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Electric Power &#; Chip Erwin&#;s new development (4/15)

By Dan Johnson || 2 Comments

Electric aircraft are a major buzz with even aviation gian Airbus working on their eFan. That's still years away and will surely be expensive. However, SportCruiser developer Chip Erwin has an all-new motor with specially adapted battery. The details should impress you and he is also developing new single place airplanes -- that he calls PSA or Personal Sport Aircraft -- which will be powered by the new electric propulsion.

Electric aircraft are a major buzz with even aviation gian Airbus working on their eFan. That&#;s still years away and will surely be expensive. However, SportCruiser developer Chip Erwin has an all-new motor with specially adapted battery. The details should impress you and he is also developing new single place airplanes &#; that he calls PSA or Personal Sport Aircraft &#; which will be powered by the new electric propulsion.

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Aviad &#; Zigolo MG12 (electric motoglider )

By Dan Johnson || 2 Comments

How about an electric airplane you can buy for less than $20,? Delivered as "almost ready to fly" Italy's Zigolo is offered in the USA at South Lakeland Airpark (where you see this aircraft flying). Proprietor Chip Erwin, originator of the SportCruiser, tells us how he added electric power to Zigolo and flew it cross country to Sun 'n Fun This is not a family travel airplane but for those who enjoy soaring or leisure flying, Zigolo represents an economical purchse.

How about an electric airplane you can buy for less than $20,? Delivered as &#;almost ready to fly&#; Italy&#;s Zigolo is offered in the USA at South Lakeland Airpark (where you see this aircraft flying). Proprietor Chip Erwin, originator of the SportCruiser, tells us how he added electric power to Zigolo and flew it cross country to Sun &#;n Fun This is not a family travel airplane but for those who enjoy soaring or leisure flying, Zigolo represents an economical purchse.

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What Will 15 Days and $15, Get You?

By Dan Johnson || Leave a Comment

This website focuses on the affordable end of aviation. However, "affordable" is a relative term. I've written about Icon's A5, which may set the bar highest among Light-Sport Aircraft at around $, for a well-equipped LSA seaplane. (See our Video Pilot Report.) If you had the money would you buy an A5 or a Cessna Skyhawk for around $, You probably have a response but then, the question is rhetorical because most readers likely don't have a quarter-million to do drop on a LSA, no matter how magnificent it may be. I've also written about the $16, (or so) fully-built Aerolite Some think that's a wonderful deal on a very nice single seat airplane. Yet at least one person wrote on my Dan Johnson Media / Affordable Aviation Facebook page that even Aerolite is too expensive. Fair enough. We all have different budgets. Some people can buy an $, single engine Cirrus. For others five grand is closer to what they want to spend. Aviation enthusiasts are all kinds of people. However, with the average price of a new car around $33, these days (according to Kelly Bluebook), $15, for an airworthy motorglider seems to represent a mighty fine value. Recently Aeromarine LSA's Chip Erwin told me about such an aircraft delivered to South American to customer, Marco Peter. Let's jet down to Lima Peru and visit the project. Nearby images show the Zigolo going together and taking flight over Peru. "Zigolo was built from a kit in only 15 days in the basement garage of the owner Marco Peter," said Chip. The finished aircraft was then transported to a small desert airstrip just south of Lima for the test flight. "The mission was to finish the Zigolo build, test fly, and show Marco how to fly all in the short term of Nov 3 to 23, That's just 20 days less two Sunday afternoons off to watch the Packers," said Chip. He hails from Florida these days, but grew up in Wisconsin and those Packer loyalties run deep and last long. Even with time out for football, Chip reported, "This mission was accomplished with a day to spare." First test flights were made by Chip with Marco making several flights in his new ultralight motorglider afterward but all in the short window of time. For another perspective on how Zigolo flies, read this evaluation by famous British journalist text pilot, Dave Unwin. The mission proved the Part capable Zigolo can be built as quickly as advertised. What Chip didn't mention was the bargain price of the machine. As we told you at its first U.S. appearance — see the second half of this article — Zigolo is another three axis bargain. Sold as "almost ready to fly" for less than $16,, you can save even more by assembling the lightweight airplane in less than hours for a mere $14, (though prices change over time so check with Aeromarine LSA for the newest pricing but read on ). Through Chip's tireless efforts Zigolo also introduced versatility. Zigolo can also be purchased to fly with pure electric power and even that package will be available ready-to-fly for less than $20, Hear more about the eZigolo in this video "The electric Zigolo is now in flight testing," said Chip. "Clean, smooth, reliable, and quiet electric flight is coming soon!" Visit Aeromarine LSA to follow developments and read the latest news on their electric-powered aircraft. Marco's Zigolo was a gas-powered edition. "Zigolo is a Part ultralight that doubles as an inexpensive motorglider," explained Chip. "Marco's friend Alex flew Zigolo on the nearby ridge and saw FPM climb with the engine at idle. Prices for the Zigolo start at only $12, engine & propeller included! Total cost of the paint was $20! We used a high-quality exterior latex paint with UV protection." So, 15 days and $15, can put you in the sky. Is it for you? Check out this video:

This website focuses on the affordable end of aviation. However, &#;affordable&#; is a relative term. I&#;ve written about Icon&#;s A5, which may set the bar highest among Light-Sport Aircraft at around $, for a well-equipped LSA seaplane. (See our Video Pilot Report.) If you had the money would you buy an A5 or a Cessna Skyhawk for around $, You probably have a response but then, the question is rhetorical because most readers likely don&#;t have a quarter-million to do drop on a LSA, no matter how magnificent it may be. I&#;ve also written about the $16, (or so) fully-built Aerolite Some think that&#;s a wonderful deal on a very nice single seat airplane. Yet at least one person wrote on my Dan Johnson Media / Affordable Aviation Facebook page that even Aerolite is too expensive. Fair enough. We all have different budgets.

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PSA: An Affordable Aircraft?

By Dan Johnson || Leave a Comment

The original TechPro Merlin soon to emerge with a new purpose as a Personal Sport Aircraft.

Guest editorial author Chip Erwin displays his new electric motor and distinctive prop. Note the unorthodox blade position.

The following article is a guest editorial by Chip Erwin, a name many rightfully associate with the highly successful SportCruiser LSA. A restless entrepreneur, Chip has been working behind the curtain for several years. He emerged with the Zigolo and is now proposing a fresh name for a segment that seems to have energy behind it. I have reported on England's new SSDR category and I have observed the rejuvenation of Part vehicles. So, on our recent travels to China, I encouraged Chip to express what he has in mind. Article Update 6/15/15 — At the end of this article see our video shot at Sun 'n Fun regarding Chip's electric motor and plans. Is "affordable aircraft" an oxymoron? For most people, probably yes. One answer could be a class of aircraft I like to refer to as a PSA, or Personal Sport Aircraft. Personal Sport Aircraft can describe a renewed interest in single place aircraft. These are priced far less than LSA but are not confined by the limitations of Part ultralights. So what describes a PSA? Following are some worthy attributes: Price target between $32, and $45, * Powered by a 4-stroke aircraft engine or by electric propulsion Can be flown with Sport Pilot license without a medical Fully enclosed and conventional aircraft style and construction Good performance and handling: cruise about mph; slow stall Responsive handling and intended for day VFR operation Appealing appearance * not much more than a Harley-Davidson or Honda Goldwing motorcycle; affordable for many I should point out that a PSA by my definition and by cost constraints is necessarily a single-seat aircraft. Two-seat aircraft would put us right back into LSA where the engine alone costs $20, contributing to higher finished aircraft cost. If someone did a study I think they would find out that the vast majority of recreational flights last around 45 minutes and are commonly flown solo so maybe having only one seat is not a bad trade-off to save six figures. Also, honestly, if another study was done, many "significant others" would be silently relieved that they would not be able to go flying with their spouses' new toy. Consider Mooney's Mite — The Mite was designed by Al Mooney and was intended as a personal airplane marketed to fighter pilots returning from World War II. However, it was priced 20% higher than most of the two-seat competitors at the time. Had it been priced significantly lower than the two seaters it may have been a greater success. Nonetheless, Mite enjoyed a production run of units, very respectable in today's market. A few aircraft might presently fit this new PSA class but they fail in some criteria. Many use two-stroke engines, are dated designs or construction, are unattractive to many pilots, or are too expensive. Chip observes that for a variety of reasons modern LSA, while impressive small aircraft, have become too expensive for many limiting their appeal. —DJ Truly affordable aircraft can be found in