Otic drops for ear infection

Otic drops for ear infection DEFAULT

ofloxacin otic

What is the most important information I should know about ofloxacin otic?

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

What is ofloxacin otic?

Ofloxacin is an antibiotic that treats infections caused by bacteria.

Ofloxacin otic (for the ear) is used to treat infections of the ear canal in adults and children who are at least 6 months old. Ofloxacin otic is used in adults and children at least 1 year old to treat an inner ear infection (also called otitis media).

Ofloxacin otic may be used on a long-term basis to treat an infection that causes a hole in the ear drum (ruptured ear drum) in adults and children who are at least 12 years old.

Ofloxacin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using ofloxacin otic?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to ofloxacin or similar antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), gatifloxacin (Tequin), levofloxacin (Levaquin), lomefloxacin (Maxaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), or norfloxacin (Noroxin).

FDA pregnancy category C. It is not known whether ofloxacin otic will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using this medicine.

It is not known whether this medicine passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

How should I use ofloxacin otic?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Shake the medicine well just before each use.

You may warm the medicine before use by holding the bottle in your hand for 1 or 2 minutes. Using cold ear drops can cause dizziness.

To use the ear drops:

  • Lie down or tilt your head with your ear facing upward. Open the ear canal by gently pulling your ear back, or pulling downward on the earlobe when giving this medicine to a child.
  • Hold the dropper upside down over your ear and drop the correct number of drops into the ear.
  • Stay lying down or with your head tilted for at least 5 minutes. You may use a small piece of cotton to plug the ear and keep the medicine from draining out.
  • If the patient being treated has ear tubes, the doctor may recommend gently pressing the tragus (part of the ear in front of the opening of the ear canal) four to five times in a pumping motion after administration of the drops. This may allow the drops to pass through the tubes into the middle ear. Follow the doctor's instructions.

Do not touch the dropper tip or place it directly in your ear. It may become contaminated. Wipe the tip with a clean tissue but do not wash with water or soap.

Use this medicine for the full prescribed length of time. Your symptoms may improve before the infection is completely cleared. Skipping doses may also increase your risk of further infection that is resistant to antibiotics.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if you have new symptoms.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Throw away any unused medicine after your treatment is finished.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of this medicine is not expected to be dangerous. Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if anyone has accidentally swallowed the medication.

What should I avoid while taking ofloxacin otic?

This medicine is for use only in the ears. Avoid getting the medicine in your eyes, mouth, and nose, or on your lips. Rinse with water if this medicine gets in or on these areas.

Do not use other ear medications unless your doctor tells you to.

What other drugs will affect ofloxacin otic?

It is not likely that other drugs you take orally or inject will have an effect on ofloxacin used in the ears. But many drugs can interact with each other. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all medicines you use, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about ofloxacin otic.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.01. Revision date: 6/6/2014.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Sours: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d04265a1

Antipyrine-Benzocaine Otic

pronounced as (an tee pye' reen) (ben' zoe kane)

Antipyrine and benzocaine otic is used to relieve ear pain and swelling caused by middle ear infections. It may be used along with antibiotics to treat an ear infection. It is also used to help remove a build up of ear wax in the ear. Antipyrine and benzocaine are in a class of medications called analgesics. The combination of antipyrine and benzocaine works by reducing pain and discomfort in the ear.

Antipyrine and benzocaine otic comes as a solution (liquid) to place into the ear. When antipyrine and benzocaine is used to relieve ear pain, it is usually used every 1 to 2 hours as needed. When antipyrine and benzocaine is used to help in the removal of ear wax, it is usually used 3 times daily for 2-3 days. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use antipyrine and benzocaine otic exactly as directed.

Antipyrine and benzocaine otic is for use only in the ears.

To use the eardrops, follow these steps:

  1. Hold the bottle in your hand for 1 or 2 minutes to warm the solution.
  2. Place the prescribed number of drops into your ear.
  3. Be careful not to touch the tip to your ear, fingers, or any other surface.
  4. Moisten a small piece of cotton with the drops and insert into the outer ear.
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 for the opposite ear if necessary.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Before using antipyrine and benzocaine otic,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to antipyrine or benzocaine or any other medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take.
  • tell your doctor if you have a hole in your ear drum(s) or ear tube(s). Your doctor will probably tell you not to use this medication.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using antipyrine and benzocaine otic, call your doctor.

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

This medication is usually used as needed. If your doctor has told you to use antipyrine and benzocaine otic regularly, use the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not use extra solution to make up for a missed one.

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Do not freeze. Antipyrine and benzocaine otic should be disposed of 6 months after the bottle is opened.

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

If someone swallows antipyrine and benzocaine otic, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

  • A/B Otic Drops (containing Antipyrine, Benzocaine)§
  • Auralgan® (containing Antipyrine, Benzocaine)§
  • Aurodex® (containing Antipyrine, Benzocaine)§
Last Revised - 02/15/2018

Browse Drugs and Medicines

Sours: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a607073.html
  1. A phrase definition
  2. 3x video movie
  3. 23 inch sink
  4. Rap beats free

Oral Antibiotics for Ear Infections

When you need them—and when you don’t

Antibiotics are strong medicines that can kill bacteria. For ear infections, doctors often prescribe oral antibiotics that you swallow in pill or liquid form.

