Emily carter princeton

Emily carter princeton DEFAULT

Emily A. Carter

American chemist

This article is about the UCLA Provost. For the author Emily Carter, see Emily Carter.

Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Emily A. Carter, distinguished professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at UCLA. Picture taken at a UCLA Luskin Town Hall in Los Angeles in Fall 2019.

Emily Ann Carter (born November 28, 1960, in Los Gatos, California) is the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost at UCLA and a distinguished professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.[1] She served from 2016 to 2019 as Princeton's dean of engineering and applied science, before returning to UCLA as EVCP in September 2019.[2] Carter developed her academic career at UCLA from 1988 to 2004, where she helped launch two institutes: the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics and the California NanoSystems Institute. Carter is a theorist and computational scientist whose work combines quantum mechanics, solid-state physics, and applied mathematics.[3] 

Education and career[edit]

Carter received a Bachelor of Science in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1982. She was awarded her Ph.D. in physical chemistry in 1987 from the California Institute of Technology, where she worked with William Andrew Goddard III, studying homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.[3][4]

Carter held a postdoctoral position at the University of Colorado, Boulder, during the 1987–1988 academic year. There she worked with James T. Hynes carrying out studies on the dynamics of (photo-induced) electron transfer in solution and also with Hynes, Giovanni Ciccotti, and Ray Kapral to develop the widely used Blue Moon ensemble, a rare event sampling method for condensed matter simulations.[5][6][7]

From 1988 to 2004, Carter held professorships in Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. During those years, she was the Dr. Lee's Visiting Research Fellow in the Sciences at Christ Church, Oxford (1996), a Visiting Scholar in the Department of Physics at Harvard University (1999), and a Visiting Associate in Aeronautics at the California Institute of Technology (2001). She moved to Princeton University in 2004 as Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Applied and Computational Mathematics. In 2006, she was named Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor. From 2009–2014, she was Co-Director of the Department of Energy Frontier Research Center on Combustion Science. She became the Founding Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment in 2010, Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in 2011, and Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in 2016.[3]

From 2016 to 2019, Carter was Dean of the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science and the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment, as well as a Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University. She was an associated faculty member in the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Department of Chemistry, the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, the Princeton Institute for Computational Science and Engineering (PICSciE), the Princeton Environmental Institute (PEI), and the Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials (PRISM). She was the Founding Director of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment from 2010–2016.

Carter was elected as a member into the National Academy of Engineering (2016) for the development of quantum chemistry computational methods for the design of molecules and materials for sustainable energy.

Research[edit]

Carter has made significant contributions to theoretical and computational chemistry and physics. She has developed ab initio quantum chemistry methods and applied them to the study of materials.[8] Early contributions included methods for accurate description of molecules at the quantum level and an algorithm for identifying transitional states in chemical reactions.[9] She pioneered the combination of ab initio quantum chemistry with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (KMC), molecular dynamics (MD), and quasicontinuum solid mechanics simulations relevant to the study of surfaces and interfaces of materials. She has studied the chemical and mechanical causes and mechanisms of failure in materials such as silicon, germanium, iron and steel. She has also proposed methods for protecting materials from failure.[7]

Carter has developed fast methods for orbital-free density functional theory (OF-DFT) that can be applied to large numbers of atoms.[10] She has also developed embedded correlated wavefunction theory for the study of local condensed matter electronic structure.[11][12] This work has relevance to the understanding of photoelectrocatalysis.[10][13]

Carter's current research focuses on the understanding and design of materials for sustainable energy.[7][14] Applications include conversion of sunlight to electricity, clean and efficient use of biofuels and solid oxide fuel cells, and development of materials for use in fuel-efficient vehicles and fusion reactors.[4][15]

Awards[edit]

Carter's scholarly work has been recognized by a number of national and international awards and honors from a variety of entities, including the following:

