Nd legislature calendar

Nd legislature calendar DEFAULT

2021 Legislative Deadlines

2021 Legislative Calendar and Deadlines (pdf version)
2021 Legislative Calendar and Deadlines (ics version)

COMPILED BY THE OFFICE OF THE ASSEMBLY CHIEF CLERK
Revised 12-18-20

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Spring Recess28293031

March Deadlines

Mar. 25 Spring Recess begins upon adjournment (J.R. 51(a)(2)). (add to calendar)
Mar. 31 Cesar Chavez Day observed. (add to calendar)

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April Deadlines

Apr. 5 Legislature reconvenes from Spring Recess (J.R. 51(a)(2)). (add to calendar)
Apr. 30 Last day for policy committees to meet and report to fiscal committees fiscal bills introduced in their house (J.R. 61(a)(2)). (add to calendar)

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May Deadlines

May 7 Last day for policy committees to meet and report to the floor non-fiscal bills introduced in their house (J.R. 61(a)(3)). (add to calendar)
May 14 Last day for policy committees to meet prior to June 7 (J.R. 61(a)(4). (add to calendar)
May 21 Last day for fiscal committees to meet and report to the floor bills introduced in their house (J.R. 61(a)(5)). Last day for fiscal committees to meet prior to June 7 (J.R. 61(a)(6)). (add to calendar)
May 31 Memorial Day. (add to calendar)

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June Deadlines

June 1-4 Floor session only. No committee may meet for any purpose except Rules Committee, bills referred pursuant to A.R. 77.2, and Conference Committees (J.R. 61(a)(7)). (add to calendar)
June 4 Last day for each house to pass bills introduced in that house (J.R. 61(a)(8)).(add to calendar)
June 7 Committee meetings may resume (J.R. 61(a)(9)).. (add to calendar)
June 15 Budget Bill must be passed by midnight (Art. IV, Sec. 12(c)(3)). (add to calendar)

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Summer
Recess
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Summer
Recess
25262728293031

July Deadlines

July 2 Independence Day observed. (add to calendar)
July 14 Last day for policy committees to meet and reports bills (J.R. 61(a)(11)).(add to calendar)
July 16Summer Recess begins upon adjournment, provided Budget Bill has been passed (J.R. 51(a)(3)).(add to calendar)

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August Deadlines

Aug. 16 Legislature reconvenes from Summer Recess (J.R. 51(a)(3)). (add to calendar)
Aug. 27 Last day for fiscal committees to meet and report bills (J.R. 61(b)(12)). (add to calendar)
Aug. 30-Sept. 10Floor session only. No committee may meet for any purpose except Rules Committee, bills referred pursuant to A.R. 77.2, and Conference Committees (J.R. 61(a)(13)). (add to calendar)

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September Deadlines

Sept. 3 Last day to amend bills on the floor (J.R. 61(a)(14)). (add to calendar)
Sept. 6 Labor Day. (add to calendar)
Sept. 10 Last day for any bill to be passed (J.R. 61(a)(15)). Interim Recess begins upon adjournment (J.R. 51(a)(4)). (add to calendar)

IMPORTANT DATES OCCURRING DURING FINAL RECESS

2021
Oct. 10 Last day for Governor to sign or veto bills passed by the Legislature before Sept. 10 and in the Governor's possession on or after Sept. 10 (Art. IV, Sec. 10(b)(1)). (add to calendar)

2022
Jan. 1 Statutes take effect (Art. IV, Sec. 8(c)). (add to calendar)
Jan. 3 Legislature reconvenes (J.R. 51(a)(4)). (add to calendar)

* Holiday schedule subject to final approval by Rules Committee.