However, eardrops can sometimes be safer and more effective than oral medicines. Here’s why:

Oral antibiotics have risks.

  • Oral antibiotics are more likely to cause resistant bacteria outside the ear. When that happens, these medicines will not work as well in the future. Illnesses will be harder to cure and more costly to treat.
  • Antibiotic eardrops kill the bacteria faster and more completely than oral antibiotics. Drops don’t go into the bloodstream, so more medicine reaches the infection.

Oral antibiotics have more side effects.

Oral antibiotics can cause more side effects than antibiotic eardrops. Side effects include diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, stomach pain, rash, headache, and dangerous allergic reactions.

Who should use antibiotic eardrops?

Antibiotic eardrops can be more effective and safer for:

  • People with Swimmer’s Ear, an infection caused by water in the ear.
  • Children who have tubes in their ears. The tubes prevent most infections behind the eardrum—an area known as the middle ear. If there is an infection, antibiotic eardrops can be given right through the tube.

What about over-the-counter eardrops?

Over-the-counter eardrops can often be effective for Swimmer’s Ear.

People who have a hole or tube in the eardrum should check with their doctor before using any kind of eardrops. The drops may cause pain, infection, or even damage hearing. For bacterial infections, the only eardrops they should use are the antibiotics ofloxacin (Floxin Otic and generic) or the more pricey combination drug ciprofloxacin-dexamethasone (Ciprodex).

Antibiotics can lead to more costs.

Most oral antibiotics don’t cost much. But if they don’t work well, you may need extra doctor visits, a hospital stay, and costly drugs. You may also miss work. Treatment of a severe infection that is antibiotic-resistant can cost more than $25,000.

Who should take oral antibiotics for ear infections?

  • Children without ear tubes should take oral antibiotics for middle-ear infections, especially when they have severe ear pain or high fever.
  • Children with ear tubes should take oral antibiotics if:
    • They are very ill.
    • They have another reason to be on an antibiotic.
    • The infection doesn’t go away with eardrops.

Oral antibiotics help treat Swimmer’s Ear when:

  • Infection spreads beyond the ear.
  • The person has other conditions, such as diabetes, that increase the risk of complications.

This report is for you to use when talking with your healthcare provider. It is not a substitute for medical advice and treatment. Use of this report is at your own risk.

© 2017 Consumer Reports. Developed in cooperation with the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head And Neck Surgery.

10/2013

Sours: https://www.choosingwisely.org/patient-resources/oral-antibiotics-for-ear-infections/
Antibiotic Ear Drops - When and How to Use Ear Drops Properly

Neomycin, Polymyxin, and Hydrocortisone Otic

pronounced as (nee" oh mye' sin)(pol" ee mix' in)(hye" droe kor' ti sone)

Neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination is used to treat outer ear infections caused by certain bacteria. It is also used to treat outer ear infections that can occur after certain types of ear surgery. Neomycin and polymyxin are in a class of medications called antibiotics. They work by stopping the growth of bacteria. Hydrocortisone is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by activating natural substances in the ear to reduce swelling, redness, and itching.

Neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with undissolved particles) to instill in the ear. It is usually used in the affected ear(s) three to four times a day for up to 10 days. Use neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination is only for use in the ears. Do not use in the eyes.

Your symptoms should begin to improve during the first few days of treatment with neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination. If your symptoms do not improve after one week or get worse, call your doctor.

To use the eardrops, follow these steps:

  1. Hold the bottle in your hand for 1 or 2 minutes to warm the solution.
  2. If you are using the suspension, shake the bottle well.
  3. Clean and dry the affected ear canal thoroughly with a sterile cotton applicator.
  4. Lie down with the affected ear upward.
  5. Place the prescribed number of drops into your ear.
  6. Be careful not to touch the dropper tip to your ear, fingers, or any other surface.
  7. Remain lying down with the affected ear upward for 5 minutes.
  8. Repeat steps 1-6 for the opposite ear if necessary.If you prefer, you may place a cotton wick into the ear canal, and then the cotton may be saturated with the ear drops. The wick should be replaced at least once every 24 hours.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Before using neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to neomycin (Neo-Fradin, Mycifradin, others); polymyxin; hydrocortisone (Anusol HC, Cortef, others); aminoglycoside antibiotics such as amikacin, gentamicin (Gentak, Genoptic), kanamycin, paromomycin, streptomycin, and tobramycin (Tobrex, Tobi); sulfites; any other medications; or any of the ingredients in neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone solution or suspension. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have a hole or tear in your ear drum or if you have an ear infection caused by a virus such as chickenpox or herpes. Your doctor will probably tell you not to use neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any medical condition.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. If you become pregnant while using neomycin, polymyxin, and hydrocortisone otic combination, call your doctor.

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not use extra ear drops to make up for a missed dose.

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

Do not let anyone else take your medication.It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

  • Cortisporin Otic Solution® (as a combination product containing Neomycin, Polymyxin, Hydrocortisone)
  • Casporyn HC Otic Suspension® (as a combination product containing Neomycin, Polymyxin, Hydrocortisone)
Last Revised - 06/15/2018

Browse Drugs and Medicines

Sours: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a618031.html

Infection for ear otic drops

.

Antibiotic Ear Drops - When and How to Use Ear Drops Properly

.

You will also be interested:

.



783 784 785 786 787