Carter is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2008), the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society,[3] the American Vacuum Society (1995),[21] the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science (2009),[22] the National Academy of Inventors (2014),[23] the National Academy of Sciences (2008),[24] and the National Academy of Engineering (2016).[25] She is a fellow of the American Chemical Society.[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Biography | EXECUTIVE VICE CHANCELLOR & PROVOST EMILY A. CARTER". www.evc.ucla.edu. Retrieved 2019-12-27.
  2. ^"UCLA names Emily A. Carter new executive vice chancellor and provost". UCLA. Retrieved 2019-12-27.
  3. ^ abcd"The Carter Group". Princeton University. Retrieved 23 October 2015.
  4. ^ ab"Emily Ann Carter"(PDF). Princeton University. Archived from the original(PDF) on 9 April 2016. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  5. ^Carter, E.A.; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Hynes, James T.; Kapral, Raymond (April 1989). "Constrained reaction coordinate dynamics for the simulation of rare events"(PDF). Chemical Physics Letters. 156 (5): 472–477. Bibcode:1989CPL...156..472C. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.637.2883. doi:10.1016/S0009-2614(89)87314-2. Archived from the original(PDF) on 2016-04-09. Retrieved 2016-03-26.
  6. ^"Autobiography of James T. (Casey) Hynes". The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 112 (2): 191–194. January 2008. doi:10.1021/jp710517n.
  7. ^ abcMadsen, Lynnette (2014). Successful women in ceramics and glass science and engineering. [S.l.]: John Wiley. pp. 29–36. ISBN . Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  8. ^Carter, E. A. (8 August 2008). "Challenges in Modeling Materials Properties Without Experimental Input"(PDF). Science. 321 (5890): 800–803. Bibcode:2008Sci...321..800C. doi:10.1126/science.1158009. PMID 18687955. S2CID 206512850.
  9. ^Carter, Emily A. (April 17, 1997). "Final Technical Report for AFOSR Grant No. F49620-93-1-0145"(PDF). Defense Technical Information Center. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  10. ^ abcAdarlo, Sharon. "Emily Carter is first woman and first Princeton professor to win Hirschfelder Prize". Princeton University. Archived from the original on October 31, 2015. Retrieved October 28, 2015.
  11. ^Libisch, Florian; Huang, Chen; Carter, Emily A. (16 September 2014). "Embedded Correlated Wavefunction Schemes: Theory and Applications". Accounts of Chemical Research. 47 (9): 2768–2775. doi:10.1021/ar500086h. PMID 24873211.
  12. ^Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Huang, Patrick; Carter, Emily A. (March 2009). "All-electron embedded correlated wavefunction theory for condensed matter electronic structure". Chemical Physics Letters. 470 (4–6): 347–352. Bibcode:2009CPL...470..347S. doi:10.1016/j.cplett.2009.01.072.
  13. ^"Renewable Fuels and Chemicals from Photoelectrocatalysis". University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  14. ^"Five Questions with Emily Carter: Seeking Sustainable Energy Solutions". Princeton University. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  15. ^"Kavli Foundation Lecture Series". ACS Chemistry for Life. American Chemical Society. Archived from the original on 7 April 2016. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  16. ^"Joseph O. Hirschfelder Prize". University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  17. ^"Emily Carter Wins Remsen Award". Princeton University. 10 July 2014. Retrieved 23 October 2015.
  18. ^Wang, Linda (April 14, 2014). "Remsen Award To Emily Carter". Chemical & Engineering News. 92 (15): 32. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  19. ^"ACS Award for Computers in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 3 March 2016.
  20. ^"Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics". www.aps.org. Retrieved 2016-10-11.
  21. ^"Society Honors". AVS. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  22. ^Emery, Chris (July 29, 2009). "Carter elected to International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science". Princeton University. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  23. ^"Aksay, Carter named National Academy of Inventors Fellows". Princeton University. Archived from the original on 9 April 2016. Retrieved 26 March 2016.
  24. ^"Podcast Interview: Emily Carter"(PDF). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  25. ^"NAE Members". National Academy of Engineering. Retrieved 21 March 2016.
  26. ^"ACS Fellows Program - American Chemical Society". American Chemical Society. Retrieved 2016-10-11.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emily_A._Carter

Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Emily A. Carter to depart from UCLA

Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Emily A. Carter will be leaving UCLA in December to focus on climate change mitigation at Princeton University, according to a campuswide email on Monday.