Part ultralights but fine as some of these are, their appeal is also limited, for example, most are open cockpit designs. A void in the availability of a dependable horsepower four-stroke aircraft engine may be one reason we see few PSA. Some development of new four-stroke engines is occurring but the ones I've examined are heavier and provide less power than popular two-stroke engines. How about electric power? — What works with electric propulsion today are low drag, lightweight aircraft that do not require much power to fly. A PSA is nearly perfect in definition. Heavier two-seat aircraft cannot offer the endurance, instilling "range anxiety," and are still too expensive. Until battery energy capacity increases significantly electric power may be limited to PSA. My personal experience with electric power shows it can be ideal if: the aircraft can carry enough battery to fly for an hour (hard to do while meeting Part ) the motor can provide enough power at low RPM (to reduce prop noise closer to electric motor noise) The entire system can be designed and integrated for safe operation I have been researching electric power, a technology with huge potential, and I believe a PSA is the perfect place to start. A new electric motor I am developing is designed specifically for aircraft use meaning it has high torque, low RPM, light weight and high reliability. Concurrently a new battery system I am creating has one of the highest Lithium Polymer (LiPo) power densities commercially available and is integrated with the motor, controller, and battery management system to provide safe, reliable operation. Electric power can work well using a PSA with today's technology. If properly designed, it should provide an endurance of more than one hour. Those who want to fly farther and faster could couple the electric motor with a small four-stroke aircraft engine for a viable hybrid. FAA is pondering a regulatory approach to electric propulsion but Experimental Amateur Built rules allow customers to build whatever they want. With a simple design and modern construction methods of matched-hole and jig-less assembly build time can be measured in weeks not years. Britain's CAA published a revised SSDR (Single-Seat Deregulated) rule that allows the sale of a finished single seat aircraft up to kilograms ( pounds) gross weight when equipped with an airframe parachute and a reasonable maximum stall speed of 35 knots (40 mph). This is a perfect PSA rule which I hope will spread to other countries. The future may reward development of viable electric and four-stroke power systems and single seat airframes with modern construction and ramp appeal. Let's call them Personal Sport Aircraft. Contact Chip about his new aircraft through his business, Aeromarine LSA. Added 6/15/ See our new video about Chip's electric motor, its innovative battery arrangement, pricing, and plans to finish the development.

The following article is a guest editorial by Chip Erwin, a name many rightfully associate with the highly successful SportCruiser LSA. A restless entrepreneur, Chip has been working behind the curtain for several years. He emerged with the Zigolo and is now proposing a fresh name for a segment that seems to have energy behind it. I have reported on England&#;s new SSDR category and I have observed the rejuvenation of Part vehicles. So, on our recent travels to China, I encouraged Chip to express what he has in mind. Article Update 6/15/15 — At the end of this article see our video shot at Sun &#;n Fun regarding Chip&#;s electric motor and plans. Is &#;affordable aircraft&#; an oxymoron? For most people, probably yes. One answer could be a class of aircraft I like to refer to as a PSA, or Personal Sport Aircraft.

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Zigolo Cracks the China Market as Part !

By Dan Johnson || Leave a Comment

Chip Erwin flies Zigolo at Sun 'n Fun using electric power. Read our pilot report article by British writer Dave Unwin.

Zigolo on display at the Jingmen airshow in China.

Here's the gasoline engine; the electric-powered version is shown at top.