Sours: https://www.assembly.ca.gov/legislativedeadlines

Events Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sours: https://www.legis.nd.gov/events
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2020

2022

2021 North Dakota legislative session
Flag of North Dakota.png
General information
Session start:    January 5, 2021

Session end:    April 28, 2021

Leadership
Senate President
Brent Sanford (R)

House Speaker
Kim Koppelman (R)
Majority Leader
Senate: TBD
House: Chet Pollert (R)
Minority Leader
Senate: Joan Heckaman (D)
House: TBD

Elections
Next Election:    November 08, 2022

Last Election:    November 3, 2021

Previous legislative sessions
2020 • 2019 • 2018
Other 2021 legislative sessions


In 2021, the North Dakota Legislative Assembly was scheduled to convene on January 5 and adjourn on April 28.

The legislators serving in this session took office following the 2020 elections. Republicans won a 40-7 majority in the Senate and a 80-14 majority in the House. The party also controlled the governorship, creating a Republican state government trifecta. At the start of the 2021 session, North Dakota was one of 22 state legislatures where one party had a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers.

The North Dakota Legislative Assembly is responsible for redistricting following each census. Legislators were expected to address redistricting as part of the 2021 legislative session. As of the 2020 Census, North Dakota was one of 37 states where legislators were responsible for redistricting.

At the beginning of the 2021 legislative session:

  • Republicans held a majority in the North Dakota state House and state Senate.
  • North Dakota was one of 22 Republican state government trifectas.
  • North Dakota's governor was Republican Doug Burgum.
  • Leadership in 2021

    North Dakota State Senate

    • Senate president: Brent Sanford
    • Majority leader: TBD
    • Minority leader: Joan Heckaman

    North Dakota House of Representatives

    • Speaker of the House: Kim Koppelman
    • Majority leader: Chet Pollert
    • Minority leader: TBD

    Partisan control in 2021

    See also: State government trifectas

    North Dakota was one of 22 Republican state government trifectas at the start of 2021 legislative sessions. A state government trifecta occurs when one political party holds the governor's office, a majority in the state Senate, and a majority in the state House. For more information about state government trifectas, click here.

    North Dakota was also one of 22 state legislatures where one party had a veto-proof supermajority in both chambers. Veto overrides occur when a legislature votes to reverse a veto issued by an executive such as a governor or the president. If one party has a majority in a state legislature that is large enough to override a gubernatorial veto without any votes from members of the minority party, it is called a veto-proof majority or, sometimes, a supermajority. To read more about veto-proof supermajorities in state legislatures, click here.

    The following tables show the partisan breakdown of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly in the 2021 legislative session.

    North Dakota State Senate

    North Dakota House of Representatives

    Regular session

    The following widget shows up to 25 pieces of legislation in the 2021 legislative session that most recently passed both chambers of the legislature, were signed by the governor, or were approved by the legislature in a veto override. If no bills are displayed below, no legislation has met these criteria yet in 2021. This information is provided by BillTrack50.

    Redistricting

    See also: Redistricting in North Dakota after the 2020 census

    Redistricting is the process of enacting new congressional and state legislative district boundaries. Upon completion of the 2020 census, North Dakota will draft and enact new district maps.

    North Dakota's one United States representative and 141 state legislators are all elected from political divisions called districts. District lines are redrawn every 10 years following completion of the United States census. Federal law stipulates that districts must have nearly equal populations and must not discriminate on the basis of race or ethnicity.

    To learn more about the redistricting process in North Dakota after the 2020 census, click here.

    Standing legislative committees

    See also: Standing committee and List of committees in North Dakota state government


    A standing committee of a state legislature is a committee that exists on a more-or-less permanent basis, from legislative session to session, that considers and refines legislative bills that fall under the committee's subject matter.

    At the beginning of the 2021 legislative session, there were 22 standing committees in North Dakota's state government, including 11 state Senate committees and 11 state House committees.

    Senate committees

    • Agriculture Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Appropriations Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Education Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Energy and Natural Resources Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Finance and Taxation Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Government and Veterans Affairs Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Human Services Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Industry, Business and Labor Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Judiciary Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Political Subdivisions Committee, North Dakota State Senate
    • Transportation Committee, North Dakota State Senate

    House committees

    • Agriculture Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Appropriations Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Education Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Energy and Natural Resources Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Finance and Taxation Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Government and Veterans Affairs Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Human Services Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Industry, Business and Labor Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Judiciary Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Political Subdivisions Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives
    • Transportation Committee, North Dakota House of Representatives

    Legislatively referred constitutional amendments

    In every state but Delaware, voter approval is required to enact a constitutional amendment. In each state, the legislature has a process for referring constitutional amendments before voters. In 18 states, initiated constitutional amendments can be put on the ballot through a signature petition drive. There are also many other types of statewide measures.