According to the announcement, after Carter’s departure from UCLA, Vice Chancellor for Academic Personnel Michael S. Levine will be the interim executive vice chancellor and provost for the rest of the academic year. Levine previously served in this interim position in 2019, following Scott L. Waugh’s decision to step down.

Carter held chemistry and biochemistry faculty positions at UCLA from 1988-2004 before leaving to work at Princeton University from 2004-2019. She served as Princeton’s dean of engineering and applied science from 2016-2019 before returning to UCLA in 2019 to serve as the EVCP.

“It has been an honor to serve as UCLA’s Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost and I am so proud of all we have achieved – from our summer research fellowship program to our commitmentsto advancingdiversity – to move this great institution forward, particularly in the midst of the current pandemic,” she said in an emailed statement. “I am excited for this next chapter, turning my attention back to the pressing issue of climate change mitigation and the important work ahead.”

Chancellor Gene Block said in the announcement that her last day at UCLA will be Dec. 9.

Anushka Chakrabarti | News editor

Chakrabarti is currently the 2021-2022 News editor. She was previously the 2020-2021 assistant News editor for the science and health beat, and she was a former contributor for online. She is also a third-year mathematics and economics student at UCLA.

Chakrabarti is currently the 2021-2022 News editor. She was previously the 2020-2021 assistant News editor for the science and health beat, and she was a former contributor for online. She is also a third-year mathematics and economics student at UCLA.

Sours: https://dailybruin.com/2021/09/30/executive-vice-chancellor-and-provost-emily-a-carter-to-depart-from-ucla
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Emily A. Carter

Emily A. Carter is the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost (EVCP), and Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, at UCLA. Dr. Carter began her independent academic career at UCLA in 1988, rising through the chemistry and biochemistry faculty ranks before moving to Princeton University in 2004, where she spent the next 15 years jointly appointed in mechanical and aerospace engineering and in applied and computational mathematics. During her first stint at UCLA, she helped launch two institutes that still exist today: the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics and the California NanoSystems Institute. While at Princeton, she held the Arthur W. Marks ’19 and the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professorships. After an international search, she was selected to be the Founding Director of Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. From 2010-2016, she oversaw the construction of its award-winning building and state-of-the-art facilities, the development of novel educational and research programs, and the hiring of its faculty and staff. After a national search, she served from 2016-2019 as Princeton’s Dean of Engineering and Applied Science, where she spearheaded major research, education, outreach, and diversity initiatives, before returning to UCLA as EVCP in September 2019. Dr. Carter maintains a very active research presence, developing and applying quantum mechanical simulation techniques to enable discovery and design of molecules and materials for sustainable energy. Her research is supported by multiple grants from the U.S. Department of Defense and the Department of Energy. The author of over 400 publications, Carter has delivered over 550 invited and plenary lectures worldwide and has served on advisory boards spanning a wide range of disciplines. She is the recipient of numerous honors, including election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, U.S. National Academy of Inventors, and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. Carter earned a B.S. in Chemistry from UC Berkeley in 1982 (graduating Phi Beta Kappa) and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Caltech in 1987, followed by a brief postdoc at the University of Colorado, Boulder, before joining the UCLA faculty.

Sours: https://research.seas.ucla.edu/carter/
Emily A. Carter, Quantum Mechanical Stimulations of Millions of Atoms