I didn't see this one coming. Maybe you didn't either? In the new millennia gold rush represented by companies either being bought by Chinese businesses or gaining investment from wealthy Chinese business people or by setting up shop to sell in China (or even Cessna's ill-fated effort to have their Skycatcher manufactured in China), one element I've never heard of is Part in China. This least-regulated-of-all aviation category is solely an American thing, isn't it? Well yes and no. Germany has opened the door to a Part like development in that country under the kilogram class (using a number that is pounds or very similar to Part 's pound empty weight limit). England has their SSDR class (SSDR being the abbreviation for Single Seat De-Regulated). Despite following those developments, I've never heard a word about China and any less-regulated sector. "The first Zigolo in China was introduced to the public in that nation on July 17th at the Jingmen Airshow," reported representative Chip W. Erwin. The example was supplied in kit form by Aeromarine-LSA of Lakeland, Florida and Chip assembled it in just three weeks. Erwin, many will recall, was the main man behind the SportCruiser that ranks high in the U.S. market. After getting pushed out of the company he founded by an aggressive investor, he established a new enterprise in China. So, the following announcement might be expected, "Concurrently [to the aircraft's debut], a Zigolo assembly facility was established in the AVIC R&D center in Jingmen to supply the Chinese market with Ready-to-Fly (RTF) Zigolos." Now, here's the part of their announcement that caught me by surprise. "The Chinese CAAC recognizes the FAA Part rule," Chip related, "which means that Chinese customers can actually fly legally and fly now in China, something that has not been so easy in LSA or other GA aircraft to date." No kidding! Virtually everyone agrees the China market for aircraft is potentially enormous, but the key word is "potentially." It is developing but seems in well in the future. Maybe not. If Chinese authorities permit Part aircraft now, Zigolo could have a near-term impact on that market. Given its extremely low price, many Chinese flying enthusiasts could climb aboard. "The Chinese have been shipping thousands of RTF radio-controlled (RC) model aircraft to the USA," notes Erwin. "Now they will have the capability to build a man-carrying light aircraft for their own market. Chip noted that the technology and design gap between large RC aircraft and this ultralight motorglider is small; with the coming electric-powered version of the Zigolo, the gap narrows further. Want to know more? Zigolo is presently available to Americans in kit form with typical build time estimated at about hours. Delivery positions are now available for the RTF version and first deliveries are planned for later in Come get a closer look at both electric- and gas-powered Zigolo ultralights at Airventure Oshkosh Watch how each flies in the ultralight area — now referred to as the "Fun Fly Zone" by area organizers. Oshkosh attendees can find Zigolo at booth Aeromarine-LSA plans to offer an Oshkosh show special for new orders. I love the tagline Chip invented as it sums up the well-priced, simple aircraft — Zigolo: everything you need, and not much else.

I didn&#;t see this one coming. Maybe you didn&#;t either? In the new millennia gold rush represented by companies either being bought by Chinese businesses or gaining investment from wealthy Chinese business people or by setting up shop to sell in China (or even Cessna&#;s ill-fated effort to have their Skycatcher manufactured in China), one element I&#;ve never heard of is Part in China. This least-regulated-of-all aviation category is solely an American thing, isn&#;t it? Well &#; yes and no. Germany has opened the door to a Part like development in that country under the kilogram class (using a number that is pounds or very similar to Part &#;s pound empty weight limit). England has their SSDR class (SSDR being the abbreviation for Single Seat De-Regulated). Despite following those developments, I&#;ve never heard a word about China and any less-regulated sector. &#;The first Zigolo in China was introduced to the public in that nation on July 17th at the Jingmen Airshow,&#; reported representative Chip W.

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Flying the Zigolo Motorglider &#; a Pilot Report

