Titleist 917 d3 driver settings

Titleist 917 d3 driver settings DEFAULT

SUREFIT® PERFORMANCE GUIDE

COMPLETE ADJUSTABILITY

Developed to fine-tune Titleist metals on tour, SureFit Hosel and SureFit CG provide our expert fitters with an industry-leading capability to optimally fit every golfer.

The SureFit® Hosel features a sleeve and ring, each with four settings. The sleeve settings are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and the ring settings are lettered A, B, C, D. There are 16 unique loft and lie angle combinations.

Adjusting the SureFit Hosel

Insert SureFit wrench into hosel screw and rotate counter-clockwise until hosel becomes loose, move adjustment ring to the desired setting, and tighten clockwise until you feel and hear the wrench “click”. If the screw feels like it is binding, stop and realign components.

Important Notes

  • TSi, TS, 917, 915, 913 and 910 driver shafts are interchangeable.
  • TSi, TS, 917, 915 and 913 fairway shafts are interchangeable.
  • Titleist Driver & Fairway SureFit Hosels adjust in .75° loft and lie increments.
  • Titleist Hybrid SureFit Hosels adjust in 1° loft and lie increments.

How to Adjust SureFit Hosel in TSi Metals

The SureFit Hosel features a sleeve and ring, each with four settings. The sleeve settings are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, and the ring settings are lettered A, B, C, D. There are 16 unique loft and lie angle combinations.

Performance Fitting Guides

Start in the standard position: A•1 (RH) or D•4 (LH).

Move up or down in the grid to adjust trajectory.

Move left or right in the grid to fine-tune direction.

+/- .75° denotes driver/fairway settings; +/- 1° denotes hybrid setting.

For best results, see an authorized Titleist Fitter.


*LOFT = EFFECTIVE LOFT with a square face at impact.

Experience Titleist Golf Clubs

The best way to truly appreciate the complete performance of Titleist golf clubs, achieve total confidence on every shot, and shoot lower scores, is to experience Titleist club fitting for yourself. Find a fitting location by using the search tool below or calling 1-888-TITLEIST.

Explore Titleist Club Fitting & Trial

SUREFIT WEIGHT TO SWINGWEIGHT CLOSEST TO STANDARD

SureFit Weight Options

Titleist Metals feature the ability to change the SureFit® weight in order to modify swingweight. Our fitting research shows that headweight has a significant influence on feel and that golfer preference was widely spread among all weights. The following table helps guide you to which SureFit weight may be used to achieve a swingweight close to our nominal swingweight.

CLUB LENGTH
MEN'SLADIES
1 1/2" Under+6g+2g
1" Under+4gStd.
1/2" Under+2g-2g
StandardStd.-4g
1/2" Over-2g-4g
1" Over-4g-4g

TSi3 metals feature a new SureFit® CG track technology, offering five unique positions in the Driver and three unique positions in the Fairway to adjust club head CG to fine-tune ball flight with neutral, fade or draw flight.

How to Adjust SureFit CG in the TSi3 Driver

Titleist TSi3 metals feature a new SureFit® CG track technology, offering five unique positions in the Driver and three unique positions in the Fairway to adjust club head CG to fine-tune ball flight with neutral, fade or draw flight.

WARNING

Read instructions completely before use.

The SureFit® wrench must be used to properly and safely adjust the performance of Titleist metals. Club components should be inspected frequently, before and during play, to ensure that all connections are tight. Keep the hosel connection area clean from dirt and debris at all times. This proprietary system is only compatible with genuine Titleist components and must NOT be used with components from other manufacturers. Failure to adhere to this provision may void the warranty and/or cause damage to the system. Failure to follow these instructions may create a situation where the clubhead could loosen or disengage from the shaft during a swing, possibly causing serious injury.

For more information, explore this website or U.S. consumers may also call Team Titleist at 1-888-TITLEIST. Titleist golf clubs conform to the Rules of Golf approved by the USGA and R&A. However, the settings on your golf club must not be adjusted during a round of golf. For complete rules information visit, www.usga.org or www.randa.org.