Emily A. Carter

Emily A. Carter - headshot
Title/Position

Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment

Professor in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment

as of December 10, 2021

Degree

Ph.D, California Institute of Technology, 1987

B.S., University of California, Berkeley, 1982

Research Areas

Short Bio

Emily A. Carter is the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost (EVCP), and Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, at UCLA. Dr. Carter began her independent academic career at UCLA in 1988, rising through the chemistry and biochemistry faculty ranks before moving to Princeton University in 2004, where she spent the next 15 years jointly appointed in mechanical and aerospace engineering and in applied and computational mathematics. During her first stint at UCLA, she helped launch two institutes that still exist today: the Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics and the California NanoSystems Institute. While at Princeton, she held the Arthur W. Marks ’19 and the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professorships. After an international search, she was selected to be the Founding Director of Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. From 2010-2016, she oversaw the construction of its award-winning building and state-of-the-art facilities, the development of novel educational and research programs, and the hiring of its faculty and staff. After a national search, she served from 2016-2019 as Princeton’s Dean of Engineering and Applied Science, where she spearheaded major research, education, outreach, and diversity initiatives, before returning to UCLA as EVCP in September 2019. Dr. Carter maintains a very active research presence, developing and applying quantum mechanical simulation techniques to enable discovery and design of molecules and materials for sustainable energy. Her research is supported by multiple grants from the U.S. Department of Defense and the Department of Energy. The author of over 400 publications, Carter has delivered over 550 invited and plenary lectures worldwide and has served on advisory boards spanning a wide range of disciplines. She is the recipient of numerous honors, including election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, U.S. National Academy of Inventors, and the U.S. National Academy of Engineering. Carter earned a B.S. in Chemistry from UC Berkeley in 1982 (graduating Phi Beta Kappa) and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Caltech in 1987, followed by a brief postdoc at the University of Colorado, Boulder, before joining the UCLA faculty. 

Selected Publications

S. Berman, G. S. Gautam, and E. A. Carter, “Role of Na and Ca as isovalent dopants in Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells,” ACS Sustain. Chem. Eng., 7, 5792 (2019). doi: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.8b05348; Virtual Special Issue on Theories, Mechanisms, Materials, and Devices for Solar Energy Conversion: ACS Sustain. Chem. Eng., 7, 10164 (2019). doi: 10.1021/acssuschemeng.9b02925 (Editorial)

S. Xu and E. A. Carter, “Theoretical insights into heterogeneous (photo)electrochemical CO2 reduction,” Chem. Rev., 119, 6631 (2019). doi: 10.1021/acs.chemrev.8b00481

B. G. del Rio, M. Chen, L. E. González, and E. A. Carter, “Orbital-free density functional theory simulation of collective dynamics coupling in liquid Sn,” J. Chem. Phys., 149, 094504 (2018). (Editor’s Pick) doi: 10.1063/1.5040697; Scilight: doi: 10.1063/1.5054900J. M. P. Martirez and E. A. Carter, “Effects of the Aqueous Environment on the Stability and Chemistry of β-NiOOH Surfaces,” Chem. Mater., 30, 5205 (2018). doi: 10.1021/acs.chemmater.8b01866

J. M. Dieterich and E. A. Carter, “Quantum Solutions for a Sustainable Energy Future,” Nat. Rev. Chem., 1, 0032 (2017). doi: 10.1038/s41570-017-0032