By Dave Unwin || Leave a Comment

For many of us, the principal reason we fly is for fun. Not to go anywhere but up, or for no other reason than that the sky is always waiting, but never impatient. Unfortunately this very pure idea became subverted along the way, as the Cubs and Champs of our forefathers were replaced by the efficient but banal and PA As the fun diminished the costs rose in proportion. One of the original ideas behind the whole LSA concept was affordability, but with some aircraft now priced up to $, that particular principle seems to have been forgotten [though more modestly priced LSA do remain available]. Consequently, when Chip Erwin of Aeromarine LSA told me at the Sebring LSA Expo that he was bringing a new aircraft to market that required minimal assembly yet cost only $16, including the motor and a parachute rescue system you can bet I was interested. Called Zigolo and made in Italy, it is a super-lightweight motorglider designed to meet Single Seat De-Regulated (SSDR) rules. [See more SSDR examples.] It was the great Leonardo (da Vinci, not di Caprio) who observed that, "simplicity is the ultimate sophistication" — and this seemingly simple machine is indeed quite sophisticated. Looking rather like a 's Slingsby T 'Grasshopper' primary glider, it features a traditional tubular structure with the wings and tail surfaces covered with fabric. It is currently powered by a two-stroke single cylinder Vittorazi Moster engine that produces 25 horsepower yet only weighs a very impressive 25 pounds, although Chip also told me that plans to produce an electric-powered version are well advanced. Lightweight and fun, the Zigolo is also extremely competitively priced. As previously mentioned, the Almost-Ready-To-Fly version (which — it is claimed — can be assembled in an afternoon) is $16, The classic kit is only $14,, with a claimed build time of about hours. I flew it the week following the show, becoming only the second Zigolo pilot in the US of A in the process. While having a quick poke round it at Aeromarine LSA's South Lakeland base before taking it up for a quick flip, I couldn't help but notice that some of the engineering and materials were perhaps not quite of the high standard I've come to expect from Chip, but in his defense his primary agenda had been to fly an aircraft into the show — and he did. Production kits will use AN bolts, and the other minor snags I noticed will be addressed. As you'd expect the instruments are an object display in minimalism, being a single LCD unit for rpm, CHT etc., plus a very simple ASI. Intriguingly the Zigolo is offered with a choice of whole aircraft recovery systems as standard — either a rocket-propelled BRS or the pneumatic Comelli system. The empty weight is pounds and it's 18 feet long, with a wingspan of 36 feet 4 inches and a wing loading of pounds per square foot. Zigolo stalls at 19 knots, cruises at 36 knots while burning gallons per hour and has a Vne of 52 knots, while the minimum sink rate is fpm and the best glide a claimed Anyway, that's enough facts and figures — is this thing as much fun to fly as it looks? Absolutely! Having strapped it onto me (well, that's what it feels like) Chip gave the pull-start an energetic tug and the little motor burst into life. With Chip's parting words ringing in my ears — "no stalls, spins or high-speed stuff — we haven't had a chance to expand the envelope yet" — I resolved to keep everything right in the middle and just buzz around while getting a feel for the thing. As I'd expected, as you have three wheels, no brakes and a fixed tailwheel (a castoring unit is in design) the trickiest part is taxiing. It requires a certain boldness, as the only way to do a is stick full forward, squeeze the trigger (to blip the engine), full rudder and deftly pirouette while blipping the engine to keep the tail up! Oh, did I mention the throttle? It's a trigger on the stick. [As Dave mentioned above, instrumentation is similarly basic, for one, using the elegantly simple Hall Windspeed Meter that never needs a battery or any maintenance. Very simple aircraft like Zigolo do not need fancy glass cockpits to operate as a motorglider — ideally going aloft for engine shut down to exploring soaring flight, an act that will be even easier with an electric motor in the works. However, adding Garmin's Aera touchscreen GPS might be useful as would be a variometer, another compact and efficient device to measure lift. Both are light, small, and battery-powered. —DJ]Once lined up I realized that there really isn't anything to either check, set or adjust, so simply squeeze the trigger and off I jolly well went. The acceleration is reasonably good, and got better once I lifted the tiny tailwheel off the ground. As it slid into the sky I immediately saw the attraction of this curious contraption. The forward field of view is exceptional, the aircraft feels surprisingly stable and it's just — well — fun! As I know this is the sole Zigolo in the country and it has only a few hours on it I content myself with buzzing up and down the runway for Jim Lawrence's camera and making lots of take offs and landings. It's a real hoot, and I'd love to fly the electric version on a gentle summer's evening and spend a lazy hour simply floating about as the last of the day's thermals waft out of a warm wood. One of my favorite maxims is "never fly over anything you can't glide clear of" — and having an electric motor would definitely be nice, as with a best L/D of only Zigolo won't glide too far. Of course, all SSDRs have their limitations. Quite obviously, any wind much more than a gentle zephyr would make flying it most disagreeable. However, if you want a simple, affordable machine whose primary purpose is to simply allow people to experience the joy of flight then this could be just the thing. So can the Zigolo make sport flying truly affordable? I hope so. As the late but not overly lamented Spice Girls might have put it, I really, really, really want to zig-a-zig Zigolo!