    The methods in which the North Dakota Constitution can be amended:

    See also: Article III and Section 16, Article IV, of the North Dakota Constitution and Laws governing ballot measures in North Dakota

    There are three paths to amending the North Dakota Constitution: initiated constitutional amendments, legislatively referred constitutional amendments, and constitutional conventions.

    • It is unusual for a constitution to explicitly address this issue.
    • The North Dakota Constitution provides no mechanism under which the state legislature can initiate a call for a convention.
    • Section 16 says, "Any amendment to this constitution may be proposed in either house of the legislative assembly, and if agreed to upon a roll call by a majority of the members elected to each house, must be submitted to the electors and if a majority of the votes cast thereon are in the affirmative, the amendment is a part of this constitution."
    • Unlike any other state constitution, the North Dakota Constitution defines the process of the legislatively referred constitutional amendment in the article of the state constitution that, overall, has to do with the rights and prerogatives of the state's legislative branch. Nearly every other state constitution has a separate article of the constitution specifically dedicated to how the state's constitution can be amended.

    2021 measures:

    Below is a list of measures that were referred to the 2021 ballot by the legislature.

    See also: 2021 ballot measures

    Certified:

    The following measures were certified for the ballot.

    No measures to list

    Historical partisan control

    The table below depicts the historical trifecta status of North Dakota.

    North Dakota Party Control: 1992-2021
    No Democratic trifectas  •  Twenty-seven years of Republican trifectas
    Scroll left and right on the table below to view more years.

    Year 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
    GovernorDRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
    SenateDDDRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
    HouseRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

    Historical Senate control

    Between 1992 and 2020, partisan control of the North Dakota State Senate shifted in favor of the Republican Party. After the 1992 elections, Democrats held a 25-24 majority in the state Senate. Republicans would gain control of the chamber in 1994 elections and would continue to grow their majority to the point where, as a result of the 2020 elections, Republicans maintained a 40-7 majority. The table below shows the partisan history of the North Dakota State Senate following every general election from 1992 to 2020. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

    North Dakota State Senate Party Control: 1992-2020

    Year '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 '20
    Democrats2520191818161521211213159107
    Republicans242930313131322626353332383740

    There were three major changes to the partisan balance of the state Senate between 1992 and 2020. The first was in 1994, when Republicans gained five seats and took control of the chamber. In 2006, Democrats gained six seats, moving the balance to 26-21 in favor of Republicans. That balance would stand until 2010, when Republicans would gain nine seats and increase their majority to 35-12.

    Democrats then gained three seats between the two elections in 2012 and 2014. In 2016, Republicans gained six seats and increased their majority to 38-9 but lost one seat in 2018. They gained three seats in 2020, increasing their majority to 40-7.

    Historical House control

    Between 1992 and 2020, partisan control of the North Dakota House of Representatives shifted to further the advantage of the Republican Party. The 2010 redistricting process reduced the number of seats in the chamber from 98 to 94. As such, it can be helpful to compare partisan control in terms of percentages. In 1992, Republicans controlled 66 percent of the chamber. After the 2020 elections, Republicans held 80 seats, or 85 percent of the chamber. The table below shows the partisan history of the North Dakota House of Representatives following every general election from 1992 to 2020. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

    North Dakota House of Representatives Party Control: 1992-2020

    Year '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 '20
    Democrats332326342928263336252323131514
    Republicans657572646966686158697171817980

    The 10 seats gained by Republicans in the 2016 elections represented that party's most significant gains between 1992 and 2020. The shift favoring Democrats more than any other occurred as a result of the 1998 elections, when Democrats gained eight seats.