Sours: https://www.titleist.com/fitting/golf-club-fitting/surefit

…and how knowing exactly how it works can help your game

I have encountered many questions from consumers and golf industry employees as to what exactly happens when you change the setting on the Titleist SureFit Tour Hosel. Understanding how to use the Performance Fitting Chart and it’s 16 settings is vital to achieving the best launch conditions and getting the most out of your Titleist Driver, fairway metal, or hybrid.

For this example, lets use the 915 Performance Fitting Chart and a right-handed 9.5* Driver. In the A1 setting, the loft is the stated 9.5* with standard lie angle. If we are trying to achieve maximum height and launch with this current head/shaft combination, the appropriate setting would be A4. This setting mechanically adds 1.5* of loft, bringing us up to 11*. The important thing to keep in mind is that this loft change only takes place if you hold your Titleist Driver in the air and do not sole it. The reason for this is that when you add loft, you are effectively closing the face angle if you SOLE THE DRIVER ON THE GROUND. So, going from the A1 to A4 setting can lead to one of two scenarios. One, if the golfer never soles the club, squares the face, and he now has an 11* driver. Scenario two is that the golfer soles the club on the ground, takes his grip, and the driver is still 9.5* but the face angle is closed, adding a draw bias to the golf club. If you are a player that has to sole the club before you take your grip (most golfers are in my opinion) you are still in luck if you are trying to achieve 11*. Simply sole the club, open the clubface until it looks square or “normal” to you, take your grip and swing away. Some confusion arises around this topic because Titleist actually has two Charts. One is for consumers and this is what you will find with your literature when you purchase a Titleist Driver. The other chart, which has more information regarding face angle, is found in fitting guides that Titleist produces for PGA Professionals and golf club fitters. Below is the chart as you are probably used to seeing it…

The-Truth-about-the-Titleist-SureFit-Tour-Hosel-the-Performance-Fitting-Chart-1

As you can see there is no information regarding face angle. In my opinion this is acceptable as the extra information can tend to confuse some people. The most important thing to keep in mind is that when using this chart, if you are trying to achieve more or less loft, make sure you either square the face while the club is in the air, or you must first sole the club, open or close the club until it is square, and then take your grip. DO NOT sole the club and then immediately take your grip. If you do this you are simply playing with a different face angle, and did not change loft at all.

Now the other chart for club fitters looks like this….

915 Performance Fitting Guide (RH)

You can see there is an entirely new chart on the right side that shows what the face angle adjustments are when you go up or down in the chart. For all Titleist metals, from the 910 series to the 816 hybrids, the A1 setting has the standard loft stated on the club and the face angle is .5* open. When going from A1 to D4, you can see the face angle goes from .5* open to .5* closed, one whole degree of face closure, and we will achieve an increase of loft of .75* when the face is squared. The reason behind this is that loft to face angle is about a .7/1 ratio… meaning for every 1* change in face angle, the effective loft when the clubface is squared is altered by about .7*. To make things easier Titleist rounds up to a more round number of .75*. If we continue to go up the chart to the A4 setting, you see we close the face one more degree, and add another .75* of loft when the face is squared.

How this information can help you play better golf:

Understanding how face angle plays a role in the SureFit Tour Hosel can really help golfers if they are having directional issues with their driver or metals. For example…

If you are hitting a Slice:

Your setting would 100% be A3. In this scenario, it is vital that you simply sole the club, and then take your grip. DO NOT SQUARE THE FACE because then you are taking your closed face angle and draw biased club out of the equation. In the A3 setting the face angle is 1.5* closed and the lie angle is 1.5* upright, which will furthermore help to effectively close the face at impact and eliminate your slice.

If you are hitting a Hook:

Your setting would be C1. Simply ground the club and take your normal grip and in play you will have a driver that sits 1.5* open with a .75* flat lie angle. Both of these specs will aid in keeping the face open during impact and help to avoid the left side of the golf course.