For many of us, the principal reason we fly is for fun. Not to go anywhere but up, or for no other reason than that the sky is always waiting, but never impatient. Unfortunately this very pure idea became subverted along the way, as the Cubs and Champs of our forefathers were replaced by the efficient but banal and PA As the fun diminished the costs rose in proportion. One of the original ideas behind the whole LSA concept was affordability, but with some aircraft now priced up to $, that particular principle seems to have been forgotten [though more modestly priced LSA do remain available]. Consequently, when Chip Erwin of Aeromarine LSA told me at the Sebring LSA Expo that he was bringing a new aircraft to market that required minimal assembly yet cost only $16, including the motor and a parachute rescue system you can bet I was interested.

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Last News Rush Before Sebring &#;

By Dan Johnson || Leave a Comment

Progressive Aerodyne's Searey Elite won FAA airworthiness with the Rotax engine.

And now for something completely different: Aeromarine-LSA's Zigolo MG

Rotax expert Phil Lockwood will give his signature engine presentations at Sebring

People are starting to arrive in Florida. Today, we had a pleasant lunch conversation with Dynon's president Robert Hamilton. He observed that Dynon enjoyed their best year ever in and they continue bringing new avionics innovations at modest prices. Fellow Dynon staffer Kirk Kleinholz was in the state even earlier traveling around offering tech support. Great work, Dynon-ers! As we all enter the last-minute rush to head to the tenth Sebring, a few news items arrived and I'll run through them so you have some idea of what will be present at the LSA event. Progressive Aerodyne announced they received FAA acceptance for the Elite version of their Searey Amphibious LSA. Searey Elite is mightily powered with a Rotax turbocharged engine; you can see a short video of it launching in this article. "This stylish aircraft offers many advanced features such as a large sliding canopy that can remain open while flying. The Searey Elite also has the very latest in-flight, GPS, [Angle of Attack indicator] and Gear Position warning systems, a wide cabin, and much more," said the company. Airworthiness certification for the Searey Elite was issued in December , and the first two airplanes will go to private owners in January at a ceremony to be held at Progressive Aerodyne's manufacturing facility in Tavares, Florida. Searey Elite will also be on display at Sebring Adam Yang, CEO of Progressive Aerodyne, had this to say about the certification of the Searey Elite, "We are so pleased and excited about being able to offer our Searey Light Sport Amphibious Elite to the market. We believe that our airplane fulfills a much anticipated desire for those customers who want to experience the fun and adventure of flight, both in the air and on water, with ease." Unlike some intriguing LSA seaplanes, you can buy a ready-to-fly Searey or Searey Elite now. Something completely new: Aeromarine-LSA — a company name you may not know though you know some of their products such as Mermaid amphibious LSA -- from a familiar name in the industry, Chip Erwin. Aeromarine-LSA announced the first American flight of the new Zigolo SSDR concept motorglider. A Single Seat De-Regulated (SSDR) aircraft, Zigolo does not require any license, medical, registration, or certification to fly it. SSDR is a European initiative that closely resembles Part but at pounds empty, this superlightweight flying machine will have no trouble qualifying. The foot span Zigolo is powered by a horsepower gasoline engine, however, the company said an electric-powered option is close to completion. Electric power will provide self-launching capability for gliding or quiet and smooth dawn patrols and evening flights and still met the SSDR criteria. Zigolo is available in a classic kit for only $14, This price includes the engine and a complete aircraft rescue parachute system. Build time is only hours. An even better option is the Almost-Ready-To-Fly aircraft referring to a finished Zigolo disassembled and packed in one easy-to-ship crate. "Some Assembly required" means a pictogram assembly manual and an afternoon to put it together! The Almost RTF Zigolo includes everything you need to fly plus a complete aircraft parachute rescue system all for only $16,, just $1, more than the hour kit. Aeromarine provided this video of the Zigolo MG12 performing flight maneuvers including wing mounted viewpoints. The Rotax guy that Rotax mechanics seek for advice is Phil Lockwood. As the largest Rotax distributor and service center in the country, he and his team have learned the old fashioned way about problems by working on hundreds of engines and seeing any problems for themselves. Lockwood also has a direct connection forged over many years with Kodiac guru Eric Tucker and the folks at the factory in Austria always check in with Lockwood to see what's happening with their engines in the field. So when it's THIS guy, Phil Lockwood, who offers you his advice for free in an airshow forum, people flock to the venue. Phil will be doing his standing-room-only presentation again at Sebring: Rotax series on Thursday the 16th and Saturday the 18th in Forum Area 2 from am to noon. A Rotax two stroke forum will be held on Friday the 17th from am to noon in Forum Area 2. Phil also added, "Lockwood Aviation Supply will offer special extended hours for customers who would like to shop and pick up parts during the Sebring US Sport Aviation Expo. The company's warehouse is located at 1 Lockwood lane just a few hundred yards to the south from the show on the Ramp at the Sebring Airport." Hours are Saturday from AM to PM and Sunday from AM till PM.