    Republican majorities in the state House have increased since 2008. The partisan balance of the chamber as a result of the 2008 elections was 58-36 in favor of Republicans. The Republican majority grew to 80-14 after the 2020 elections.

    See also

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    2022

    State legislative elections (2022) • State legislative special elections (2022) • Primary dates and filing requirements • 2022 Session Dates


    2021

    State legislative elections (2021) • State legislative special elections (2021) • Primary dates and filing requirements • 2021 Session Dates


    Historical elections

    2020 • 2019 • 2018 • 2017 • 2016 • 2015 • 2014 • 2013 • 2012 • 2011 • 2010 • 2009 • 2008 • 2007 • 2006 • 2005 • 2004 • 2003 • 2002 • 2001 • 2000


    Features of
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    How vacancies are filled in state legislatures • States with a full-time legislature • State legislatures with term limits • Comparison of state legislative salaries • When state legislators assume office after a general election • Population represented by state legislators • State constitutional articles governing state legislatures • State legislative sessions • Resign-to-run law • State legislature candidate requirements by state • Official names of state legislatures • State legislative chambers that use multi-member districts • Factors Affecting Competitiveness in State Legislative Elections


    State senates

    Length of terms of state senators • State senators • Partisan composition of state senates • State senators sorted by year first elected


    State houses

    Length of terms of state representatives • State representatives • Partisan composition of state houses • State representatives sorted by year first elected


    Leadership positions

    President of the Senate • President Pro Tempore • Senate Majority Leader • Senate Minority Leader • House Majority Leader • House Minority Leader • State Speaker of the House

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    Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/2021_North_Dakota_legislative_session
    COMELEC, inilatag ang calendar of activities para sa 2022 elections

    The North Dakota Legislative Assembly is the state legislature of North Dakota. The Legislative Assembly consists of two bodies, the North Dakota House of Representatives and the North Dakota State Senate. A legislative council and its research, administrative, and support staff also assist the Legislative Assembly in its day-to-day activities.

    The Legislative Assembly convenes within the state capitol building in Bismarck.

    Because the House and Senate sit for only 80 days in odd-numbered years, the legislative council oversees legislative affairs in the interim periods, doing longer-term studies of issues, and drafting legislation for consideration in both houses at the next session.

    North Dakota has a Republican state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. As of October 18, 2021, there are 23 Republican trifectas, 15 Democratic trifectas, and 12 divided governments where neither party holds trifecta control.

    In the 2020 election, Republicans had a net gain of two trifectas and two states under divided government became trifectas. Prior to that election, North Dakota had a Republican trifecta. There were 21 Republican trifectas, 15 Democratic trifectas, and 14 divided governments.

    See also: North Dakota House of Representatives, North Dakota State Senate, North Dakota Governor

    Elections

    2022

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2022 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2022

    Elections for the North Dakota State Senate will take place in 2022. The general election is on November 8, 2022. A primary is scheduled for June 14, 2022. The filing deadline is April 11, 2022.

    Elections for the North Dakota House of Representatives will take place in 2022. The general election is on November 8, 2022. A primary is scheduled for June 14, 2022. The filing deadline is April 11, 2022.

    2020

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2020 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2020

    Elections for the office of North Dakota State Senate took place in 2020. The general election was held on November 3, 2020. A primary was scheduled for June 9, 2020. The filing deadline was April 6, 2020.

    Elections for the office of North Dakota House of Representatives took place in 2020. The general election was held on November 3, 2020. A primary was scheduled for June 9, 2020. The filing deadline was April 6, 2020.

    2018

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2018 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2018

    Elections for the North Dakota State Senate took place in 2018. An open primary election took place on June 12, 2018. The general election was held on November 6, 2018. The candidate filing deadline was April 9, 2018Last day to file petitions or nominations .[1]

    Elections for the North Dakota House of Representatives took place in 2018. An open primary election took place on June 12, 2018. The general election was held on November 6, 2018. The candidate filing deadline was April 9, 2018Last day to file petitions or nominations .[2]

    2016

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2016 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2016

    Elections for the North Dakota State Senate took place in 2016. The primary election took place on June 14, 2016, and the general election was held on November 8, 2016. The candidate filing deadline was April 11, 2016.