If you like the look of an open club face but want a draw bias:

Your setting would be A2. Here we do not change face angle at all, we are simply making the club more upright. Face angle is still .5* open (which is a very popular position for golfers of all abilities) but the lie angle will be 1.5* upright to aid in achieving your draw. This brings up the point that loft and lie can be changed independently with this system. As you know loft and face angle have a relationship when going up or down in the chart, but simply moving left or right in the chart ONLY changes lie angle, and keeps loft/face angle static.

Notes on face angle according to Titleist.com

-Golfers will react differently to changes in face angle.

-Some will square the face at impact and alter the loft.

-The head will have more loft when squared at impact if you start with a closed face angle.

-The head will have less loft when squared at impact if you start with an open face angle.

-Some will maintain the club’s static face angle and the resulting change in face angle will affect direction.

-A closed face angle will result in left ball flight.

-An open face angle will result in right ball flight.

-Some golfers will make a combination of these adjustments.

-The golfer’s ability to consistently return the club face at impact has a greater effect on directional control than the face angle setting.

-Ultimately, the golfer’s ball flight will be your best source of guidance regarding performance.

Source: http://titleist.com

Important points to keep in mind:

  • For driver…each .75* change in loft changes launch by ½” and spin by 275 rpm
  • For driver… each .75* change in lie angle will affect direction by 2 yards
  • 915, 913, 910 driver heads and shafts are interchangeable
  • 915 and 913 fairway heads and shafts are interchangeable
  • 915 and 913 hybrid heads and shafts are interchangeable
  • 910 fairway heads and shafts are NOT interchangeable with 915 and 913
  • 910 hybrid heads and shafts are NOT interchangeable with 915 and 913
  • 816 hosel adjusts in 1.0* loft & lie increments if used in 915 and 913 heads
  • 915 and 913 hosel adjusts in .75* increments if used in 816 heads
816 Performance Fitting Guide (RH)

Conclusion:

As you can see this post has a ton of detailed information. My intent was to give you all the necessary tools to help you find the SureFit setting that helps you get the most out of your Titleist equipment. If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to ask or comment below. Good luck!

Also, please comment below and tell me what clubs/ shafts/ balls you would like to be tested head to head.I will choose the most popular requests and post results ASAP.


Comments:

Matthew,
Fantastic piece.
The most complete, thorough and easy to read description regarding effect of face angle and lie.
I’ve been trying to find out whether my driver would remain at .5 degrees open if I only changed lie angle. This article clearly states that it will per the club fitters guide.
Time for me to determine if a different lie angle will better suit my game.
I will be saving this piece to my favorites list.
Thank you for your help.
All the best,
Ronan ConnollyRonan Connolly
Hi Ronan,
Thank you for the great feedback and you are correct…With Titleist you absolutely do not change face angle/ loft when you more left or right ONLY on the SureFit Chart. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

Also, I apologize for not having a Newsletter sign-up… new to the whole blog thing and still learning.

Thanks for following,

DanKDanK

this is a great articleMark King
Thanks Mark for the feedback! If you have any other topics or questions you are interested in please let me know and I will try to help.DanK
Thanks for a very good explanation on Surefit. However, I need to ask about your recommendation if one is hitting a hook. It’s seems that for correcting a slice a higher loft is suggested (A3), which makes me think that a higher loft would also be good for correcting a hook. Still you recommend a lower loft. Why is that?

Cheers

NicolaiNicolai

Hello Nicolia,

Thank you for reading and for the question, I am happy to assist. If you are hitting a hook there are two things you can do to help you out. First I would recommend the B1 setting. Assuming you are in the neutral A1 setting currently, B1 will place the club .75* flat and provide more of a fade bias, which should help counteract your hook. The best thing with B1 is that you are not affecting loft or face angle. If B1 doesn’t offer enough assistance, go down to C1. The club will still be .75* flat, but now it will also be 1.5* open (face angle). The reason you should play C1, which is a lower lofted setting, is that in order to get the .75* less in loft that C1 provides, the club has to be opened by a full degree. In order to achieve your new “anti hook” setting, be sure to sole the club first, then take your grip and swing away. The club should seem flat and way open in regards to face angle. I hope this helps and please don’t hesitate if you have any further questions.