People are starting to arrive in Florida. Today, we had a pleasant lunch conversation with Dynon&#;s president Robert Hamilton. He observed that Dynon enjoyed their best year ever in and they continue bringing new avionics innovations at modest prices. Fellow Dynon staffer Kirk Kleinholz was in the state even earlier traveling around offering tech support. Great work, Dynon-ers! As we all enter the last-minute rush to head to the tenth Sebring, a few news items arrived and I&#;ll run through them so you have some idea of what will be present at the LSA event. Progressive Aerodyne announced they received FAA acceptance for the Elite version of their Searey Amphibious LSA. Searey Elite is mightily powered with a Rotax turbocharged engine; you can see a short video of it launching in this article. &#;This stylish aircraft offers many advanced features such as a large sliding canopy that can remain open while flying.

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Sours: https://bydanjohnson.com/category/manufacturers/aviad/zigolo-mg/

Aviad Zigolo MG12

Zigolo MG12
Role Single-seat kitbuilt ultralight
National originItaly
Manufacturer Aviad Francesco Di Martino
Designer Francesco Di Martino
First flight
Number built20 kits delivered by March

The Aviad Zigolo MG12 is an Italiankitbuilt introductory motor-glider first flown in It has a small engine and limited gliding performance but is inexpensive to buy and run and simple to build and fly. Kit production began in and by the following year twenty had been sold.

Design[edit]

Designed by Francesco Di Martino, the Zigolo is based on the unpowered Sandlin Goatprimary glider. The design priority was to produce a motor-glider which would be inexpensive to build, transport and store. It is marketed as a powered glider but qualifies in the UK as an SSDR (single-seat, deregulated) microlight. Kit build time is quoted as less than hrs. It can be dismantled for transport and reassembled for flight within an hour.[1]

Its structure throughout is based on aluminium tubes, its flying surfaces covered with bonded fabric. It has a high, braced, wing of rectangular plan with blunted tips, rigged with 3° of dihedral. The ailerons occupy the whole of the trailing edges apart from a central gap.[1]

The fuselage is an uncovered tube structure, with the exposed pilot's seat on a pair of tubes which form the basis of the forward section with a curved reinforcing girder under it. The primary wing bracing, V-struts from the wing spars, are attached to them. They meet at the nose, where another tube joins them to the forward spar. Behind the wing the lower fuselage member is a single tube, braced at its forward end by a pair of tubes upwards to the rear spar and at its rear by another long pair to the rear spar. A horizontal pair of tubes from the rear spar to a vertical rudder post, which joins the lower fuselage tube at its base, complete the rear frame. The upper frame supports a straight-edged tailplane with balanced elevators and a balanced rudder which extends from the keel to above the tailplane via an elevator cut-out.[1]

The Zigolo's &#;hp (&#;kW) single-cylinder two-stroke engine is mounted on the fuselage frame in pusher configuration below the wing trailing edge. Its propeller is driven through belt gearing, the top of the propeller disc in the gap between the ailerons. An optional electric engine is also available.[1][2]