    Elections for the North Dakota House of Representatives took place in 2016. The primary election took place on June 14, 2016, and the general election was held on November 8, 2016. The candidate filing deadline was April 11, 2016.

    2014

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2014 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2014

    Elections for the North Dakota State Senate took place in 2014. A primary election took place on June 10, 2014. The general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was April 7, 2014.

    Elections for the North Dakota House of Representatives took place in 2014. A primary election took place on June 10, 2014. The general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was April 7, 2014.

    2012

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2012 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2012

    Elections for the office of North Dakota State Senate took place in 2012. The primary election was held on June 12, 2012, and the general election was held on November 6, 2012. The candidate filing deadline was April 13, 2012.

    Elections for the office of North Dakota House of Representatives took place in 2012. The primary election was held on June 12, 2012, and the general election was held on November 6, 2012. The candidate filing deadline was April 13, 2012.

    2010

    See also: North Dakota State Senate elections, 2010 and North Dakota House of Representatives elections, 2010

    Elections for the office of North Dakota State Senate took place in 2010. The primary election was held on June 8, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. The candidate filing deadline was March 8, 2010.

    Elections for the office of North Dakota House of Representatives took place in 2010. The primary election was held on June 8, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. The candidate filing deadline was March 8, 2010.

    Sessions

    Article IV of the North Dakota Constitution establishes when the Assembly is to be in session. Section 7 of Article IV states that the Assembly is to convene in regular session every January after a legislative election. This means that the Assembly convenes in January of every odd-numbered year. Section 7 specifies that the convening date is to be the first Tuesday after the third day in January, unless this date is changed by law. Section 7 limits the length of regular sessions to no more than eighty days every two years.

    2021

    See also: 2021 North Dakota legislative session and Dates of 2021 state legislative sessions

    In 2021, the legislature was scheduled to convene on January 5, 2021, and adjourn on April 29, 2021.

    2020

    See also: Dates of 2020 state legislative sessions

    In 2020, the legislature did not hold a regular session.

    2019

    See also: 2019 North Dakota legislative session and Dates of 2019 state legislative sessions

    In 2019, the legislature was in session from January 3, 2019, through April 26, 2019.

    2018

    See also: Dates of 2018 state legislative sessions

    In 2018, the legislature did not hold a regular session.

    Click [show] for past years' session dates.

    2017

    See also: Dates of 2017 state legislative sessions

    In 2017, the legislature was in session from January 3, 2017, through April 27, 2017.

    2016

    See also: Dates of 2016 state legislative sessions

    In 2016, the Legislature did not hold a regular session.

    2015

    See also: Dates of 2015 state legislative sessions

    In 2015, the legislature was in session from January 6 through April 29.

    Major issues in 2015

    Major issues in the 2015 legislative session included funding for oil country, Common Core education standards, income taxes, and higher education funding.[3]

    2014

    See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

    In 2014, the legislature did not hold a regular session.

    2013

    See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

    In 2013, the legislature was in session from January 8 to May 4.

    Major issues in 2013

    Major issues in the 2013 legislative session were focused mostly on the oil boom in western North Dakota and included a budget, the state surplus, improved transportation infrastructure, and decreasing crime.[4]

    2012

    See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

    In 2012, the legislature did not hold a regular session.