Take Care,

DanKDanK

Hi
would it follow that a short (5 6″)person will benefit from a flatter lie with the face squared ?
ThankyouGraham
Hello,

The general rule of thumb is that shorter players could benefit from a flatter lie angle… but not always. Assuming we are discussing the driver, how is your ball flight with a std. lie angle? If the ball is going left predominantly, try B1. If the ball is going right, try going left on the SureFit Chart to a more upright lie angle such as A2 or B2. Good luck.

-DanKDanK

Hi Matthew,
The first useable article I have found on the net, great work!

Im 44 years old, right handed a Hcp 15,2 golfer (been in Hcp 14,1 a couple of months ago)
I play with a “Diamana shaft D+70 x5ct Flex-S” with head 915D2 10.5 Degree..

When I bought my driver last year I got my driver fitted, and at first the PGA pro put it into B2, as I had (what most amateur golfers have, outside/in swing path) and having problem with either a slice or a fade…
I got instructed in swinging Inside/out, returned 14 days later, he looked at my swing, and changede it to A1 (neutral) as I was standing there it all seemed to work, he left and that was it… But since, I tend to either slice the ball, OR starting med ballflight from Left to right, and the real trouble begins in windy conditions (wind from the left) because its like adding a lot of side spin to my ballflight, and it then instead turns into a slice.

At the moment I have it in C3, (just to try something diffrent) but it´s like that´s to much loft for me, because I seem to sky it a bit, and it have a really high launch angle and I have lost like 20-30 yards or so, but with the same ballflight, (slice or Left to right)

But of course I do sometimes hit it dead straight, also in windy conditions, but my question is, can i neutralize this a bit by putting it in to C2 or D1.
Sole the club, open/ close the clubface until it looks square, take my grib and then swing away?

hope I write so you can understand it, as Im from Denmark

Best Regards
John/ KeezJohn Keez Madisa

Hi John,

Thanks for the question and positive feedback.

If your goal is maximum slice (lets call it a power fade) prevention, try A3. Make sure to sole the club (it should look closed), and then take your grip. The face angle will be 1.5* closed and 1.5* upright… all things to combat the dreaded left to right shot. Let me know how this works. Good luck!

-DanKDanK

Introducing the New Titleist 917 drivers, Tour Pros are Believers – USGolfTV – September 15, 2016 – 12:39 pm
[…] to chance in creating the perfect driver for Tour pros and average Joes. Their industry leading SureFit Hosel and SureFit CG weight system guarantee the best, most precise fitting for every […]
Mate this article is spot on.

Went to the range today and tried a few different settings. I held the 915d2 driver in the air, tried to get the club face as square as I could, took my grip, addressed the ball without soling the club and took my swing. For the first time since I bought the club, which was ages ago, I could actually see the benefits of changing the settings.

My fave was A4, got the ball really high with a slight draw for me.Tommy

Awesome! I love to hear success stories. Any other topics you might want some insight on? I’m happy to help.

-DanKDanK

It’s an amazing piece of writing designed for all the online users;
they will obtain advantage from it I am sure.(Your comment is awaiting moderation)Bandar Judi Bola
Sours: https://www.dankgolf.com/titleist-surefit-tour-hosel-performance-fitting-chart/
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Is the Titleist 917 driver adjustable?

Yes, the Titleist 917 driver is adjustable. Golfers can move the center of gravity of the driver either forward or backward depending on the extent of use.

You can also change the loft and lie angle of the driver. You will need to decide on the correct amount of weight to get a balanced neutral version.