It has fixed landing gear with small mainwheels mounted &#;m (3&#;ft 7&#;in) apart on split axles hinged from a central pylon below the main fuselage frame. Gas shock absorbers lean in from the axles' extremities to the lower frame. There is a small tailwheel. The Zingalo is fitted with a ballistic parachute mounted on the sloping fuselage member ahead of the pilot.[1]

Development[edit]

The Zigolo first flew in and later that year the prototype was joined by a demonstrator. The first production aircraft appeared at the April Friedrichshafen show; by then the type had flown more than hrs. Twenty kits had been sold by March to builders across Europe, China, Japan and the US.[1] There are two on the UK register in [3]

Specifications[edit]

Data from General, Jane's All the World's Aircraft /16;[1] Performance, PilotWeb[4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: One
  • Length: &#;m (18&#;ft 1&#;in)
  • Wingspan: &#;m (36&#;ft 5&#;in)
  • Height: [4]&#;m (4&#;ft 3&#;in)
  • Wing area: &#;m2 (&#;sq&#;ft)
  • Empty weight: 95&#;kg (&#;lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: &#;kg (&#;lb)
  • Fuel capacity: 12&#;l (&#;imp&#;gal; &#;US&#;gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Vittorazi Moster [4] single cylinder two-stroke, &#;kW (&#;hp)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed, &#;m (4&#;ft 7&#;in) diameter fixed pitch, driven via belt reduction gearing

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 67&#;km/h (41&#;mph, 36&#;kn)
  • Stall speed: 35&#;km/h (22&#;mph, 19&#;kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 93&#;km/h (58&#;mph, 50&#;kn)
  • Maximum glide ratio: at 52&#;km/h; 32&#;mph (28&#;kn)
  • Rate of sink: &#;m/s (&#;ft/min) engine off, 44&#;km/h; 28&#;mph (24&#;kn)
  • Wing loading: &#;kg/m2 (&#;lb/sq&#;ft)

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefgGunston, Bill (). Jane's All the World's Aircraft &#;: development & production&#;: . IHS Global. p.&#; ISBN&#;.
  2. ^Tacke, Willi; Marino Boric; et al: World Directory of Light Aviation , page Flying Pages Europe SARL, ISSN&#;X
  3. ^"UK aircraft register". Retrieved 19 August
  4. ^ abcDave Unwin (29 August ). "PilotWeb". Retrieved 12 August
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aviad_Zigolo_MG12
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Zigolo MG12 Kit

The Zigolo is unique in that it not only may be flown like a classic ultralight in smooth dawn or evening patrol conditions but also performs well as a motor-glider and can float in thermalling conditions. Two aircraft in one!

The AVIAD Zigolo MG12 is an SSDR motor glider designed and manufactured in Italy offering an alternative flying experience.

It has slow flight characteristics plus a short landing and takeoff distance of 50 meters. This is a new departure in the form of a minimal three axis SSDR Motor Glider perfectly suited for fun flying.

The AVIAD Zigolo MG12 is specifically designed for simple construction and low cost of ownership, it has a traditional tubular frame structure and simple bonded fabric covering thus providing a very robust design.

It incorporates several additional novel design features, a forward pilot cockpit protected by the fuselage frame work and providing an exceptionally wide field of view for improved airmanship.

The rear mounted pusher engine with propeller and the fuel tank are also contained within the airframe offering further protection.

The joy stick mounted engine throttle control further simplifies the aircraft’s flight controls enabling additional tasks to be achieved by the pilot in flight.

Included

  • HALL AIRSPEED INDICATOR
  • 4-POINT SEATBELTS
  • 25HP VITTORAZI MOSTER INCLUDED THROTTLE FUEL SYSTEM, EXHAUST
  • 2-BLADE PROPELLER
  • PRE-FABRICATED PARTS
  • MOST TUBES ANODIZED
  • ALL AN FITTINGS, SCREWS, HARDWARE INCLUDED
  • CABLES NICO-PRESSED TO SIZE
  • GEAR WITH SHOCKS INCLUDED
  • COVERING DACRON & GLUE
  • ASSEMBLY DRAWINGS
Sours: http://www.teamupair.com/
Charlie's New Zigolo

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Mg 12 zigolo

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Zigolo MG 12 electric ultralight motorglider available from 25 to 75 HP!

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