    2011

    See also: Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions

    In 2011, the legislature was in regular session from January 4 through April 28.[5] A special session was called by GovernorJack Dalrymple (R) from November 7 through 12 to cover legislative redistricting and disaster relief.[6]

    Interim Committees

    On May 25, 2011 the Legislative Management Committee appointed members to the state's interim committees. Historically, majority and minority members of the Legislative Management Committee are appointed as chairs of the interim committees. However in 2011, only Republican legislators were appointed to chair interim committees. House Minority Leader Jerome Kelsh (D) called the move partisan and a "break with tradition." House Majority Leader Al Carlson (R) argued that the appointments reflected wishes of voters in electing Republican candidates. Regardless of the particular committee chair, Republicans had a majority on all committees. Only a few states permit minority committee chairs.[7]

    2010

    See also: Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions

    In 2010, the legislature did not meet in regular session.[8]

    Role in state budget

    See also: North Dakota state budget and finances

    The state operates on a biennial budget cycle. The sequence of key events in the budget process is as follows:[9]

    1. Budget instructions are sent to state agencies between April and May of the year preceding the start of the new biennium.
    2. State agencies submit their budget requests to the governor between July and October.
    3. Agency hearings are held between July and October.
    4. The governor submits his or her proposed budget to the state legislature in December.
    5. The legislature typically adopts a budget in April. A simple majority is required to pass a budget. The new biennium begins in July.


    North Dakota is one of 44 states in which the governor has line item veto authority.[9]

    The governor is constitutionally required to submit a balanced budget proposal. Likewise, the state legislature is required to pass a balanced budget.[9]

    Legislators

    Salaries

    See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries
    State legislators
    SalaryPer diem
    $526/month$189/day

    When sworn in

    See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

    North Dakota legislators assume office December 1st.[10]

    Senate

    The North Dakota State Senate is the upper house of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly.

    North Dakota is divided into between 40 and 54 legislative districts apportioned by population as determined by the decennial census. The 2000 redistricting plan provided for 47 districts. Each member represented an average of 14,310 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[11] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 13,664.[12]

    Party As of October 2021
        Democratic Party 7
        Republican Party 40
         Vacancies 0
    Total 47

    Click here for a list of members of this chamber.

    Between 1992 and 2020, partisan control of the North Dakota State Senate shifted in favor of the Republican Party. After the 1992 elections, Democrats held a 25-24 majority in the state Senate. Republicans would gain control of the chamber in 1994 elections and would continue to grow their majority to the point where, as a result of the 2020 elections, Republicans maintained a 40-7 majority. The table below shows the partisan history of the North Dakota State Senate following every general election from 1992 to 2020. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

    North Dakota State Senate Party Control: 1992-2020

    Year '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 '20
    Democrats2520191818161521211213159107
    Republicans242930313131322626353332383740

    There were three major changes to the partisan balance of the state Senate between 1992 and 2020. The first was in 1994, when Republicans gained five seats and took control of the chamber. In 2006, Democrats gained six seats, moving the balance to 26-21 in favor of Republicans. That balance would stand until 2010, when Republicans would gain nine seats and increase their majority to 35-12.

    Democrats then gained three seats between the two elections in 2012 and 2014. In 2016, Republicans gained six seats and increased their majority to 38-9 but lost one seat in 2018. They gained three seats in 2020, increasing their majority to 40-7.

    House of Representatives

    The North Dakota House of Representatives is the lower house of the North Dakota Legislative Assembly. Each of North Dakota's 47 districts elects two representatives to the House, for a total of 94 representatives. Each member represented an average of 7,155 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[11] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 6,832.[12]

    Party As of October 2021
        Democratic Party 14
        Republican Party 80
         Vacancies 0
    Total 94

    Click here for a list of members of this chamber.

    Between 1992 and 2020, partisan control of the North Dakota House of Representatives shifted to further the advantage of the Republican Party. The 2010 redistricting process reduced the number of seats in the chamber from 98 to 94. As such, it can be helpful to compare partisan control in terms of percentages. In 1992, Republicans controlled 66 percent of the chamber. After the 2020 elections, Republicans held 80 seats, or 85 percent of the chamber. The table below shows the partisan history of the North Dakota House of Representatives following every general election from 1992 to 2020. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

    North Dakota House of Representatives Party Control: 1992-2020

    Year '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 '20
    Democrats332326342928263336252323131514
    Republicans657572646966686158697171817980

    The 10 seats gained by Republicans in the 2016 elections represented that party's most significant gains between 1992 and 2020. The shift favoring Democrats more than any other occurred as a result of the 1998 elections, when Democrats gained eight seats.