Publications

Sours: https://mae.princeton.edu/people/faculty/carter

Princeton emily carter

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  • John Mark P. MartirezJohn Mark P. MartirezAssistant Project Scientist, University of California, Los AngelesVerified email at g.ucla.edu
  • John A. KeithJohn A. KeithR.K. Mellon Faculty Fellow in Energy, Associate Professor, Chemical & Petroleum Engineering, PITTVerified email at pitt.edu
  • William A GoddardWilliam A GoddardProfessor Chemistry, Materials Science, Applied PhysicsVerified email at caltech.edu
  • Florian LibischFlorian LibischAssociate Professor, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Vienna University of TechnologyVerified email at tuwien.ac.at
  • Michele PavoneMichele PavoneDepartment of Chemical Sciences, University of Naples Federico IIVerified email at unina.it
  • De-en JiangDe-en JiangProfessor of Chemistry, University of California, RiversideVerified email at ucr.edu
  • Niri GovindNiri GovindPacific Northwest National LaboratoryVerified email at pnnl.gov
  • Chen HuangChen HuangAssociate Professor, Department of Scientific Computing - Florida State UniversityVerified email at fsu.edu
  • Peilin LiaoPeilin LiaoPurdue UniversityVerified email at purdue.edu
  • Ana Belén Muñoz-GarcíaAna Belén Muñoz-GarcíaAssociate Professor, Department of Physics, University of Naples Federico IIVerified email at unina.it
  • Andrew RitzmannAndrew RitzmannPacific Northwest National LaboratoryVerified email at pnnl.gov
  • Maytal Caspary TorokerMaytal Caspary TorokerProfessor of Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute ofVerified email at tx.technion.ac.il
  • Michael OrtizMichael OrtizCaltech AND Brown UniversityVerified email at caltech.edu
  • Linan ZhouLinan ZhouSouth China University of TechnologyVerified email at scut.edu.cn
  • Emily JarvisEmily JarvisAsst. Prof. Chemistry and Biochemistry, Loyola Marymount UniversityVerified email at lmu.edu
  • Christine J. WuChristine J. WuLawrence Livermore National LaboratoryVerified email at llnl.gov
  • Martina LessioMartina LessioUniversity of New South Wales (UNSW)Verified email at unsw.edu.au
  • Kuang YuKuang YuTsinghua-Berkeley Shenzhen InstituteVerified email at sz.tsinghua.edu.cn
Sours: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=vluc7z8AAAAJ&hl=en
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Renowned energy expert Emily Carter returns to Princeton to advise PPPL on sustainability science

Emily A. Carter, former dean of the Princeton University School of Engineering and Applied Science, and most recently executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), has been named Senior Strategic Advisor for Sustainability Science at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Steve Cowley, PPPL director, announced today.

The founding director of Princeton University’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Carter, who will also be the Gerhard R. Andlinger '52 Professor in Energy and the Environment and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the university, has earned global recognition for fundamental research contributions as well as for her vision for harnessing science and policy to produce lasting solutions to societal problems, including those of energy and the environment.

“Emily is an international leader in sustainability science from carbon utilization to renewable energy to fusion. I am thrilled that she has agreed to help us contribute to these critical priorities of U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm,” said Steve Cowley, PPPL director.

“I am extremely happy to return to Princeton and to join PPPL in this critical role,” Carter said. “This position is a perfect fit and aligns exactly with my interests and mission. PPPL is unquestionably a national treasure trove of expertise in fusion and energy, and I look forward to working with Steve Cowley and all the superb researchers at the Lab on creating a more sustainable planet.”

Carter was a faculty member at the UCLA for 16 years before joining the Princeton faculty in 2004. She has received many honors for her work, including election to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Engineering. She has served on many advisory boards, including the National Research Council’s Boards on Chemical Sciences and Technology and Energy and Environmental Systems, advisory bodies to the federal government. She also has been a member of the advisory board of another national laboratory, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, for the past five years, and before that served on the Scientific Policy Committee of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Her work in theoretical chemistry and applied mathematics has bridged fundamental science and practical applications. Her research spans the fields of chemistry, physics, applied mathematics and engineering and has included creating quantum mechanical tools for understanding and analyzing the behaviors of large numbers of atoms and electrons in materials. This highly influential work led in recent years to Carter’s research on the discovery and design of materials for generating clean electricity from sunlight and from fuel cells; making fuels and chemicals catalytically from carbon dioxide, water, air, and excess renewable energy; and investigating lightweight metal alloys for fuel-efficient vehicles and fusion reactor walls. A sought-after public speaker on sustainable energy, she is the author of more than 400 publications and has delivered more than 500 invited and plenary lectures worldwide.

Carter became executive vice chancellor and provost at UCLA in 2019. She previously was at Princeton, most recently as the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment and dean of the engineering school from 2016 to 2019. Prior to her tenure as dean, she served as Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment’s founding director. In that role, Carter curated the development of its physical infrastructure, interdisciplinary ecosystem and intellectual community. As dean of engineering, she led 10 academic units comprising six departments and four interdisciplinary centers and institutes and 12 undergraduate certificate programs.

She had served on the UCLA chemistry faculty from 1988 to 2004 and materials science and engineering faculty from 2002 to 2004, and helped establish UCLA’s Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics and the California NanoSystems Institute.