 

Is the Titleist 917 driver good?

Yes, the Titleist 917 driver is good. It has a 440cc head that has a classic look. The driver offers great workability because of the ability to render fades, draws, high shots and low shots.

The two types of Titleist 917 drivers, D2 and D3 have their unique advantages like high spin, small head size adjustable center of gravity and so on.

 

Titleist 917 driver specs

Loft (in degrees)

8.5

9.5

10.5

12

Right Hand/Left Hand

Right Hand/Left Hand

Right Hand/Left Hand

Right Hand/Left Hand

Right Hand/Left Hand

Volume (in CC)

460

460

460

460

Length

45.00”

45.00”

45.00”

45.00”

Lie (in degrees)

58.5

58.5

58.5

58.5

 

How do I adjust my Titleist 917 driver?

You can adjust your Titleist 917 driver by removing the head and setting the desired letter-number combination. To do this, follow the steps given below.

  1. Loosen the screw in the clubhead using the given wrench.
  2. Remove the head of the driver.
  3. Align the desired letter and the number on the cogs in the desired manner with the dots on the hosel.
  4. Replace the head of the driver.
  5. Tighten the screw of the head. When the wrench clicks once, you are done with adjusting the Titleist 917 driver.

Players have experienced an overall higher launch but reduced distance with an increased loft. A decreased loft lowers the launch but increases the distance.

 

Titleist 917 driver adjustment chart

Right-handed Titleist 917 driver

Ring Combination

Loft (for 8.5° Driver)

Lie (Standard at 58.5°)

Position

A1

(Standard) 8.5°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

A2

(Standard) 8.5°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

A3 (Most Draw)

(+1.5) 10°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

A4

(+1.5) 10°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

B1

(Standard) 8.5°

(-0.75°) 57.75°

Flat

B2

(Standard) 8.5°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

B3

(+1.5°) 10°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

B4

(+1.5°) 10°

(-0.75°) 57.75°

Flat

C1 (Most Fade)

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(-0.75°) 57.75°

Flat

C2

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

C3

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

C4

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(-0.75°) 57.75°

Flat

D1

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

D2

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

D3

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

D4

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

 

Left-handed Titleist 917 driver

Ring Combination

Loft (for 8.5° Driver)

Lie (Standard at 58.5°)

Position

A1

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

A2

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

A3

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

A4

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

B1

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(-0.75°)57.75°

Flat

B2

(+0.75°) 9.25°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

B3

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

B4 (Most Fade)

(-0.75°) 7.75°

(-0.75°)57.75°

Flat

C1

(+1.5°) 10°

(-0.75°)57.75°

Flat

C2

(+1.5°) 10°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

C3

(Standard) 8.5°

(+0.75°) 59.25°

Upright

C4

(Standard) 8.5°

(-0.75°)57.75°

Flat

D1

(+1.5°) 10°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

D2 (Most Draw)

(+1.5°) 10°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

D3

(Standard) 8.5°

(+1.5°) 60°

Upright

D4

(Standard) 8.5°

(Standard) 58.5°

Neutral

 

Titleist 917 driver weight adjustment settings

When you move the weight to different positions like forward, backward, towards the perimeter and so on, you will experience varying abilities of the driver. Follow the steps given below to adjust the weight in Titleist 917 driver according to your desired results.

 

Shifting the weight towards the toe or heel

When you shift the weight towards the heel or toe, the ball tends to be inclined to the left or the right. f you move the weight in the side of the toe, your driver will tend to produce a fade or slice whereas moving the weight towards the heel will make the driver likely to draw to hook.

 

Moving the weight towards the heel or toe by a significant amount will also shift the position of the sweet spot. If you are consistently hitting the heel or toe of the driver, make sure to adjust the weight so that the sweet spot lies at its normal contact point.

 

Shifting the weight back or forth

When you move the weight backward, it makes the ball rise high with low spin. On the other hand, when you move the weight forward, the ball launches lower with a higher spin. You can feel the gear effect if you move the weight further backward.