    Republican majorities in the state House have increased since 2008. The partisan balance of the chamber as a result of the 2008 elections was 58-36 in favor of Republicans. The Republican majority grew to 80-14 after the 2020 elections.

    Veto overrides

    Veto Override Graphic-Republican Party.png

    See also: Veto overrides in state legislatures

    State legislatures can override governors' vetoes. Depending on the state, this can be done during the regular legislative session, in a special session following the adjournment of the regular session, or during the next legislative session. The rules for legislative overrides of gubernatorial vetoes in North Dakota are listed below.

    How many legislators are required to vote for an override? Two-thirds of members in both chambers.

    Two-thirds of members in both chambers must vote to override a veto, which is 63 of the 94 members in the North Dakota House of Representatives and 32 of the 47 members in the North Dakota State Senate. North Dakota is one of 36 states that requires a two-thirds vote from both of its legislative chambers to override a veto.

    Authority:Article V, Section 9 of the North Dakota Constitution.

    "The governor shall return for reconsideration any vetoed item or bill, with a written statement of the governor's objections, to the house in which it originated. That house shall immediately enter the governor's objections upon its journal. If, by a recorded vote, two-thirds of the members elected to that house pass a vetoed item or bill, it, along with the statement of the governor's objections, must immediately be delivered to the other house. If, by a recorded vote, two-thirds of the members elected to the other house also pass it, the vetoed item or bill becomes law."

    District maps

    State Senate

    Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/North_Dakota_Legislative_Assembly

    Legislature calendar nd

    North Dakota Legislature | 2021-2022 | 67th Legislative Assembly | In Recess

    2046A BILL for an Act to create and enact sections 54-52-02.15, 54-52-02.16, and 54-52.6-02.1 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to the public employees retirement system main system and membership in the public employees retirement system define...2021-04-29

    Second reading, failed to pass, yeas 12 nays 35

    2290AN ACT to amend and reenact sections 54-16-04.1 and 54-16-04.2 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to emergency commission and budget section approval to accept and disburse federal and other funds; and to declare an emergency.2021-04-28

    Passed over veto, yeas 75 nays 11

    1323AN ACT to create and enact a new section to chapter 23-07 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to limitations on mask wearing requirements.2021-04-27

    Filed with Secretary Of State 04/27

    2139A BILL for an Act to create and enact a new section to chapter 54-27.2 and a new section to chapter 57-01 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to an income tax rate reduction fund and an income tax rate adjustment; and to provide for a transfer...2021-04-27

    Second reading, failed to pass, yeas 6 nays 41

    1298AN ACT to create and enact a new section to chapter 14-02.4 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to participation in athletic events exclusively for males or females; and to provide for a legislative management study.2021-04-27

    Filed with Secretary Of State 04/27

    1279A BILL for an Act to amend and reenact section 39-06.1-06 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to the amount of statutory fees; to provide for a legislative management study; and to provide a penalty.2021-04-22

    Second reading, failed to pass, yeas 38 nays 55

    1378AN ACT to amend and reenact subsection 1 of section 54-03-02 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to authority for the legislative assembly to conduct business in December of even-numbered years.2021-04-22

    Veto sustained, yeas 32 nays 61

    2124A BILL for an Act to create and enact a new section to chapter 23-12, two new subsections to section 37-17.1-05, a new section to chapter 50-11, and a new section to chapter 54-03 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to prohibitions on vaccine ...2021-04-21

    Second reading, failed to pass, yeas 10 nays 36

    1282A BILL for an Act to create and enact a new section to chapter 54-35 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to a joint committee on federal nullification; and to provide a directive.2021-04-19

    Second reading, failed to pass, yeas 38 nays 55

    1371A BILL for an Act to create and enact a new section to chapter 1-08 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to requiring the state to observe daylight saving time year round; to repeal section 40-01-20 of the North Dakota Century Code, relating to...2021-04-19

    Second reading, failed to pass, yeas 36 nays 56

    Sours: https://legiscan.com/ND
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