Carter is the recipient of several major prizes, including the 2017 Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics from the American Physical Society and the 2018 Award in Theoretical Chemistry from the American Chemical Society. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley, and her Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology, both in chemistry.

PPPL, on Princeton University's Forrestal Campus in Plainsboro, N.J., is devoted to creating new knowledge about the physics of plasmas — ultra-hot, charged gases — and to developing practical solutions for the creation of fusion energy. The Laboratory is managed by the University for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, which is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, visit energy.gov/science.

Sours: https://www.pppl.gov/news/2021/renowned-energy-expert-emily-carter-returns-princeton-advise-pppl-sustainability-science

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Eminent researcher and leader Emily Carter to return to Princeton with focus on climate

By Engineering Communications

Woman stands with her arms crossed underneath archways

Emily Carter, former dean of engineering and an eminent researcher in a wide range of science and engineering fields related to sustainability, will return to the Princeton University faculty effective Dec. 10.

Carter, who served from 2019 to now as executive vice chancellor and provost of the University of California, Los Angeles, had been a Princeton faculty member for 15 years and will return as the Gerhard R. Andlinger ’52 Professor in Energy and the Environment and Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. She also will serve in a newly created role of senior strategic advisor for sustainability science at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory at Princeton.

Carter said her return to Princeton reflects her decision to focus fully on helping solve problems of climate change and environmental sustainability. Before becoming dean of engineering in 2016, Carter was the founding director of Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, now one of the world’s leading centers for energy technology research and energy systems analysis.

“In the last year, it has become clearer to me than ever that we have a small window of opportunity to make a difference on averting the worst effects of climate change,” Carter said. “Climate change has only accelerated. In California we have witnessed some of the worst wildfires in history. I have been horrified, and feel the need to return fulltime to advancing the science, engineering and policy we need to protect our planet and humanity.”

Dean of Engineering Andrea Goldsmith said she is thrilled to welcome Carter back to Princeton and its engineering faculty. “Emily Carter is a pre-eminent researcher and leader with incredible vision and impact,” Goldsmith said. “Even while serving in major leadership roles at Princeton and UCLA, Emily maintained a world-class research group advancing knowledge in the critical area of sustainable energy. She brings her knowledge, experience and leadership in climate and sustainability back to Princeton at a time of major growth in those research areas across the University, which will help ensure Princeton continues to lead in knowledge creation and impact in these areas.”

Carter also will bring her expertise to PPPL, a national center for research on harnessing nuclear fusion as a near-limitless source of clean energy and related areas of advanced science and technology.

“Emily Carter is an international leader in sustainability science, from carbon utilization to renewable energy to fusion. I am absolutely delighted that Emily has agreed to help the Laboratory contribute to these critical priorities of U.S. Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm,” said Steve Cowley, PPPL director.

Carter’s role at PPPL builds on previous experience advising national labs. She has been a member of the advisory board of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for the past five years, and previously served on the Scientific Policy Committee of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Her work in theoretical chemistry and applied mathematics has bridged fundamental science and practical applications. Her research spans the fields of chemistry, physics, applied mathematics and engineering and has included creating quantum mechanical tools for understanding and analyzing the behaviors of large numbers of atoms and electrons in materials. This highly influential work led in recent years to Carter’s research on the discovery and design of materials for generating clean electricity from sunlight and from fuel cells; making fuels and chemicals catalytically from carbon dioxide, water, air, and excess renewable energy; and investigating lightweight metal alloys for fuel-efficient vehicles and fusion reactor walls. A sought-after public speaker on sustainable energy, she is the author of more than 400 publications and has delivered more than 500 invited and plenary lectures worldwide.

Carter is the recipient of numerous honors, including election to the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. She is also the recipient of several major prizes, including the 2017 Irving Langmuir Prize in Chemical Physics from the American Physical Society and the 2018 Award in Theoretical Chemistry from the American Chemical Society.

Sours: https://acee.princeton.edu/acee-news/eminent-researcher-and-leader-emily-carter-to-return-to-princeton-with-focus-on-climate/


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