 

Shifting weight towards the perimeter

Moving the weight towards the perimeter increases the moment of inertia and the driver becomes a little more forgiving. When the weight is centered, the moment of inertia decreases and the driver becomes less forgiving. Moment of inertia is nothing but an analogy of mass in rotational motion.

 

Moving the weight upwards or downwards

Moving the weight upwards corresponds to a low launch and high spin of the club.

When you move the weight downwards on the Titleist 917 driver, the club launches higher and spins at a lower rate. 

Moving the weight downwards is especially helpful when you move the weight towards the heel or toe and wish to hit the ball on the lower side of the clubface.

 

Titleist 917 Driver Adjustment

 

How to adjust a Titleist 917 D2 driver

Titleist 917 D2 driver is one of the two types of Titleist 917 drivers. This Titleist 917 driver is quite forgiving and is high launching. It has a higher moment of inertia as compared to the D3 model. To adjust a Titleist 917 D2 driver, follow the steps given below.

  1. Use the SureFit wrench to loosen the screw on the clubhead of the driver.
  2. Take out the head of the driver and set the preferred letter and number combination in line with the hosel dot markings.
  3. Put the head of the driver back in its position and tighten the screw of the head. Once the tightening tool clicks, it indicates that the Titleist 917 D2 driver has been adjusted.

Incrementing the loft allows golfers to play a draw whereas decrementing it sets the driver in favor of a fade. Increasing the lie angle to make it upright paves way for a hook.

 

How to adjust a Titleist 917 D3 driver

Titleist 917 D3 driver produces a bit less spin and offers more workability. The center of gravity of this driver is situated a little forward and the driver has a smaller head than the D2. If you want to adjust the Titleist 917 D3 driver, follow the steps given below.

  1. Remove the head of the driver. To do this, you will need to loosen the screw holding the head using the Titleist wrench.
  2. When the head of the driver comes off, line the chosen number and letter combination setting with the white dots that are present on the hosel of the driver.
  3. When you line the letter and number in the right position, place the head of the driver back and start tightening the screw.
  4. When the wrench makes a clicking sound, it means that you should stop tightening the screw. Do not fasten the screw so much that you find it difficult to readjust the settings in Titleist 917 D3 driver again.

When players increase the loft, the driver has an open clubface and generates more spin. In contrast, when they decrease the loft, the driver features a closed clubface and produces less spin.

Sours: https://www.golfstorageguide.com/titleist-917-driver-adjustment-guide/
The New Titleist 917 D2 Driver Review And The SureFit CG.
Earlier in the year we tested the 16 different settings of the Titleist Surefit Hosel to see how much of a difference switching from one setting to the others makes.

The hosel allows for independent setting of loft and lie for woods and hybrids.

The settings run from A1 to D4 with the above chart explaining what each setting does. We took a Titleist 913D3 driver with 8.5 degrees of loft fitted with a Graphite Design Tour Ad Di7 S-flex shaft and hit 6 shots with each setting. The Titleist Pro V1 golf ball was used and tee height was kept constant for each shot. We recorded the results on a Trackman Launch Monitor.


The main parameters of interest were Carry, Total Distance, Launch Angle, Spin Rate, Direction and Height. Swing Speed and Club Path were recorded to see how consistent the swings were.

Conditions were cool enough around 13 degrees with a breeze of 10-15mph against. The results of the test are below.

