary

Author Bio
Natalie Regoli is a child of God, devoted wife, and mother of two boys. She has a Master's Degree in Law from The University of Texas. Natalie has been published in several national journals and has been practicing law for 18 years.
Categories Bible CommentarySours: https://connectusfund.org/1-peter-4-8-meaning-of-love-covers-a-multitude-of-sins
1 Peter 4:7-8

1 Peter 4:8 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Peter 4:8, NIV: "Above all, love each other deeply, because love covers over a multitude of sins."

1 Peter 4:8, ESV: "Above all, keep loving one another earnestly, since love covers a multitude of sins."

1 Peter 4:8, KJV: "And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves: for charity shall cover the multitude of sins."

1 Peter 4:8, NASB: "Above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, because love covers a multitude of sins."

1 Peter 4:8, NLT: "Most important of all, continue to show deep love for each other, for love covers a multitude of sins."

1 Peter 4:8, CSB: "Above all, maintain constant love for one another, since love covers a multitude of sins."

Sours: https://www.bibleref.com/1-Peter/4/1-Peter-4-8.html

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1 Peter 4:8

1 Peter 4:8

And above all things have fervent charity among yourselves,
&c.And especially for the following reason,

for charity shall cover the multitude of sins;
referring to ( Proverbs 10:12 ) not a man's own sins, but the sins of others; and not from the sight of God, for from that only the blood and righteousness of Christ cover sins, even all the sins, the whole multitude of the sins of God's elect; but from the sight of men, both of those against whom they are committed, and others; since charity, or true love, thinks no ill, but puts the best constructions upon the words and actions of fellow Christians, and does not take them up, and improve and exaggerate them, but lets them lie buried in oblivion: it takes no notice of injuries, offences, and affronts, but overlooks them, bears with them, and forgives them, so that they are never raked up, and seen any more; which prevents much scandal, strife, and trouble. The Alexandrian copy, and some others, and the Vulgate Latin, Syriac, and Arabic versions, read, "covereth", as in ( Proverbs 10:12 ) .

Sours: https://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/gills-exposition-of-the-bible/1-peter-4-8.html


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