Setting

Club Speed

Ball Speed

Carry

Total

Side

Launch Angle

Spin Rate

Club Path

Height

A1

Standard

116.7

168.1

252.1

264.9

11.5L

9.3

2947

-2.4

108.1

A2

+1.5 Up

117.1

169.4

250.7

259.6

7.2R

9.7

3001

-3.2

122.5

A3

+1.5 Up +1.5 Loft

116.8

167.7

241.3

247.5

9.3L

11.2

3333

-2.5

143.9

A4

+1.5 Loft

117.5

168.4

243.4

249.0

15.3L

11.4

3569

-3.6

145.5

B1

-0.75 Fl

117.9

170.2

258.3

271.0

12.5L

10.0

2879

-4.1

114.5

B2

+0.75 Up

117.6

167.7

253.8

266.3

5.8L

10.5

2980

-3.4

118.5

B3

+0.75 Up +1.5 Loft

117.7

168.7

244.1

250.5

50.0L

11.0

3357

-2.8

143.3

B4

-0.75 Fl +1.5 Loft

117.9

168.9

244.7

251.3

60.5L

11.8

3301

-3.4

149.0

C1

-0.75 Fl    -.75 Loft

118.0

169.7

244.9

253.2

22.5L

10.2

3199

-3.3

130.3

C2

+0.75Up    -.75 Loft

117.6

170.5

255.3

266.6

21.8L

10.2

2922

-3.9

121.2

C3

+0.75 Up +.75 Loft

117.5

169.4

245.2

252.5

4.1R

10.7

3473

-3.5

138.9

C4

-0.75 Fl +.75 Loft

117.6

165.8

235.9

243.5

7.3L

12.1

3179

-2.6

141.8

D1

-.75 Loft

117.8

169.1

252.4

264.8

19.2L

9.7

3163

-3.9

121.9

D2

 +1.5 Up   -.75 Loft

117.9

170.4

259.9

272.5

46.4L

8.2

3197

-3.9

105.5

D3

+1.5 Up +.75 Loft

117.7

168.9

254.8

265.5

16.6R

9.7

3308

-3.9

127.6

D4

+.75 Loft

118.0

168.6

238.4

249.3

42.2L

8.5

3483

-4.2

116.4

 

Analysis


First to note is the distances are lower then expected for a golfer with approximately 118 mph club head speed. This was due to the headwind. The headwind stayed relatively constant for the test. Also to note is the swing speed and club path of the golfer was quite consistent throughout the test. (Club Head Speed from 116.7 to 118, Path from -2.4 to -4.2) This shows a high level of consistency in the swing meaning the main changes in ball flight came from changing the settings on the driver.

However as a golfer reacts to ball flight, it would be expected the golfer would adjust the swing or club to get a desired ball flight. We tried to minimise this by limiting it to 6 shots with each setting giving the golfer less opportunity to react to the ball flight.

We can see from the above table that there's quite a bit of variance in the settings. The best carry and total was 259.9 and 272.5 yards from the D2 setting, the worst 235.9 and 243.5 yards from the C4 setting. In general the golfer gained more distance with the lower lofted settings D2, A1, A2, B1, B2 and lost distance with the higher lofted settings C4, A3, A4, B3, B4, D4.

A couple of anomalies appeared here in the D3 Setting (+1.5 upright, +0.75 loft), giving more distance then expected. And C1 (-0.75 Fl, -0.75 loft) giving less distance then expected.

Interestingly the lie angle settings which control curvature didn't seem to have much impact on the finishing position of the ball. We would expect more upright settings to move the ball more right to left and promote the ball to finish left and flatter settings to move the ball left to right and promote it to finish right. But some upright settings D3, A2, C3 had the ball finishing right on average and some flat settings B4 had the ball finishing left.

The least accurate setting was B4 (-0.75 flat, +1.5 loft) with the average being 60.5 feet left and the most accurate was C3 (+0.75 Upright, +0.75 loft) with the average being 6.1 feet right. 

 

Conclusion

Changing the settings does make a difference, particularly when it comes to distance. For this golfer there was nearly 30 yards difference in length between the best and worst settings.  If you have a Titleist driver it would be well worth experimenting with the settings to find the best one for you.

Comments and questions are appreciated.







Sours: http://0to300golf.blogspot.com/2014/09/testing-16-settings-of-titleist-surefit.html

Driver titleist settings d3 917

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Titleist Adapter Hitting Ball On Each Setting

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